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  1. George Yancy’s Density Project in White Self-Criticality Beyond Anti-Racism.Naomi Zack - 2015 - Philosophia Africana 17 (2):119-124.
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  2. Frederick Douglass: A Critical Reader by Bill E. Lawson and Frank M. Kirkland.William King - 2001 - Philosophia Africana 4 (2):99-103.
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  3. The Critical Pragmatism of Alain Locke: A Reader on Value Theory, Aesthetics, Community, Culture, Race and Education by Leonard Harris, Ed.Charles C. Verharen - 2001 - Philosophia Africana 4 (1):96-102.
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  4. One and All: Anna Julia Cooper’s Romantic Feminist Vision.Carol Wayne White - 2009 - Philosophia Africana 12 (1):83-106.
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  5. Performing Philosophical Dialogue as a Space for Dwelling Near.George Yancy - 2013 - Philosophia Africana 15 (2):99-105.
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  6. Wonderful Philosophies of Mary Seacole.Kristin Waters - 2009 - Philosophia Africana 12 (2):167-180.
  7. A Companion to African-American Philosophy.Tommy L. Lott & John P. Pittman (eds.) - 2003 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    Part I Philosophic Traditions Introduction to Part I 3 1 Philosophy and the Afro-American Experience 7 CORNEL WEST 2 African-American Existential Philosophy 33 LEWIS R. GORDON 3 African-American Philosophy: A Caribbean Perspective 48 PAGET HENRY 4 Modernisms in Black 67 FRANK M. KIRKLAND 5 The Crisis of the Black Intellectual 87 HORTENSE J. SPILLERS Part II The Moral and Political Legacy of Slavery Introduction to Part II 107 6 Kant and Knowledge of Disappearing Expression 110 RONALD A. T. JUDY 7 (...)
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  8. Prisons, Torture, Race: On Angela Y. Davis’s Abolitionism.Eduardo Mendieta - 2006 - Philosophy Today 50 (Supplement):176-181.
  9. Anna Julia Cooper, Worth, and Public Intellectuals.Carolyn M. Cusick - 2009 - Philosophia Africana 12 (1):21-40.
  10. Angela Davis.Trust No Man - 2006 - In Elizabeth Hackett & Sally Anne Haslanger (eds.), Theorizing Feminisms: A Reader. Oxford University Press.
  11. The Diminishing Soul of Black America.Earl Sheridan - 1988 - Social Theory and Practice 14 (2):131-140.
  12. Moving Beyond Us and Them? Marginality, Rhizomes, and Immanent Forgiveness.Valentine Moulard‐Leonard - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (4):828-846.
    Here, I offer a candid response to bell hooks's call for a testimony to the “movement beyond a mere ‘us and them’ discussion” that purportedly informs contemporary radical and feminist thought on difference. In alignment with a tradition that includes bell hooks, Audre Lorde, Gloria Anzaldúa, and Aurora Levins Morales, I offer a personal testimony to the ways in which I—a middle-class, French, immigrant, continental-philosophy-bred incest survivor—envision both that movement and its limits. To establish these alliances means forming necessary communities. (...)
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  13. Scholar’s Symposium: The Work of Angela Y. Davis: The Prison Contract and Surplus Punishment: On Angela Y. Davis’s Abolitionism.Eduardo Mendieta - 2007 - Human Studies 30 (4):291 - 309.
  14. African-American Perspectives and Philosophical Traditions.Vemer D. Mitchell - 1997 - Newsletter of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy 25 (78):20-22.
  15. Problems and Prospects of a History of African Philosophy.J. Obi Oguejiofor - 2003 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 77 (4):477-498.
    Although African philosophy has become a part of the world philosophic heritage that can no longer be neglected, no comprehensive history of it is available yet. This lacuna is due to the numerous problems that affect any attempt to outline such a history. Among these problems are those inherent in the historiography of philosophy in general and many others specific to African philosophy. They include the absence of scholarly unanimity over the exact nature of philosophy and, by extension, African philosophy; (...)
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  16. “Eyes in the Back of Your Head”: Moral Themes in African American Narratives of Racial Conflict.Janie Victoria Ward - 1991 - Journal of Moral Education 20 (3):267-281.
    Abstract This paper examines seven narratives of racial conflict elicited from African American adults and young people. Analysis focusses on the relational nature of the racial conflicts. Issues of power and authority inherent in the sociopolitical context in which racial knowledge develops and moral judgements regarding racial differences are determined are found to be likewise embedded in interracial interpersonal relationships. Adopting Brown & Gilligan's (1990) methodological approach to reading narratives of conflict and choice, the two moral themes of justice and (...)
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  17. Cornel West & Philosophy: The Quest for Social Justice.Clarence Sholé Johnson - 2003 - Routledge.
    Cornel West's reputation as a public and celebrity intellectual has overshadowed his important contributions to philosophy. Professor Clarence Shole Johnson provides a rectification of this situation in this benchmark, thought-provoking book. After a brief biographical sketch, Johnson leads us through a comprehensive examination of West's philosophy from his conceptions of pragmatism, existentialism, Marxism, and Prophetic Christianity to his persuasive writings on black-Jewish relations, affirmative action, and the role of black intellectuals. Special focus is given to West's writings on ethics and (...)
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  18. Thinking From the Margins, Acting at the Intersections: Anna Julia Cooper's.Vivian M. May - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (2):74-91.
    : Anna Julia Cooper's 1892 A Voice from the South is a hybrid text that speaks provocatively to contemporary feminist philosophy. Negotiating exclusionary categories of being and knowing and writing herself into intellectual traditions meant to exclude her, Cooper's narrative methods are politically tactical and epistemologically significant. Cooper inserts subjectivity into objective analysis and underscores knowledge as located and embodied. By speaking from spaces of exclusion, Cooper fully articulates the promise of intersectional approaches to liberation.
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  19. African American Christian Ethics.Samuel K. Roberts - 2001 - Pilgrim Press.
  20. What Are We Fighting For?: Sex, Race, Class, and the Future of Feminism.Joanna Russ - 1998 - St. Martin's Press.
    A study of the future of feminism calls for a return to the radical roots of feminism's direct political struggle during the 1960s and early 1970s and a move away from the de-politicized focus on women's psychology and personal relations of today.
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Black Assimiliationism
  1. Frederick Douglass's Longing for the End of Race.Ronald Sundstrom - 2005 - African Philosophy 8 (2):143-170.
    Frederick Douglass (1817–1895) argued that newly emancipated black Americans should assimilate into Anglo-American society and culture. Social assimilation would then lead to the entire physical amalgamation of the two groups, and the emergence of a new intermediate group that would be fully American. He, like those who were to follow, was driven by a vision of universal human fraternity in the light of which the varieties of human difference were incidental and far less important than the ethical, religious, and political (...)
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Black Nationalism
  1. Black Consciousness, Black Nationalism and Black Theology: Is There a Possibility for Theology of Dialogue?Kelebogile T. Resane - 2021 - HTS Theological Studies 77 (3).
  2. Black Utopia: The History of an Idea From Black Nationalism to Afrofuturism.David A. Lemke - 2020 - Utopian Studies 31 (1):216-220.
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  3. Between Race and Nation: Marcus Garvey and the Politics of Self-Determination.Desmond Jagmohan - 2020 - Political Theory 48 (3):271-302.
    This essay argues that Marcus Garvey held a constructivist theory of self-determination, one that saw nationalism and transnationalism as mutually necessary and reinforcing ideals. The argument proceeds in three steps. First it recovers Garvey’s transnationalist emphasis by looking at his intellectual debts to other diaspora struggles, namely political Zionism and Irish nationalism. Second it argues that Garvey held a constructivist view of national identity, which also grounds his argument that the black diaspora has a right to collective self-determination. Third it (...)
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  4. Conquérir la négritude : considérations inessentielles sur le genre noir.Fabien Schang - 2015 - Nouvelles Études Francophones 29:60-77.
    Quel message est apporté par le courant littéraire de la négritude, et comment procède-t-il pour le transmettre? C'est par le biais d'une écriture introspective que la diaspora noire a conquis sa dignité et dépassé le stade victimaire, par-delà le seul cadre de la communauté francophone. A travers l'histoire de la traite et de la colonisation, notre lecture procédera en trois phases: une phase locutoire, consacrée à un rappel chronologique du contexte noir dans l'Histoire; une phase illocutoire, où seront exposées les (...)
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  5. Ashes of Our Fathers: Racist Monuments and the Tribal Right.Dan Demetriou - 2020 - In Bob Fischer (ed.), Ethics, Left and Right: The Moral Issues that Divide Us. Oxford University Press.
    [Updated 2/23/21: complete chapter scan] In this chapter I sketch a rightist approach to monumentary policy in a diverse polity beleaguered by old ethnic grievances. I begin by noting the importance of tribalism, memorialization, and social trust. I then suggest a policy which 1) gradually narrows the gap between peoples in the heritage landscape, 2) conserves all but the most offensive of the least beloved racist monuments, 3) avoids recrimination (i.e., “keeps it positive”) and eschews ideological commentary in new monuments (...)
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  6. The Ethics of Racist Monuments.Dan Demetriou & Ajume Wingo - 2018 - In David Boonin (ed.), Palgrave Handbook of Philosophy and Public Policy. Palgrave.
    In this chapter we focus on the debate over publicly-maintained racist monuments as it manifests in the mid-2010s Anglosphere, primarily in the US (chiefly regarding the over 700 monuments devoted to the Confederacy), but to some degree also in Britain and Commonwealth countries, especially South Africa (chiefly regarding monuments devoted to figures and events associated with colonialism and apartheid). After pointing to some representative examples of racist monuments, we discuss ways a monument can be thought racist, and neutrally categorize removalist (...)
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  7. Two Conceptions of Black Nationalism.Tommie Shelby - 2003 - Political Theory 31 (5):664-692.
    The essay provides both an interpretation and a theoretical reconstruction of the political philosophy of Martin Delany, a mid-nineteenth-century radical abolitionist and one of the founders of the doctrine of black nationalism. It identifies two competing strands in Delany's social thought, "classical" nationalism and "pragmatic" nationalism, where each underwrites a different conception of the analytical and normative underpinnings of black political solidarity. It is argued that the pragmatic variant is the more cogent of the two and the one to which (...)
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  8. Racial Norms: A Reinterpretation of Du Bois' “The Conservation of Races”.David Miguel Gray - 2013 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 51 (4):465-487.
    I argue that standard explanations of Du Bois' theory of race inappropriately characterize his view as attempting to provide descriptive criteria for races. Such an interpretation makes it both susceptible to Appiah's circularity objection and alienates it from Du Bois' central project of solidarity—which is the central point of “Conservation.” I propose that we should understand his theory as providing a normative account of race: an attempt to characterize what some races should be in terms of what other races are. (...)
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  9. Is Transracial Adoption in the Best Interests of Ethnic Minority Children?: Questions Concerning Legal and Scientific Interpretations of a Child’s Best Interests.Shelley M. Park & Cheryl Green - 2000 - Adoption Quarterly 3 (4):5-34.
    This paper examines a variety of social scientific studies purporting to demonstrate that transracial adoption is in the best interests of children. Finding flaws in these studies and the ethical and political arguments based upon such scientific findings, we argue for adoption practices and policies that respect the racial and ethnic identities of children of color and their communities of origin.
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  10. A People's History of Philosophy: The Development and Ideological Segregation of Black Nationalism.Judith Colleen Bohr - unknown
    The primary objective of this thesis is to advocate for Black Nationalism's full inclusion in the academic field of political philosophy. By bringing the thinkers in the Black Nationalist tradition into this discourse, the field of philosophy stands to gain important insight into the prejudices and unexamined assumptions that plague academia. I will flesh out the nature of these assumptions using the works of Black Nationalists like Angela Davis, George Jackson and Joy James. This will show that reading Black Nationalists (...)
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  11. Please Don’T Make Me Touch ’Em: Towards a Critical Race Fanonianism as a Possible Justifi Cation for Violence Against Whiteness.Tommy J. Curry - 2007 - Radical Philosophy Today 2007:133-158.
    The unchanging realities of race relations in the United States, recently highlighted by the catastrophe of Hurricane Katrina, demonstrate that Black Americans are still not viewed, treated or protected as citizens in this country. The rates of poverty, disease and incarceration in Black communities have been recognized by some Critical Race Theorists as genocidal acts. Despite the appeal to the international community’s interpretation of human rights, Blacks are still the most impoverished and lethally targeted group in America. Given the “white (...)
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  12. Review Essay: An Odd Black Solidarity, Indeed: Tommie Shelby, We Who Are Dark: The Philosophical Foundations of Black Solidarity (Cambridge, Ma: Harvard University Press, 2005).Dwayne A. Tunstall - 2010 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 36 (1):111-122.
Black Separatism
  1. Race, Multiplicity, and Impure Coalitions of Resistance.Lee McBride - forthcoming - In Jacoby A. Carter and Hernando A. Estévez (ed.), Philosophizing the Americas. New York, NY, USA: Fordham University Press.
    Lucius Outlaw and Shannon Sullivan have argued for the preservation of racial distinctiveness and the necessity of racial separatism. This paper articulates and challenges this push for racial separatism and the particular conception of race evoked therein. The author points out that the multiplicity, the multiculturalism, the intersectionality within these communities of resistance is typically belittled, fragmented, or erased. Recognizing the practical use of racial coalitions to combat racism, the author articulates an alternative conception of coalitional agency, one that allows (...)
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  2. The Immersion Method II (Logic & Malcolm X).Virgil W. Brower - 2012 - Inside Higher Ed, May 3.
  3. Conquérir la négritude : considérations inessentielles sur le genre noir.Fabien Schang - 2015 - Nouvelles Études Francophones 29:60-77.
    Quel message est apporté par le courant littéraire de la négritude, et comment procède-t-il pour le transmettre? C'est par le biais d'une écriture introspective que la diaspora noire a conquis sa dignité et dépassé le stade victimaire, par-delà le seul cadre de la communauté francophone. A travers l'histoire de la traite et de la colonisation, notre lecture procédera en trois phases: une phase locutoire, consacrée à un rappel chronologique du contexte noir dans l'Histoire; une phase illocutoire, où seront exposées les (...)
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  4. Is Transracial Adoption in the Best Interests of Ethnic Minority Children?: Questions Concerning Legal and Scientific Interpretations of a Child’s Best Interests.Shelley M. Park & Cheryl Green - 2000 - Adoption Quarterly 3 (4):5-34.
    This paper examines a variety of social scientific studies purporting to demonstrate that transracial adoption is in the best interests of children. Finding flaws in these studies and the ethical and political arguments based upon such scientific findings, we argue for adoption practices and policies that respect the racial and ethnic identities of children of color and their communities of origin.
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Movements in African-American Philosophy, Misc
  1. African Philosophy in America.Leonard Harris - 2021 - In V. Y. Mudimbe & Kasereka Kavwahirehi (eds.), Encyclopedia of African Religions and Philosophy. Springer Verlag. pp. 20-21.
  2. So Goes the Nation? (Review of The Fifty Year Rebellion). [REVIEW]Michael D. Doan - 2017 - Riverwise Magazine 1 (3):30.
    The Fifty-Year Rebellion invites us to consider Detroit’s recent history as both epitomizing and shaping national trends. But it’s not the kind of invitation we’ve all grown used to...
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  3. Frederick Douglass's Longing for the End of Race.Ronald Sundstrom - 2005 - African Philosophy 8 (2):143-170.
    Frederick Douglass (1817–1895) argued that newly emancipated black Americans should assimilate into Anglo-American society and culture. Social assimilation would then lead to the entire physical amalgamation of the two groups, and the emergence of a new intermediate group that would be fully American. He, like those who were to follow, was driven by a vision of universal human fraternity in the light of which the varieties of human difference were incidental and far less important than the ethical, religious, and political (...)
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  4. Modern Order and the Promise of Anarchy: From the 'Writhing Age' of Souls to World Reconstruction.David Haekwon Kim - 2004 - The Hamline Review 28:22-71.
  5. Deconstruction, Fetishism, and the Racial Contract: On the Politics of "Faking It" in Music.Robin M. James - 2007 - CR 7 (1):45-80.
    I read Sara Kofman's work on Nietzsche, Charles Mills' _The Racial Contract_, and Kodwo Eshun's Afrofuturist musicology to argue that most condemnations of "faking it" in music rest on a racially and sexually problematic fetishization of "the real.".
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  6. The African American as African.Molefi Kete Asante - 1998 - Diogenes 46 (184):39-50.
  7. The African American Personalist Perspective on Person as Embodied in the Life and Thought of Martin Luther King Jr.Lawrence Edward Carter - 2006 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 20 (3):219-223.
  8. Existentia Africana: Understanding Africana Existential Thought.Lewis R. Gordon - 2000 - Routledge.
    The intellectual history of the last quarter of this century has been marked by the growing influence of Africana thought--an area of philosophy that focuses on issues raised by the struggle over ideas in African cultures and their hybrid forms in Europe, the Americas, and the Caribbean. Existentia Africana is an engaging and highly readable introduction to the field of Africana philosophy and will help to define this rapidly growing field. Lewis R. Gordon clearly explains Africana existential thought to a (...)
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  9. Alain Locke and Community.Leonard Harris - 1997 - The Journal of Ethics 1 (3):239-247.
    Locke consistently argues for the importance of cosmopolitan identity, i.e., cultural-citizenship. Paradoxically, he also argues for the importance of particular, local, and racial/ethnic identities. People have a natural instinct that Locke terms a consciousness of kind, to bond with persons in relatively closed communities. Communities are not natural social groups for Locke, but historical social constructions. I argue that Locke''s ethical and conceptual paradox is revolved by considering the relationship between instincts and particular social groups as asymmetrical; that groups are (...)
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