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  1. Forgiveness as Emotional Distancing.Santiago Amaya - forthcoming - Social Philosophy and Policy.
    In this paper, I present an account of forgiveness as a process of emotional distancing. The central claim is that, understood in these terms, forgiveness does not require a change in judgment. Rationally forgiving someone, in other words, does not require that one judges the significance of the wrongdoing differently or that one comes to the conclusion that the attitudes behind it have changed in a favorable way. The model shows in what sense forgiving is inherently social, why we should (...)
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  2. Modern Moral Conscience.Tom O’Shea - 2018 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 26 (4):582-600.
    This article challenges the individualism and neutrality of modern moral conscience. It looks to the history of the concept to excavate an older tradition that takes conscience to be social and morally responsive, while arguing that dominant contemporary justifications of conscience in terms of integrity are inadequate without reintroducing these social and moral traits. This prompts a rethinking of the nature and value of conscience: first, by demonstrating that a morally-responsive conscience is neither a contradiction in terms nor a political (...)
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  3. Empathy, Emotional Sharing and Feelings in Stein’s Early Work.Íngrid Vendrell Ferran - 2015 - Human Studies 38 (4):481-502.
    This paper is devoted to the study of the emotions in Edith Stein’s early work On the Problem of Empathy. After presenting her work embedded in the tradition of the early phenomenology of the emotions, I shall elaborate the four dimensions of the emotional experience according to this authoress, the link between emotions and values and the phenomenon of the living body. I argue that Stein’s account on empathy remains incomplete as long as we ignore the complex phenomenology of emotions (...)
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  4. Forgiveness and Identification.Geoffrey Scarre - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (4):1021-1028.
    Philosophical discussion of forgiveness has mainly focused on cases in which victims and offenders are known to each other. But it commonly happens that a victim brings an offender under a definite description but does not know to which individual this applies. I explore some of the conceptual and moral issues raised by the phenomenon of forgiveness in circumstances in which identification is incomplete, tentative or even mistaken. Among the conclusions reached are that correct and precise identification of the offending (...)
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  5. Envy to My Twin.Liz Robbins - 2006 - Feminist Studies 32 (1):84.
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  6. Exploiting the Guilt Aversion of Others: Do Agents Do It and is It Effective?Eric Cardella - 2016 - Theory and Decision 80 (4):523-560.
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  7. Book Reviews Haybron, Daniel M . The Pursuit of Unhappiness: The Elusive Psychology of Well‐Being . New York: Oxford University Press, 2008. Pp. 357. $55.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW]Anna Alexandrova - 2009 - Ethics 119 (4):773-777.
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  8. How to Insult and Compliment a Testifier.Finlay Malcolm - 2018 - Episteme 15 (1):50-64.
    Do we insult, offend or slight a speaker when we refuse her testimony? Do we compliment, commend or extol a speaker when we accept her testimony? I argue that the answer to both of these questions is “yes”, but only in some instances, since these respective insults and compliments track the reasons a hearer has for rejecting or accepting testimony. When disbelieving a speaker, a hearer may insult her because she judges the speaker to be either incompetent as a knower (...)
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  9. Affordances and the Normativity of Emotions.Rebekka Hufendiek - 2017 - Synthese 194 (11):4455-4476.
    The normativity of emotions is a widely discussed phenomenon. So far embodied accounts have not paid sufficient attention to the various aspects of the normativity of emotions. In this paper it shall be pointed out that embodied accounts are constrained in the way they can account for the normativity of emotions due to their commitments to naturalism, externalism, and anti-vehicle-internalism. One way to account for the normativity of emotions within a naturalist framework is to describe the intentional objects of emotions (...)
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  10. Telepresence and Trust: A Speech-Act Theory of Mediated Communication.Thomas Simpson - 2017 - Philosophy and Technology 30 (4):443-459.
    Trust is central to our social lives in both epistemic and practical ways. Often, it is rational only given evidence for trustworthiness, and with that evidence is made available by communication. New technologies are changing our practices of communication, enabling increasing rich and diverse ways of ‘being there’, but at a distance. This paper asks: how does telepresent communication support evidence-constrained trust? In answering it, I reply to the leading pessimists about the possibility of the digital mediation of trust, Philip (...)
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  11. There Should Not Be Shame in Sharing Responsibility: An Alternative to May’s Social Existentialist Vision.Timothy Oakberg - 2016 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 19 (3):755-772.
    Some of the greatest harms perpetrated by human beings—mass murders, for example—are directly caused by a small number of individuals, yet the full force of the transgressions would not obtain without the indirect contributions of many others. To combat such evils, Larry May argues that we ought to cultivate a sense of shared responsibility within communities. More specifically, we ought to develop a propensity to feel ashamed of ourselves when we choose to be associated with others who transgress. Grant that (...)
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  12. Elusive Objects.M. Martin - 2017 - Topoi 36 (2):247-271.
    Do we directly perceive physical objects? What is the significance of the qualification ‘directly’ here? Austin famously denied that there was a unique interpretation by which we could make sense of the traditional debate in the philosophy of perception. I look here at Thompson Clarke’s discussion of G. E. Moore and surface perception to answer Austin’s scepticism.
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  13. Group Emotions in Collective Reasoning: A Model.Claire Polo, Christian Plantin, Kristine Lund & Gerald Niccolai - 2017 - Argumentation 31 (2):301-329.
    Education and cognition research today generally recognize the tri-dimensional nature of reasoning processes as involving cognitive, social and emotional phenomena. However, there is so far no theoretical framework articulating these three dimensions from a descriptive perspective. This paper aims at presenting a first model of how group emotions work in collective reasoning, and specifies their social and cognitive functions. This model is inspired both from a multidisciplinary literature review and our extensive previous empirical work on an international corpus of videotaped (...)
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  14. The Economic Model of Forgiveness.Brandon Warmke - 2016 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 97 (4):570-589.
    It is sometimes claimed that forgiveness involves the cancellation of a moral debt. This way of speaking about forgiveness exploits an analogy between moral forgiveness and economic debt-cancellation. Call the view that moral forgiveness is like economic debt-cancellation the Economic Model of Forgiveness. In this article I articulate and motivate the model, defend it against some recent objections, and pose a new puzzle for this way of thinking about forgiveness.
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  15. The View From Here: On Affirmation, Attachment, and the Limits of Regret by R. Jay Wallace.Luke Brunning - 2014 - Analysis 74 (1):188-191.
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  16. Bakhtin, Boredom, and the ‘Democratization of Skepticism’.Michael E. Gardiner - 2017 - The European Legacy 22 (2):163-184.
    This article examines recent scholarly work on boredom by drawing on Mikhail Bakhtin’s account of modernity, irony, and mass skepticism. In The Arcades Project, Walter Benjamin noted that, beginning in the 1840s, Western societies had been gripped by an “epidemic of boredom.” He was referring to a peculiarly modern form of mass boredom, associated with the “atrophy of experience” in a mechanized and urbanized social life—a boredom Elizabeth S. Goodstein has characterized as the “democratization of skepticism.” Although Bakhtin says little (...)
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  17. Sound Trust and the Ethics of Telecare.Sander A. Voerman & Philip J. Nickel - 2017 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 42 (1):33-49.
    The adoption of web-based telecare services has raised multifarious ethical concerns, but a traditional principle-based approach provides limited insight into how these concerns might be addressed and what, if anything, makes them problematic. We take an alternative approach, diagnosing some of the main concerns as arising from a core phenomenon of shifting trust relations that come about when the physician plays a less central role in the delivery of care, and new actors and entities are introduced. Correspondingly, we propose an (...)
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  18. Dyadic Characteristics of Guanxi and Their Consequences.Jack Barbalet - 2017 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 47 (3):332-347.
    Research on guanxi is conducted principally within the disciplines of anthropology, business studies and sociology. It typically takes the form of empirical case studies, applications of extrinsic theory and literature reviews cum trend reports. The present paper, on the other hand, provides an analysis of guanxi in consideration of its elemental relations, components and properties. Discussion indicates the limitations of treatments of guanxi in terms of trust, guanxi bases, tie-strength and the conveyance of influence and information. Having established the characteristic (...)
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  19. Smith's Sympathy and Moral Sentiments. 변영진 - 2016 - Journal of Ethics 1 (111):83-107.
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  20. Experiencing the Other. How Expressivity and Value-Based Perception Provide a Non-Solipsistic Account of Empathy.Maria Chiara Bruttomesso - 2016 - Rivista Internazionale di Filosofia e Psicologia 7 (3):350-364.
    : The problem of intersubjectivity has undergone multifold discussions in the philosophical, neuroscientific and psychological fields. Currently, the predominant theories in this ongoing debate contend that simulation or explicit reasoning must ground other-understanding. Yet this contention confines the subject to solipsistic self-projection without actual communication. I will provide an analysis suggesting that the roots of the concept of “empathy” reveal not only a dualistic inner-outer distinction but also an emerging reference to the bodily dimension. I claim that, by examining the (...)
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  21. Moral Perception.Jonathan Dancy - unknown
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  22. Traversing Forgiveness.Jonathan R. Heaps - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (1):53-72.
    In the epilogue to Memory, History, Forgetting, Paul Ricoeur introduces an overlooked “vertical” axis into the problem of forgiveness. This verticality runs from the “depth” of fault to the “height” of forgiveness. For Ricoeur, forgiveness only appears an impossible “exchange” if one excludes this verticality from the question. Instead, he calls forgiveness “difficult” because it traverses from height to depth. This article argues that Ricoeur’s notion of the horizontal and the vertical in Memory, History, Forgetting is best understood as an (...)
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  23. Another Dimension to Deep Disagreements: Trust in Argumentation.L. Kloster Moira - unknown
    I will connect the literature on deep disagreements with the literature on trust to construct a two-dimensional picture of the limits of argument. Argumentation and trust are important to the functioning of society, but each sets different expectations for when arguments can and should be used to resolve disagreements. When trust is factored in, we see a more nuanced picture of which disagreements will remain too deep for objective argument. Affective and social aspects of argument are not independent of procedure (...)
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  24. The Principle of Toleration: Under What Conditions?Ruben Apressyan - 2012 - Journal of Philosophical Research 37 (Supplement):223-227.
    As a moral principle toleration is universal, but only in the sense that potentially it is addressed to every rational and moral agent. The question is whether this principle is appropriate in all situations and what are those moral agents who recognize its practical actuality for them? Toleration is not an absolute ethical principle, but one among others in the context of a particular moral system. It should be given a proper place in the hierarchy of principles. Understanding toleration as (...)
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  25. Sayre-McCord on Evaluative Facts.Richard Double - 1990 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 28 (2):165-169.
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  26. Emotional Reactions to the French Colonization in Algeria: The Normative Nature of Collective Guilt.Virginie Bonnot, Silvia Krauth-Gruber, Ewa Drozda-Senkowska & Diniz Lopes - 2016 - Social Science Information 55 (4):531-554.
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  27. Hope in Blasted Landscapes.S. Eben Kirksey, Nicholas Shapiro & Maria Brodine - 2013 - Social Science Information 52 (2):228-256.
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  28. How Much Would You Like to Pay? Trust, Reciprocity and Prosocial Motivations in El Trato.Francisco J. León, José A. Noguera & Jordi Tena-Sánchez - 2012 - Social Science Information 51 (3):389-417.
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  29. The Granting of Forgiveness in an Intergroup Context: African and Asian Social Representations.Etienne Mullet, Stéphanie Nann, Joachim Kadima Kadiangandu, Félix Neto & María da Conceição Pinto - 2010 - Social Science Information 49 (2):195-214.
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  30. The Role of Social Capital on Trust Development and Dynamics: Implications for Cooperation, Monitoring and Team Performance.Ana Cristina Costa, Katinka Bijlsma-Frankema & Bart de Jong - 2009 - Social Science Information 48 (2):199-228.
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  31. The Joint Relationships of Communication Behaviors and Task Interdependence on Trust Building and Change in Virtual Project Teams.Ramón Rico, Carlos-María Alcover, Miriam Sánchez-Manzanares & Francisco Gil - 2009 - Social Science Information 48 (2):229-255.
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  32. Trust in High-Reliability Organizations.Markus Schöbel - 2009 - Social Science Information 48 (2):315-333.
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  33. Relational Capital in Virtual Teams: The Role Played by Trust.Ana Zornoza, Virginia Orengo & Vicente Peñarroja - 2009 - Social Science Information 48 (2):257-281.
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  34. Trust and Social Capital in Teams and Organizations — Antecedents, Dynamics, Benefits and Limitations: An Introduction.Ana Cristina Costa & José M. Peiró - 2009 - Social Science Information 48 (2):131-141.
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  35. The Trust Episode in Organizations: Implications for Private and Public Social Capital.Vicente Martínez-Tur & José M. Peiró - 2009 - Social Science Information 48 (2):143-174.
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  36. Social Identity Patterns and Trust in Demographically Diverse Work Teams.Karen van der Zee, Menno Vos & Kyra Luijters - 2009 - Social Science Information 48 (2):175-198.
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  37. Emotions Are Culturally Situated.Batja Mesquita - 2007 - Social Science Information 46 (3):410-415.
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  38. Defining Emotion: A Clinical Perspective.Ian H. Gotlib - 2007 - Social Science Information 46 (3):387-391.
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  39. 2. Interpersonal Perception.Masao Ohashi - 1978 - Social Science Information 17 (4-5):632-635.
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  40. Trust but Verify: Social Capital and Moral Behavior.Eric M. Uslaner - 1999 - Social Science Information 38 (1):29-55.
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  41. Auditing Emotions: What Should We Count?Brian Parkinson - 2004 - Social Science Information 43 (4):633-645.
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  42. Declarations of Forgiveness and Remorse in European Politics.Karolina Wigura - 2017 - The European Legacy 22 (1):16-30.
    This article examines the historical background, proliferation, and later internationalization of public declarations of forgiveness and remorse, first made in Europe a few decades after the end World War II. The author suggests that these declarations should be understood as a political practice, and bases her claim on three premises: after 1945, politicians began apologizing not only for their own crimes but mainly for those perpetrated by the communities they represented; these declarations implied a tacit acceptance of responsibility of both (...)
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  43. Teresa of Avila on Theology and Shame.Megan Loumagne - 2018 - New Blackfriars 99 (1081):388-402.
    This article examines Teresa of Avila's understanding of the relationship between spiritual dryness, intellectual frustration, and shame. It argues that Teresa presents these experiences as interconnected, as well as spiritually and intellectually valuable. This aspect of Teresa's thought provides important resources for theologians in the contemporary age in its insistence on the necessarily dynamic relationship between the spiritual and the intellectual in the life of the theologian. The article concludes with an examination of shame and its impact on theological developments (...)
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  44. Traversing Forgiveness in Advance.Jonathan R. Heaps - forthcoming - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly.
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  45. Law as a Psychological Phenomenon.A. Patkin - 1936 - Australasian Journal of Psychology and Philosophy 14 (3):191-209.
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  46. An Analysis of the Components of Forgiveness.G. E. W. Scobie & E. D. Scobie - unknown
    Three studies examined the construct of forgiveness. Participants responded to 12 or 24 focus phrases in both forgiver and forgiven modes. The focus phrases were associated with seven components derived from the literature. A large percentage of participants agree with phrases in the components of relationship, new beginning, healing, and guilt release, legal and religious components tend to attract a mixed response, and condoning disagreement. Results suggest that participants have a core construct of relationship, new beginning, healing and guilt release, (...)
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  47. How We Hope: A Moral Psychology_, _written by A. Martin.Aaron D. Cobb - 2016 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 13 (6):739-742.
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  48. Emotions in Kant’s Later Moral Philosophy: Honour and the Phenomenology of Moral Value.Monika Betzler - 2008 - In Kant's Ethics of Virtue. Walter de Gruyter.
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  49. Development of Interpersonal Trust Among Children and Adolescents.Gloria Rondón, Melusina Colaço & Małgorzata Szcześniak - 2012 - Polish Psychological Bulletin 43 (1):50-58.
    Development of interpersonal trust among children and adolescents The main purpose of the present article is to introduce a topic related to the development of interpersonal trust among children and adolescents. Although this subject, since the beginnings of psychology considered as an academic discipline, has been regarded as an essential component of human functioning, there are still very few theoretical and empirical studies that approach the issue from a developmental point of view. In this paper the three-dimensional conceptualization of interpersonal (...)
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  50. Appreciating Gratitude: Is Gratitude an Amplifier of Well-Being?Eufrozyna Gruszecka - 2015 - Polish Psychological Bulletin 46 (2):186-196.
    The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between gratitude and certain components of well-being which are conducive to affirming life. Additionally, we also compared how experiencing joy impacts those components of well-being. A randomly chosen 1/3 of the participants was asked to recall an event from their past when they felt grateful. Another 1/3 was asked to recall an event from their past when they felt joy. The final 1/3 of the participants was the control group. Next, (...)
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1 — 50 / 6965