This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related

Contents
125 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 125
  1. Towards a more inclusive Enlightenment : German women on culture, education, and prejudice in the late eighteenth century.Corey W. Dyck - 2023 - In Kristin Gjesdal (ed.), The Oxford handbook of nineteenth-century women philosophers in the German tradition. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
    When attempting to capture the concept of enlightenment that underlies and motivates philosophical (and political and scientific) developments in the 18th century, historians of philosophy frequently rely upon a needlessly but intentionally exclusive account. This, namely, is the conception of enlightenment first proposed by Kant in his famous essay of 1784, which takes enlightenment to consist in the “emergence from the self-imposed state of minority” and which is only possible for a “public” to attain as a result of the public (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Wolff and the First Fifty Years of German Metaphysics.Corey W. Dyck - forthcoming - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    Table of Contents: Chapter 1: Wolff and the Refinement of the Mathematical Method / Chapter 2: Wolff’s Emendation of Ontology / Chapter 3: Soul, World, and God: Wolff’s Metaphysics / Chapter 4: Women and the Wolffian Philosophy / Chapter 5: The Abuse of Philosophy: Pietism and the Metaphysics of Freedom / Chapter 6: Reason beyond Proof: Debating the Use and Limits of the PSR / Chapter 7: The Paradoxes of Sensation/ Chapter 8: G. F. Meier on the Fate of the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  3. Mendelssohn and Kant on Human Progress: a Neo-Stoic Debate.Melissa Merritt - 2024 - In Luigi Filieri & Sophie Møller (eds.), Kant on Freedom and Nature: Essays in Honor of Paul Guyer. Routledge.
    The chapter replies to Paul Guyer’s (2020) account of the debate between Mendelssohn and Kant about whether humankind makes continual moral progress. Mendelssohn maintained that progress can only be the remit of individuals, and that humankind only “continually fluctuates within fixed limits”. Kant dubs Mendelssohn’s position “abderitism” and explicitly rejects it. But Guyer contends that Kant’s own theory of freedom commits him, malgré lui, to abderitism. Guyer’s risky interpretive position is not supported by examination of the relevant texts in their (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Moses Mendelssohn's Original Modal Proof for the Existence of God.Noam Hoffer - 2023 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 61 (2):237-256.
    Abstractabstract:In Morning Hours (1785), Moses Mendelssohn presents a proof for the existence of God from the grounding of possibility. Although Mendelssohn claims that this proof is original, it has not received much attention in the secondary literature. In this paper, I analyze this proof and present its historical context. I show that although it resembles Leibniz's proof from eternal truths and Kant's precritical possibility proof, it has unique characteristics that can be regarded as responses to deficiencies Mendelssohn identified in these (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Orgoglio ed Aufklärung_. Immanuel Kant e Friedrich Heinrich Jacobi sulla fede razionale nel contesto del _Pantheismusstreit.Federico Rossato - 2023 - Dissertation, University of Turin
    ITA: L’elaborato ha come obiettivo una ricostruzione storica del dibattito tra Immanuel Kant e Friedrich Heinrich Jacobi nel contesto del cosiddetto _Pantheismusstreit_ degli anni Ottanta del Settecento. In particolare, si andranno ad evidenziare le fonti dei due autori, i quali propongono due interpretazioni uguali e contrarie rispetto alle possibilità della fede, nonché del rapporto che questa intercorre con la ragione. Nello specifico, si andrà esponendo la posizione kantiana oltre al mito del Kant «alles Zermalmender», rimarcando le radici profonde della sua (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Kant’s Letter to Fichte, the Pure Intellect and his ‘All-Crushing’ Metaphysics: Comments on De Boer’s Kant’s Reform of Metaphysics.Brian A. Chance - 2022 - Kantian Review 27 (1):119-125.
    I raise three questions relevant to De Boer’s overall project in Kant’s Reform of Metaphysics. The first is whether Kant’s 1799 open letter to Fichte supports or threatens her contention that Kant had an abiding interest in developing a reformed metaphysics from 1781 onwards. The second is whether De Boer’s conception of the pure intellect and its place in Kant’s projected system of metaphysics captures the role of pure sensibility in the Analytic of Principles, rational physics and rational psychology. The (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Reason and Experience in Mendelssohn and Kant. [REVIEW]Ekin Erkan - 2021 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 29 (2):1-7.
    Review of Paul Guyer's Reason and Experience in Mendelssohn and Kant.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Language as a Means and an Obstacle to Freedom: The Case of Moses Mendelssohn.Avi Lifschitz - 2020 - In Quentin Skinner & van Gelderen Martin (eds.), Freedom and the Construction of Europe. Cambridge University Press.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Mendelssohn and Kant on Virtue as a Skill.Melissa McBay Merritt - 2020 - In Ellen Fridland & Carlotta Pavese (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Skill and Expertise. New York, NY: Routledge. pp. 88-99.
    The idea that virtue can be profitably conceived as a certain sort of skill has a long history. My aim is to examine a neglected episode in this history — one that focuses on the pivotal role that Moses Mendelssohn played in rehabilitating the skill model of virtue for the German rationalist tradition, and Immanuel Kant’s subsequent, yet significantly qualified, endorsement of the idea. Mendelssohn celebrates a certain automatism in the execution of skill, and takes this feature to be instrumental (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Self-Standing Beauty: Tracing Kant’s Views on Purpose-Based Beauty.Emine Hande Tuna - 2019 - Southwest Philosophy Review 35 (1):7-16.
    In his recent article, “Beauty and Utility in Kant’s Aesthetics: The Origins of Adherent Beauty,” Robert Clewis aims to offer a fresh perspective on Kant’s views on the relation between beauty and utility. While, admittedly, a fresh approach is hard to come by, given the extensive treatment of the topic, Clewis thinks that a study of its historical context and origins might give us the needed edge. The most interesting and novel aspect of Clewis’s discussion is his detailed treatment of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Rational Faith and the Pantheism Controversy: Kant's "Orientation" Essay and the Evolution of his Moral Argument.Brian Chance & Lawrence Pasternack - 2018 - In Daniel O. Dahlstrom (ed.), Kant and His German Contemporaries: Volume 2, Aesthetics, History, Politics, and Religion. Cambridge University Press.
    In this chapter we explore the importance of the Pantheism Controversy for the evolution of Kant’s so-called “Moral Argument” for the Highest Good and its postulates. After an initial discussion of the Canon of the Critique of Pure Reason, we move on to the relationship between faith and reason in the Pantheism Controversy, Kant’s response to the Controversy in his 1786 “Orientation” Essay, Thomas Wizenmann’s criticisms of that essay, and finally to the Critique of Practical Reason. We argue that while (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  12. Идолопоклонство неотделимо от человека: Мендельсон, Коген, Кассирер. Katsur - 2018 - Judaica Petropolitana 9:44-64.
    Текст Десяти заповедей Библии предписывает поклоняться только единому Богу и запрещает создавать изображения Бога и изваяния. Цель данной статьи исследовать взгляды Мендельсона, Когена и Кассирера на связь между предписанием поклоняться единому Богу и запретом идолопоклонства в иудаизме. В статье рассматривается вопрос, почему Мендельсон и Коген определяют запрет на изображение Бога как запрет, характеризующий сущность иудаизма как религии разума. Анализируя понятие знака, Мендельсон объясняет поклонение идолам как непонимание указывающей функции знака; подобное непонимание ведет к ошибочному восприятию. Коген раскрывает с помощью этого (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. The Sublime.Melissa Merritt - 2018 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    This Element considers Kant's account of the sublime in the context of his predecessors both in the Anglophone and German rationalist traditions. Since Kant says with evident endorsement that 'we call sublime that which is absolutely great' and nothing in nature can in fact be absolutely great, Kant concludes that strictly speaking what is sublime can only be the human calling to perfect our rational capacity according to the standard of virtue that is thought through the moral law. The Element (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  14. The Refutation of Mendelssohnian Idealism.de Sá Pereira Roberto Horácio - 2018 - Contemporary Studies in Kantian Philosophy Vol. Iii.
    The aim of this paper has been to present a new reconstruction of Kant’s Refutation of Idealism. I have considered several different targets of the Refutation, five of them mentioned by Kant himself. I believe that I have shown that the Refutation of Idealism is best considered only as a sound argument against Mendelssohnian subjectivist idealism, against Mendelssohnian immaterialism, and against Mendelssohnian realist idealism. First, Kant’s Refutation is a sound argument in favor of the claim that the outer things represented (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Elias Sacks, Moses Mendelssohn's Living Script: Philosophy, Practice, History, Judaism. [REVIEW]Corey W. Dyck - 2017 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2017.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Kant and His German Contemporaries : Volume 1, Logic, Mind, Epistemology, Science and Ethics.Corey Dyck & Falk Wunderlich (eds.) - 2017 - New York, NY, USA: Cambridge University Press.
    This collection of new essays, the first of its kind in English, considers the ways in which the philosophy of Immanuel Kant engages with the views of lesser-known eighteenth-century German thinkers. Each chapter casts new light on aspects of Kant's complex relationship with these figures, particularly with respect to key aspects of his logic, metaphysics, epistemology, theory of science, and ethics. The portrait of Kant that emerges is of a major thinker thoroughly engaged with his contemporaries - drawing on their (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  17. Mendelssohn, Kant, and the Mereotopology of Immortality.Jonathan Simon & Colin Marshall - 2017 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 4.
    In the first Critique, Kant claims to refute Moses Mendelssohn’s argument for the immortality of the soul. But some commentators, following Bennett (1974), have identified an apparent problem in the exchange: Mendelssohn appears to have overlooked the possibility that the “leap” between existence and non-existence might be a boundary or limit point in a continuous series, and Kant appears not to have exploited the lacuna, but to have instead offered an irrelevant criticism. Here, we argue that even if these commentators (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  18. Kant, Mendelssohn, and Immortality.Paul Guyer - 2016 - In Thomas Höwing (ed.), The Highest Good in Kant’s Philosophy. Boston: De Gruyter. pp. 157-180.
  19. Moses Mendelssohn’s Living Script: Philosophy, Practice, History, Judaism.Elias Sacks - 2016 - Bloomington, Indiana: Indiana University Press.
    Moses Mendelssohn is often described as the founder of modern Jewish thought and as a leading philosopher of the late Enlightenment. One of Mendelssohn's main concerns was how to conceive of the relationship between Judaism, philosophy, and the civic life of a modern state. Elias Sacks explores Mendelssohn's landmark account of Jewish practice--Judaism's "living script," to use his famous phrase--to present a broader reading of Mendelssohn's writings and extend inquiry into conversations about modernity and religion. By studying Mendelssohn's thought in (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  20. Freudenthal, Gideon., No Religion without Idolatry: Mendelssohn's Jewish Enlightenment. [REVIEW]Grant Kaplan - 2014 - Review of Metaphysics 68 (1):161-163.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. Moses Mendelssohn , Last Works , Ed. and Trans. by Bruce Rosenstock. Reviewed by.Colin McQuillan - 2014 - Philosophy in Review 34 (5):257-261.
  22. Oaths, Promises, and Compulsory Duties: Kant’s Response to Mendelssohn’s Jerusalem.J. Colin McQuillan - 2014 - Journal of the History of Ideas 75 (4):581-604.
    This article argues that Kant's essay on enlightenment responds to Moses Mendelssohn's defense of the freedom of conscience in Jerusalem. While Mendelssohn holds that the freedom of conscience as an inalienable right, Kant argues that the use of one's reason may be constrained by oaths. Kant calls such a constrained use of reason the private use of reason. While he also defends the unconditional freedom of the public use of reason, Kant believes that one makes oneself a part of the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  23. “ ‘Let the Law Cut through the Mountain’: Salomon Maimon, Moses Mendelssohn, and Mme. Truth”.Yitzhak Melamed - 2014 - In Lukas Muehlethaler (ed.), »Höre Die Wahrheit, Wer Sie Auch Spricht«: Stationen des Werks von Moses Maimonides Vom Islamischen Spanien Bis Ins Moderne Berlin. Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht. pp. 70-76.
    Moses Maimonides was a rare kind of radical. Being a genuine Aristotelian, he recommended following the middle path and avoiding extremism. Yet, within the sphere of Jewish philosophy and thought, he created a school of philosophical radicalism, inspiring Rabbis and thinkers to be unwilling to compromise their integrity in searching for the truth, regardless of where their arguments might lead. Both Spinoza and Salomon Maimon inherited this commitment to uncompromising philosophical inquiry. But of course, such willingness to follow a philosophical (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. Causal Powers, Hume’s Early German Critics, and Kant’s Response to Hume.Brian A. Chance - 2013 - Kant Studien 104 (2):213-236.
    Eric Watkins has argued on philosophical, textual, and historical grounds that Kant’s account of causation in the first Critique should not be read as an attempt to refute Hume’s account of causation. In this paper, I challenge the arguments for Watkins’ claim. Specifically, I argue (1) that Kant’s philosophical commitments, even on Watkins’ reading, are not obvious obstacles to refuting Hume, (2) that textual evidence from the “Disciple of Pure Reason” suggests Kant conceived of his account of causation as such (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  25. No Religion without Idolatry: Mendelssohn’s Jewish Enlightenment by Gideon Freudenthal.David Novak - 2013 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 51 (3):494-495.
    In his learned and insightful reading of the eighteenth-century German–Jewish philosopher Moses Mendelssohn, Gideon Freudenthal clearly wants to rescue him from total irrelevance. For Freudenthal claims that “Mendelssohn’s philosophy of Judaism—and of religion in general—can be defended and, in fact, still deserves contemporary interest” (12). But does Mendelssohn’s philosophy deserve the interest of philosophers who are interested in what is still significant in the present first for themselves and then for everybody else; or perhaps it deserves the interest only of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. Strauss, Leo., Leo Strauss on Moses Mendelssohn. [REVIEW]James V. Schall - 2013 - Review of Metaphysics 67 (1):190-192.
  27. Faith and Freedom: Moses Mendelssohn’s Theological-Political Thought, Michah Gottlieb, Oxford University Press, 2011. 209 pp. cl. ISBN: 978-0-19-539894. [REVIEW]Jeffrey A. Bernstein - 2012 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 6 (2):224-226.
    This article is currently available as a free download on ingentaconnect.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. Duties of Love and Self-Perfection: Moses Mendelssohn's Theory of Contract.Helge Dedek - 2012 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 32 (4):713-739.
    In his Doctrine of Right, Immanuel Kant calls Moses Mendelssohn, the towering figure of the German and the Jewish Enlightenment, a ‘Rechtsforscher’—a legal scholar. Yet not only Kant, but numerous scholars of Natural law in the 18th and 19th centuries refer to and reflect on the juridical aspects of Mendelssohn’s work, in particular his thoughts on the law of contract. In this article, I hope to shed some light on this hitherto rather unexplored facet of Mendelssohn’s oeuvre. Mendelssohn develops his (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. No Religion Without Idolatry: Mendelssohn's Jewish Enlightenment.Gideon Freudenthal - 2012 - University of Notre Dame Press.
    Moses Mendelssohn is considered the foremost representative of Jewish Enlightenment. In _No Religion without Idolatry_, Gideon Freudenthal offers a novel interpretation of Mendelssohn’s general philosophy and discusses for the first time Mendelssohn’s semiotic interpretation of idolatry in his _Jerusalem _and in his Hebrew biblical commentary. Mendelssohn emerges from this study as an original philosopher, not a shallow popularizer of rationalist metaphysics, as he is sometimes portrayed. Of special and lasting value is his semiotic theory of idolatry. From a semiotic perspective, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  30. Socrates and the Jews: Hellenism and Hebraism from Moses Mendelssohn to Sigmund Freud.Miriam Leonard - 2012 - London: University of Chicago Press.
    Illustrating how the encounter between Athens and Jerusalem became a lightning rod for intellectual concerns, this book is a sophisticated addition to the history of ideas.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  31. Socrates and the Jews: Hellenism and Hebraism From Moses Mendelssohn to Sigmund Freud.Miriam Leonard - 2012 - London: University of Chicago Press.
    "What has Athens to do with Jerusalem?” Asked by the early Christian Tertullian, the question was vigorously debated in the nineteenth century. While classics dominated the intellectual life of Europe, Christianity still prevailed and conflicts raged between the religious and the secular. Taking on the question of how the glories of the classical world could be reconciled with the Bible, _Socrates and the Jews _explains how Judaism played a vital role in defining modern philhellenism. Exploring the tension between Hebraism and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. Review of Michah Gottlieb, Faith and Freedom: Moses Mendelssohn's Theological-Political Thought (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011. [REVIEW]Yitzhak Y. Melamed - 2012 - Journal of Religion.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. Last Works.Moses Mendelssohn - 2012 - Urbana: University of Illinois Press. Edited by Bruce Rosenstock.
    Lessing's death in 1781 was a severe blow to Mendelssohn. Mendelssohn wrote his last two works to commemorate Lessing and to carry on the work to which they had dedicated much of their lives.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  34. Faith and Freedom: Moses Mendelssohn’s Theological-Political Thought.Anne Pollok - 2012 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 50 (4):618-620.
  35. Chapter 2. Refining Spinoza: Moses Mendelssohn’s Response to the Amsterdam Heretic.Daniel B. Schwartz - 2012 - In The first modern Jew: Spinoza and the history of an image. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. pp. 35-54.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. The first modern Jew: Spinoza and the history of an image.Daniel B. Schwartz - 2012 - Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.
    Pioneering biblical critic, theorist of democracy, and legendary conflater of God and nature, Jewish philosopher Baruch Spinoza (1632-1677) was excommunicated by the Sephardic Jews of Amsterdam in 1656 for his "horrible heresies" and "monstrous deeds." Yet, over the past three centuries, Spinoza's rupture with traditional Jewish beliefs and practices has elevated him to a prominent place in genealogies of Jewish modernity. The First Modern Jew provides a riveting look at how Spinoza went from being one of Judaism's most notorious outcasts (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  37. Leo Strauss on Moses Mendelssohn.Leo Strauss - 2012 - London: University of Chicago Press. Edited by Martin D. Yaffe.
    Leo Strauss's introductions to ten writings of Moses Mendelssohn -- Preliminary remark by Alexander Altmann -- Introduction to Pope a metaphysician! -- Introduction to "Epistle to Mr. Lessing in Leipzig" -- Introduction to Commentary on Moses Maimonides' "Logical terms" -- Introduction to Treatise on evidence in metaphysical sciences -- Introduction to Phädon -- Introduction to Treatise on the incorporeality of the human soul -- Introduction to "On a handwritten essay of Mr. de Luc's" -- Introduction to The soul -- Introduction (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. Leo Strauss on Moses Mendelssohn.Martin D. Yaffe (ed.) - 2012 - London: University of Chicago Press.
    Moses Mendelssohn was the leading Jewish thinker of the German Enlightenment and the founder of modern Jewish philosophy. His writings, especially his attempt during the Pantheism Controversy to defend the philosophical legacies of Spinoza and Leibniz against F. H. Jacobi’s philosophy of faith, captured the attention of a young Leo Strauss and played a critical role in the development of his thought on one of the fundamental themes of his life’s work: the conflicting demands of reason and revelation. _ Leo (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  39. Panteísmo y panenteísmo: Schelling, Schlegel y la polémica en torno al panteísmo.Ana Carrasco Conde - 2011 - Daimon: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 54:93-109.
    Desde la polémica mantenida entre Jacobi y Mendelssohn en 1785 sobre el supuesto spinozismo de Lessing, se ha considerado que sistema de razón , fatalismo y panteísmo (y con él el spinozismo como forma más perfecta) constituyen una tríada de conceptos inseparables, de ahí la afirmación clave de Schlegel en el Indierbuch : “der Pantheismus ist das System der reinen Vernunft” (KA VIII, 249; Cit. por Schelling en SW I/VII 339, n. a ; 117). De esta manera, Schelling no deja (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  40. Turning the Game against the Idealist: Mendelssohn's Refutation of Idealism and Kant's Replies.Corey W. Dyck - 2011 - In R. W. Munk (ed.), Mendelssohn's Aesthetics and Metaphysics.
    While there is good reason to think that Mendelssohn's Morgenstunden targets some of the key claims of Kant’s first Critique, this criticism has yet to be considered in the appropriate context or presented in all of its systematic detail. I show that far from being an isolated assault, Mendelssohn’s attack in the Morgenstunden is a continuation and development of his earlier criticism of Kant’s idealism as presented in the Inaugural Dissertation. I also show that Mendelssohn’s objection was more influential on (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. Diotima's Children: German Aesthetic Rationalism from Leibniz to Lessing.Kai Hammermeister - 2011 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (2):353-355.
    (2011). Diotima's Children: German Aesthetic Rationalism from Leibniz to Lessing. British Journal for the History of Philosophy: Vol. 19, No. 2, pp. 353-355.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  42. Michah Gottlieb, Faith and Freedom: Moses Mendelssohn’s Theological-Political Thought. [REVIEW]David McPherson - 2011 - Review of Metaphysics 65 (2):421-423.
  43. Morning Hours, or Lectures on God's Existence.Moses Mendelssohn, Daniel Dahlstrom & Corey W. Dyck - 2011 - Springer.
    Morning Hours is the first English translation of Morgenstunden by Moses Mendelssohn, the foremost Jewish thinker of the German Enlightenment. Published six months before Mendelssohn's death on January 4, 1786, Morning Hours is the most sustained presentation of his mature epistemological and metaphysical views, all elaborated in the service of presenting his son with proofs for the existence of God. But Morning Hours is much more than a theoretical treatise. It also plays a central role in the drama of the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. Mendelssohn's Aesthetics and Metaphysics.R. W. Munk (ed.) - 2011
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. Faith and Freedom: Moses Mendelssohn's Theological-Political Thought.Michah Gottlieb - 2010 - Oxford University Press.
    God is good : the harmony between Judaism and enlightenment philosophy -- Philosophy and law : shaping Judaism for the modern world -- Either/or : Jacobi's attack on the moderate enlightenment -- Enlightenment reoriented : Mendelssohn's pragmatic religious idealism.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  46. Philosophy and the Jewish question: Mendelssohn, Rosenzweig, and beyond.Bruce Benjamin Rosenstock - 2010 - New York: Fordham University Press.
    Performing reason: Mendelssohn on Judaism and enlightenment -- Jacobi and Mendelssohn: the tragedy of a messianic friendship -- In the year of the Lord 1800: Rosenzweig and the Spinoza quarrel -- Reinhold and Kant: the quest for a new religion of reason -- Beautiful life: Mendelssohn, Hegel, and Rosenzweig -- Mendelssohn, Rosenzweig, and political theology: beyond sovereign violence -- Beyond 1800: an immigrant Rosenzweig.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  47. Diotima's children: German aesthetic rationalism from Leibniz to Lessing.Frederick C. Beiser - 2009 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Diotima's Children is a re-examination of the rationalist tradition of aesthetics which prevailed in Germany in the late seventeenth and eighteenth century.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   32 citations  
  48. Facetten des Menschen: zur Anthropologie Moses Mendelssohns.Anne Pollok - 2009 - Hamburg: Meiner.
    Ziel dieser Studie ist es, ein umfassendes Bild des Denkens Moses Mendelssohns zu zeichnen.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  49. Enjoying the Unbeautiful: From Mendelssohn's Theory of “Mixed Sentiments” to Kant's Aesthetic Judgments of Reflection.Alexander Rueger - 2009 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 67 (2):181-189.
  50. Moses mendelssohn.Daniel Dahlstrom - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 125