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  1. The Moral Value of Animals.Elisa Aaltola - 2007 - The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 3:219-225.
    Altruism has often been thought to be the reason we treat animals with a certain moral respect. Animals are not moral agents who could reciprocally honour our well being, and because of this duties toward them are considered to be based on other-directed motivations. Altruism is a vague notion, and in the context of animals can be divided into at least three different alternatives. The first one equates altruism with benevolence or "kindness"; the second one argues altruism is based on (...)
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  2. The Ethics of Forgiveness: A Collection of Essays.Christel Fricke (ed.) - 2011 - Routledge.
    We are often pressed to forgive or in need of forgiveness: Wrongdoing is common. Even after a perpetrator has been taken to court and punished, forgiveness still has a role to play. How should a victim and a perpetrator relate to each other outside the courtroom, and how should others relate to them? Communicating about forgiveness is particularly urgent in cases of civil war and crimes against humanity inside a community where, if there were no forgiveness, the community would fall (...)
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  3. Love, Hate and Moral Inclusion.Anca Gheaus - 2011 - In Joseph Carlisle, James Carter & Daniel Whistler (eds.), Moral Powers, Fragile Beliefs: Essays in Moral and Religious Philosophy. Continuum International Publishing Group. pp. 29.
    Drawing upon feminist work on partiality and on the philosophy of Raimond Gaita, I argue that love for particular people can serve as a basis for including strangers in the sphere of ethically relevant individuals. While partiality for some can hinder proper treatment of others, it is also constitutive of our ability to determine the scope of morality. My line of reasoning invites the worry that hatred is as powerful in hindering moral recognition as love is in creating it. I (...)
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  4. Evil and a Worthwhile Life.Zachary J. Goldberg - 2017 - In Reflections on Ethics and Responsibility: Essays in Honor of Peter A. French. Springer. pp. 145-163.
    The concept of evil plays a central role in many of Peter French’s publications. He defines evil as “a human action that jeopardizes another person’s (or group’s) aspirations to live a worthwhile life (or lives) by the willful infliction of undeserved harm on that person(s)” (French 2011, 61, 95). Inspired by Harry Frankfurt’s work on the importance of what we care about, French argues that “the life a person leads is worthwhile if what he or she really gives a damn (...)
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  5. Contempt, Community, and the Interruption of Sense.Bryan Lueck - 2017 - Critical Horizons: A Journal of Philosophy and Social Theory:1-14.
    In the early modern period, contempt emerged as a persistent theme in moral philosophy. Most of the moral philosophers of the period shared two basic commitments in their thinking about contempt. First, they argued that we understand the value of others in the morally appropriate way when we understand them from the perspective of the morally relevant community. And second, they argued that we are naturally inclined to judge others as contemptible, and that we must therefore interrupt that natural movement (...)
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  6. Contempt and Moral Subjectivity in Kantian Ethics.Bryan Lueck - 2016 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 78 (2):305-327.
    I argue in this paper that Immanuel Kant's account of the moral wrongness of contempt in the Metaphysics of Morals provides important resources for our understanding of the nature of moral subjectivity. Although Kant typically emphasizes the subject's position as autonomous addressor of the moral law, his remarks on contempt bring into relief a dynamic relationship at the heart of practical subjectivity between the addressor and addressee positions. After tracing the development of reflection concerning the addressor and addressee positions in (...)
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  7. Real Imaginal Relationships with the Dead.Kathryn J. Norlock - forthcoming - Journal of Value Inquiry:1-16.
    Open Access: Appreciating the relationship of the living to our dead is an aspect of human life that seems to be neglected in philosophy. I argue that living individuals can have ongoing, non-imaginary, valuable relationships with deceased loved ones. This is important to establish because arguments for such relationships better generate claims in applied ethics about our conduct with respect to our dead. In the first half of the paper I advance the narrower claim that psychological literature affirmative of “imaginal (...)
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  8. Antisemitski diskurs kao jezičko-ekspresivni paternalizam.Aleksandar Prnjat - 2012 - Kultura (134):395-400.
    In this paper, I present some remarks about an example of Christian anti-Semitism. It is about well known anti-Semitic attitudes that Zoran Kindjic supports in his paper with some scholarly pretensions. I use this example to illustrate one kind of unacceptable paternalistic discourse. Namely, I argue that when it comes to basic eschatological teachings of Abrahamic religions, even the mildest form of what I have previously defined as linguistic-expressive paternalism – what could also be called conversational paternalism – cannot be (...)
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  9. O Jezičko-Ekspresivnom Paternalizmu: Replika Mihailu Markoviću.Aleksandar Prnjat - 2009 - Filozofija I Društvo 3 (20):247-250.
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  10. Crkva i paternalizam-odgovor Mihailu Markoviću.Aleksandar Prnjat - 2008 - Filozofija I Društvo 19 (2):253-256.
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  11. Moral Repair: Reconstructing Moral Relations After Wrongdoingby Margaret Urban Walker.Elizabeth V. Spelman - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (4):228-233.
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  12. Moral Repair: Reconstructing Moral Relations After Wrongdoing (Review).Elizabeth V. Spelman - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (4):pp. 228-233.
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  13. Communicating Moral Concern: An Ethics of Critical Responsiveness.Elise Springer - 2013 - MIT Press.
    Examines the social aspect of moral agency, building an account of critical engagement that focuses on the transformation of moral attention through communicative exchange, rather than on matters of judgment or on behavioral outcomes.
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  14. Value, Respect and Attachment (Book Review). [REVIEW]Julia Tanner - 2002 - Philosophical Writings (21).
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  15. Punishment Forgiveness and Reconciliation.Bill Wringe - forthcoming - Philosophia:1-26.
    It is sometimes thought that the normative justification for responding to large-scale violations of human rights via the judicial appararatus of trial and punishment is undermined by the desirability of reconciliation between conflicting parties as part of the process of conflict resolution. I take there to be philosophical, as well as practical and psychological issues involved here: on some conceptions of punishment and reconciliation, the attitudes that they involve conflict with one another on rational grounds. But I shall argue that (...)
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  16. The Moral Aspect of Nonmoral Goods and Evils.Michael J. Zimmerman - 1999 - Utilitas 11 (1):1-15.
    The idea that immoral behaviour can sometimes be admirable, and that moral behaviour can sometimes be less than admirable, has led several of its supporters to infer that moral considerations are not always overriding, contrary to what has been traditionally maintained. In this paper I shall challenge this inference. My purpose in doing so is to expose and acknowledge something that has been inadequately appreciated, namely, the moral aspect of nonmoral goods and evils. I hope thereby to show that, even (...)
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Desert
  1. Merit Pay, Utilitarianism, and Desert.Linda F. Annis - 1986 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 3 (1):33-41.
  2. Feldman's Desert-Adjusted Utilitarianism and Population Ethics.Gustaf Arrhenius - 2003 - Utilitas 15 (2):225.
    Fred Feldman has proposed a desert-adjusted version of utilitarianism,, as a plausible population axiology. Among other things, he claims that justicism avoids Derek Parfit's. This paper explains the theory and tries to straighten out some of its ambiguities. Moreover, it is shown that it is not clear whether justicism avoids the repugnant conclusion and that it is has other counter-intuitive implications. It is concluded that justicism is not convincing as a population axiology.
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  3. More on the Comparative Nature of Desert: Can a Deserved Punishment Be Unjust?Ronen Avraham & Daniel Statman - 2013 - Utilitas 25 (3):316-333.
    Adam and Eve have the same record yet receive different punishments. Adam receives the punishment that they both deserve, whereas Eve receives a more lenient punishment. In this article, we explore whether a deserved-but-unequal punishment, such as what Adam receives, can be just. We do this by explicating the conceptions of retributive justice that underlie both sides of the debate. We argue that inequality in punishment is disturbing mainly because of the disrespect it often expresses towards the offender receiving the (...)
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  4. Institutions and the Normativity of Desert.Sorin Baiasu - 2007 - Contemporary Political Theory 6 (2):175-195.
    The question of whether desert depends on institutions or institutions on desert continues to divide politicians and political theorists, particularly in disputes over the justification of the welfare state. Even though it is a significant question with direct relevance for issues of economic justice, little has been done so far to evaluate the various positions in dispute and to make explicit the concepts involved. In this paper, I first present the main senses in which the concepts of desert, dependence and (...)
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  5. Improving Our Practice of Sentencing.Brenda M. Baker - 1997 - Utilitas 9 (1):99.
    Restorative justice should have greater weight as a criterion in criminal justice sentencing practice. It permits a realistic recognition of the kinds of harm and damage caused by offences, and encourages individualized non-custodial sentencing options as ways of addressing these harms. Non-custodial sentences have proven more effective than incarceration in securing social reconciliation and preventing recidivism, and they avoid the serious social and personal costs of imprisonment. This paper argues in support of restorative justice as a guiding idea in sentencing. (...)
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  6. Revisionism and Desert.Lene Bomann-Larsen - 2010 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 4 (1):1-16.
    Revisionists claim that the retributive intuitions informing our responsibility-attributing practices are unwarranted under determinism, not only because they are false, but because if we are all victims of causal luck, it is unfair to treat one another as if we are deserving of moral and legal sanctions. One revisionist strategy recommends a deflationary concept of moral responsibility, and that we justify punishment in consequentialist rather than retributive terms. Another revisionist strategy recommends that we eliminate all concepts of guilt, blame and (...)
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  7. Serena Olsaretti , Desert and Justice , Pp. Xi + 269.Kimberley Brownlee - 2006 - Utilitas 18 (4):449.
  8. Utilitarianism and the Desert Island Problem.James Cargile - 1964 - Analysis 25 (1):23 - 24.
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  9. Consequentialism, Distribution and Desert.Erik Carlson - 1997 - Utilitas 9 (3):307.
    This paper criticizes the consequentialist theory recently put forward by Fred Feldman. I argue that this theory violates two crucial requirements. Another theory, proposed by Peter Vallentyne, is similarly flawed. Feldman's basic ideas could, however, be developed into a more plausible theory. I suggest one possible way of doing this.
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  10. Blameworthiness as Deserved Guilt.Andreas Brekke Carlsson - 2017 - Journal of Ethics 21 (1):89-115.
    It is often assumed that we are only blameworthy for that over which we have control. In recent years, however, several philosophers have argued that we can be blameworthy for occurrences that appear to be outside our control, such as attitudes, beliefs and omissions. This has prompted the question of why control should be a condition on blameworthiness. This paper aims at defending the control condition by developing a new conception of blameworthiness: To be blameworthy, I argue, is most fundamentally (...)
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  11. Against Desert as a Forward-Looking Concept.Peter Celello - 2009 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (2):144-159.
    Fred Feldman and, more recently, David Schmidtz have challenged the standard view that a person's desert is based strictly on past and present facts about him. I argue that Feldman's attempt to overturn this 'received wisdom' about desert's temporal orientation is unsuccessful, since his examples do not establish that what a person deserves now can be based on what will occur in the future. In addition, his forward-looking account introduces an unnecessary asymmetry regarding desert's temporal orientation in different contexts. Schmidtz (...)
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  12. Some Theses on Desert.Randolph Clarke - 2013 - Philosophical Explorations 16 (2):153-64.
    Consider the idea that suffering of some specific kind is deserved by those who are guilty of moral wrongdoing. Feeling guilty is a prime example. It might be said that it is noninstrumentally good that one who is guilty feel guilty (at the right time and to the right degree), or that feeling guilty (at the right time and to the right degree) is apt or fitting for one who is guilty. Each of these claims constitutes an interesting thesis about (...)
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  13. The So-Called Fertile Crescent and Desert Bay.Albert Clay - 1924 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 44:186-201.
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  14. Justice, Desert, and the Repugnant Conclusion.I. Introductory Comment - 1995 - Utilitas 7 (2).
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  15. Justice, Desert, and the Repugnant Conclusion.S. Consensus - 1995 - Utilitas 7 (2).
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  16. Badain Jaran: The Forgotten Desert.Carlos Crespo - 2013 - Scheidegger & Spiess.
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  17. There’s No Need to Rethink Desert: A Reply to Pummer.Benjamin L. Curtis - 2015 - Philosophia 43 (4):999-1010.
    Pummer : 43–77, 2014) ingeniously wraps together issues from the personal identity literature with issues from the literature on desert. However, I wish to take issue with the main conclusion that he draws, namely, that we need to rethink the following principle: Desert.: When people culpably do very wrong or bad acts, they deserve punishment in the following sense: at least other things being equal they ought to be made worse off, simply in virtue of the fact that they culpably (...)
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  18. Punishment and the Principle of Fair Play.Anthony Ellis - 1997 - Utilitas 9 (1):81.
    What I call the Just Distribution theory of punishment holds that the justification of punishment is that it rectifies the social distribution of benefits and burdens which has been upset by the offender. I argue that a recent version of this theory is no more viable than earlier versions. Like them, it fails in its avowed intention to deliver fundamental intuitions about crime and punishment. The root problem is its foundation in Hart's Principle of Fair Play, a foundation which, I (...)
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  19. Responsibility as a Condition for Desert.F. Feldman - 1996 - Mind 105 (417):165 - 168.
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  20. Desert: Reconsideration of Some Received Wisdom.Fred Feldman - 1995 - Mind 104 (413):63-77.
  21. T6. Desert: Reconsideration of Some Received Wisdom.Fred Feldman - 1995 - In Louis P. Pojman & Owen McLeod (eds.), What Do We Deserve?: A Reader on Justice and Desert. Oxford University Press. pp. 140.
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  22. Ambiguities in Feldman's Desert-Adjusted Values.I. Justice As Fit - 1995 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 55:567-85.
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  23. Utilitarianism, Hedonism, and Desert.Robert L. Frazier - 2000 - Dialogue 39 (3):626-627.
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  24. Distributive and Retributive Desert in Rawls.Jake Greenblum - 2010 - Journal of Social Philosophy 41 (2):169-184.
    In this paper I examine John Rawls’s understanding of desert. Against Samuel Scheffler, I maintain that the reasons underlying Rawls’s rejection of the traditional view of distributive desert in A Theory of Justice also commit him to rejecting the traditional view of retributive desert. Unlike Rawls’s critics, however, I view this commitment in a positive light. I also argue that Rawls’s later work commits him to rejecting retributivism as a public justification for punishment.
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  25. Two Claims About Desert.Nathan Hanna - 2013 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 94 (1):41-56.
    Many philosophers claim that it is always intrinsically good when people get what they deserve and that there is always at least some reason to give people what they deserve. I highlight problems with this view and defend an alternative. I have two aims. First, I want to expose a gap in certain desert-based justifications of punishment. Second, I want to show that those of us who have intuitions at odds with these justifications have an alternative account of desert at (...)
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  26. Moral Desert and the Self.Douglas Gordon Howie - 1998 - Dissertation, University of California, Santa Barbara
    Philosophical determinism seems to undercut any possibility of our ever deserving anything, because everything about us is caused and thus outside the range of our responsibility. We do not deserve the rewards of our successes because those successes come directly from our abilities and character. To deserve our rewards we would have to deserve our abilities and character. Since we don't deserve these things, neither do we deserve our rewards. To avoid this outcome, and preserve some sense of moral desert, (...)
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  27. Desert: Individualistic and Holistic.Thomas Hurka - 2003 - In Serena Olsaretti (ed.), Desert and Justice. Oxford University Press. pp. 45--45.
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  28. Verse: Mysterious Desert.Foster Jewell - 1966 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 47 (3):349.
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  29. Merit.Robert N. Johnson - manuscript
    A few pages into the Groundwork Kant claims that only actions from duty have moral worth.ii Even though as an aside he also says that a dutiful action from sympathy or honor, though lacking in moral worth, "deserves praise and encouragement", it is tempting not to take him very seriously. One suspects that he regards this praise as only a poor and morally insignificant cousin of the esteem reserved for actions from duty. In the end, it seems hard to avoid (...)
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  30. The Geometry of Desert.Shelly Kagan - 2012 - Oxford University Press.
    Moral desert -- Fault forfeits first -- Desert graphs -- Skylines -- Other shapes -- Placing peaks -- The ratio view -- Similar offense -- Graphing comparative desert -- Variation -- Groups -- Desert taken as a whole -- Reservations.
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  31. Comparative Desert.Shelly Kagan - 2003 - In Serena Olsaretti (ed.), Desert and Justice. Oxford University Press. pp. 93--122.
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  32. Reviving a Desert Landscape. Rao Jodha Desert Park in Jodhpur, India.Akshay Kaul - 2013 - Topos: European Landscape Magazine 82:88.
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  33. Desert Tracks Character Alone.Stephen Kershnar - 2008 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 22 (1):71-88.
    In this paper, I argue that character alone grounds desert. I begin by arguing that desert is grounded by a person’s character, action, or both. In the second section, I defend the claim that character grounds desert. My argument rests on intuitions that other things being equal, it would be intrinsically better for virtuous persons to flourish and vicious persons suffer than vice versa. In the third section, I argue that actions do not ground desert. I give three arguments in (...)
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  34. Two Faces of Desert.Matt King - 2014 - Philosophical Studies 169 (3):401-424.
    There are two broadly competing pictures of moral responsibility. On the view I favor, to be responsible for some action is to be related to it in such a way that licenses attributing certain properties to the agent, properties like blameworthiness and praiseworthiness. Responsibility is attributability. A different view understands being responsible in terms of our practices of holding each other responsible. Responsibility is accountability, which “involves a social setting in which we demand (require) certain conduct from one another and (...)
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