This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories

696 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 696
Material to categorize
  1. Sonic Pictures.Jason Leddington - forthcoming - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism.
    Winning essay of the American Society for Aesthetics' inaugural Peter Kivy Prize. Extends Kivy's notion of sonic picturing through engagement with recent work in philosophy of perception. Argues that sonic pictures are more widespread and more aesthetically and artistically important than even Kivy envisioned. Topics discussed include: the nature of sonic pictures; the nature of sounds; what we can (and more importantly, cannot) conclude from musical listening; sonic pictures in film; beatboxing as an art of sonic picturing; and cover songs (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Music and Multimodal Mental Imagery.Bence Nanay - forthcoming - In Music and Mental Imagery. London: Routledge.
    Mental imagery is early perceptual processing that is not triggered by corresponding sensory stimulation in the relevant sense modality. Multimodal mental imagery is early perceptual processing that is triggered by sensory stimulation in a different sense modality. For example, when early visual or tactile processing is triggered by auditory sensory stimulation, this amounts to multimodal mental imagery. Pulling together philosophy, psychology and neuroscience, I will argue in this paper that multimodal mental imagery plays a crucial role in our engagement with (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Suspending the Habit Body Through Immersive Resonance:Hesitation and Constitutive Duet in Jen Reimer and Max Stein’s Site-Specific Improvisation.Rachel Elliott - 2018 - Critical Studies in Improvisation/ Études Critiques En Improvisation 12 (2):1 - 11.
    There is increasing appreciation for the role that location plays in the experience of a musical event. This paper seeks to understand this role in terms of our habitual relationships to place, asking whether and how being musical somewhere can expand and transform our habituated comportment there, and with what consequences. This inquiry is anchored in a series of site-specific improvised performances by Jen Reimer and Max Stein, and the theory and practice of the late experimental music pioneer Pauline Oliveros. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Expectations in Music.Jenny Judge & Bence Nanay - forthcoming - In Jerrold Levinson (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Music and Philosophy. Oxford: Oxford University PRess.
    Almost every facet of the experience of musical listening—from pitch, to rhythm, to the experience of emotion—is thought to be shaped by the meeting and thwarting of expectations. But it is unclear what kind of mental states these expectations are, what their format is, and whether they are conscious or unconscious. Here, we distinguish between different modes of musical listening, arguing that expectations play different roles in each, and we point to the need for increased collaboration between music psychologists and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. A propos de la communication de la musique improvisée collective. Aspects théoriques et interculturels de la communication.Martin A. M. Gansinger - 2020 - Editions universitaires europeennes.
    La méthode musicale d'improvisation collective exprime une conception du jeu dont l'attitude de base démocratique et émancipatrice suggère des comparaisons avec le concept de la situation idéale du discours formulé par Jürgen Habermas. Cette présomption est expliquée plus en détail dans le cadre d'une approche introductive de l'improvisation collective comme processus de relation caractérisé par l'interactivité et la synchronicité. Après une discussion sur l'action d'improvisation en musique sous ses aspects théoriques, historiques et psychologiques, les différents stades de développement de l'improvisation (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Dialogic Listening: How Music May Help Us Become Better Philosophers.Pablo Muruzábal Lamberti - 2019 - Praxis y Saber 23 (10):253-272.
    This paper is about dialogic listening as a precondition for meaningful engagement in Socratic dialogues and for music. In order to arrive at a better understanding of what constitutes dialogic listening in the context of educational philosophical dialogues, I first shed light on the practice of philosophy teaching based on Nelson & Heckmann’s neo-Socratic paradigm and link this practice to Plato’s dialogues. I then argue that the activity of listening to an interlocutor during Socratic dialogues on the one hand, and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Feeling at One: Socio-Affective Distribution, Vibe, and Dance-Music Consciousness.Maria A. G. Witek - 2019 - In Ruth Herbert, Eric Clarke & David Clarke (eds.), Music and Consciousness 2: Worlds, Practices, Modalities. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 93–112.
    In this chapter, the embodied consciousness of clubbing and raving is considered through the theory of extended mind, according to which the mind is a distributed system where brain, body, and environment play equal parts. Building on the idea of music as affective atmosphere, a case is made for considering the vibe of a dance party as cognitively, socially, and affectively distributed. The chapter suggests that participating in the vibe affords primary musical consciousness—a kind of pre-reflexive state characterized by affective (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Atmosphere as a Concept for Ethnomusicology: Comparing the Gamelatron and Gamelan.Andrew McGraw - 2016 - Ethnomusicology 60 (1):125-147.
    Abstract. In this article I compare a robotic gamelan sound installation (the gamelatron) and traditional gamelan, as performed in the American gamelan subculture, in order to specify the concept of atmosphere for use within ethnomusicology. I argue that at the level of affect the gamelatron and gamelan afford similar experiences that I call “atmospheres of felt- relation.” At the level of comprehension they are registered as divergent because of their differential alignment to several discursive binaries: live/recorded, human/machine, individual/group, subject/object and (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  9. Philosophy of Music (Encyclopedia Entry).Cynthia R. Nielsen - 2013 - In Robert L. Fastiggi, Joseph W. Koterski, Trevor Lipscombe, Victor Salas & Brendan Sweetman (eds.), New Catholic Encyclopedia: Supplement 2012-2013: Ethics and Philosophy. Detroit, MI, USA: Gale. pp. 1031–1036.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Interstitial Soundings: Philosophical Reflections on Improvisation, Practice, and Self-Making.Cynthia R. Nielsen - 2015
    In Interstitial Soundings, Cynthia R. Nielsen brings music and philosophy into a fruitful and mutually illuminating dialogue. Topics discussed include the following: music's dynamic ontology, performers and improvisers as co-composers, the communal character of music, jazz as hybrid and socially constructed, the sociopolitical import of bebop, Afro-modernism and its strategic deployments, jazz and racialized practices, continuities between Michel Foucault's discussion of self-making and creating one's musical voice, Alasdair MacIntyre on practice, and how one might harmonize MacIntyre's notion of virtue development (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Research in Music Behavior.Clifford K. Madsen - 1999 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 33 (4):77.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Ethics and the Philosophy of Music Education.John W. Richmond - 1996 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 30 (3):3.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Kivy's Theory of Musical Expression.V. A. Howard - 1993 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 27 (1):10.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. The Sounds of Music: First Movement.Lawrence D. Kimmel - 1992 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 26 (3):55.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Reconciling Technical and Expressive Elements in Musical Instrument Teaching: Working with Children.Jane W. Davidson, Stephanie E. Pitts & Jorge Salgado Correia - 2001 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 35 (3):51.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Music and Empathy.Daniel Putman - 1994 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 28 (2):98.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. A Socratic Dialogue with Libby Larsen on Music, Musical Experience in American Culture, and Music Education. Strand & Larsen - 2011 - Philosophy of Music Education Review 19 (1):52.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Hans Heinrich Eggebrecht, Understanding Music: The Nature and Limits of Musical Cognition, Trans. Richard Evans.Harold Fiske - 2012 - Philosophy of Music Education Review 20 (1):87.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Music-Animated Body. Introduction.Jakub R. Matyja - 2011 - Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 2 (1).
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Democracia Liberal E Repúdio Iliberal: Roger Scruton E a Tradição Conservadora Anglo-Saxónica.João Pereira Coutinho - 2016 - Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 72 (4):1173-1190.
    Roger Scruton is one of the most relevant conservative philosophers in the British and Burkean tradition of conservatism. Our aim is to present the concept of “culture of repudiation” that is expressed in his work and to assess what are the consequences of that “culture” for Western liberal democracies. According to Scruton, the loss of a national loyalty that sustains democracy and the growing radicalization of Muslim communities in Europe are a by-product of that “culture of repudiation”.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. Percevoir L’Expression Émotionnelle Dans les Objets Inanimés : L’Exemple du Vin: Dialogue.Cain Todd - 2012 - Dialogue 51 (1):129-139.
    ABSTRACT: Amongst inanimate objects, it is generally accepted that at least some art forms, such as music and painting, are capable of being genuinely expressive of emotion, even though it is difficult to understand exactly how. In contrast, although expressive properties can be attributed to non-artworks, such as natural objects or wine, it has often been claimed that such objects cannot be genuinely expressive. Focussing on wine, I argue that once we understand properly the nature of expressiveness, if we allow (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. An Essay on Musical Expression.Charles Avison, John Jortin & Brown - 1775 - Printed for L. Davis.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  23. II—Rhythm and Stasis: A Major and Almost Entirely Neglected Philosophical Problem.Andy Hamilton - 2011 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 111 (1pt1):25-42.
    This article develops a dynamic account of rhythm as ‘order‐in‐movement’ that opposes static accounts of rhythm as abstract time, as essentially a pattern of possibly unstressed sounds and silences. This dynamic account is humanistic: it focuses on music as a humanly‐produced, sonorous phenomenon, privileging the human as opposed to the abstract, or the organic or mechanical. It defends the claim that movement is the most fundamental conceptualization of music—the basic category in terms of which it is experienced—and suggests, against Scruton, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  24. Music, Metaphor and Society: Some Thoughts on Scruton 1: Robert Grant.Robert Grant - 2012 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 71:177-207.
    Roger Scruton's 530-page blockbuster The Aesthetics of Music was published by Oxford University Press in 1997. A paperback edition followed two years later. Neither received more than a handful of notices, a few appreciative, but some grudging and some actually hostile. As its quality has come to be recognized, and as the resentments it provoked have either died down or found newer targets, the book has gradually achieved a certain canonical, even classic, status. Students of the subject now seem to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. Music and Experiencing Metaphorically-As: Further Delineation: Articles.Christopher Peacocke - 2010 - British Journal of Aesthetics 50 (2):189-191.
    (No abstract is available for this citation).
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  26. Music and Philosophy in the Advent of Christianity.Kyla MacDonald - 2012 - Lumen Veritatis 5 (20):47-64.
  27. What Do We Hear When We Hear Music?: A Radical Phenomenology of Music.Ruud Welten - 2009 - Studia Phaenomenologica 9:269-286.
    In this contribution I want to sketch a phenomenology of music, expounding and expanding the philosophy of Michel Henry. In the work of Henry, several approaches to a phenomenology of music are made. The central question of the contribution is: “What do we hear when we hear music?” It is argued that there is an unbridgeable divide between the intentional sphere of the world and its sounds and what in Henry’s philosophy is understood as Life. Music is the language of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  28. Musical Twofoldness.Bence Nanay - 2012 - The Monist 95 (4):606-623.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. Constraints on Manipulations of Emotions by Music: A Critique of Tom Cochrane’s Assumptions.Vladimir J. Konečni - 2012 - Philosophy Today 56 (3):327-332.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Bodies That Sing Mutilation, Morality, and Music: In the Case of Farinelli.Geraldine Finn - 1999 - International Studies in Philosophy 31 (1):47-60.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. “Play It Yourself”: Swedish Music in Movement.Johan Fornäs - 1993 - Social Science Information 32 (1):39-65.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. Social Support as a Mediator for Musical Achievement.Roman Ossowski & Anna Antonina Nogaj - 2015 - Polish Psychological Bulletin 46 (2):300-308.
    This article focuses on the issue of social support received by students of music schools in the context of their musical achievements. The theoretical part of this article contains the characteristics of factors related to the musical achievements of students; the support they receive from their environment is essential for their success in the process of musical education and their subsequent artistic career, in addition to their musical abilities and traits of personality. The research part is devoted to detailed analysis (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. Music-Specific Emotion: An Elusive Quarry.Jerrold Levinson - 2016 - Estetika 53 (2):115-131.
    Expressive music, almost everyone agrees, evokes an emotional response of some kind in receptive listeners, at least some of the time, in at least some conditions of listening. But is such an emotional response distinctive of or unique to the music that evokes it? In other words, is there such a thing as music-specific emotion? This essay is devoted to an exploration of that question and others related to it. In the main part of the essay a sixpart component model (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. Natural Sounds and Musical Sounds: A Dual Distinction.John Dyck - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (3):291-302.
    In this article I consider the relationship between natural sounds and music. I evaluate two prominent accounts of this relationship. These accounts satisfy an important condition, the difference condition: musical sounds are different from natural sounds. However, they fail to meet an equally important condition, the interaction condition: musical sounds and natural sounds can interact in aesthetically important ways to create unified aesthetic objects. I then propose an alternative account of the relationship between natural sounds and music that meets both (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  35. Performing, Creating, and Listening to Nature Through Music: The Art of Self-Integration. Matsunobu - 2013 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 47 (4):64.
    One of the prime characteristics of the increasingly technological and interconnected world is the disappearance of analogue experience in all aspects of life. Due to technological invention, we are exposed to a variety of news and information, checking emails in private and business accounts for a significant amount of time each day. Our information-driven minds are constantly occupied by the desire to seek out more information. The ways we engage in music also have changed. We now download mp3 files and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. Is Music an Art?Peter Kivy - 1991 - Journal of Philosophy 88 (10):544-554.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. Seeing Music Performance: Visual Influences on Perception and Experience.William Forde Thompson, Phil Graham & Frank A. Russo - 2005 - Semiotica 2005 (156):203-227.
    Drawing from ethnographic, empirical, and historical / cultural perspectives, we examine the extent to which visual aspects of music contribute to the communication that takes place between performers and their listeners. First, we introduce a framework for understanding how media and genres shape aural and visual experiences of music. Second, we present case studies of two performances, and describe the relation between visual and aural aspects of performance. Third, we report empirical evidence that visual aspects of performance reliably influence perceptions (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  38. The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians. Stanley Sadie.Joseph Dyer - 1983 - Speculum 58 (2):528-535.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. Theatricality, Public Space, and Music in Rousseau.Tracy B. Strong - 1996 - Substance 25 (2):110.
  40. Music and Consciousness: A Continuing Project.D. Clarke & E. Clarke - 2014 - Arts and Humanities in Higher Education 13 (1-2):77-87.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. An Interactive Learning-Aid System for Analytical Comprehension of Music by Highlighting Orchestral Score in Colors.Masaki Matsubara, Masaki Suwa & Hiroaki Saito - 2012 - Transactions of the Japanese Society for Artificial Intelligence 27 (5):281-295.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. Content-Based Music Search and Recommendation System.Kazuki Takegawa, Yoshinori Hijikata & Shogo Nishida - 2008 - Transactions of the Japanese Society for Artificial Intelligence 23:330-343.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. A Response to Estelle R. Jorgensen, "Four Philosophical Models of the Relationship Between Theory and Practice".Randall Everett Allsup - 2005 - Philosophy of Music Education Review 13 (1):104-108.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  44. Response to Estelle R. Jorgensen, "Four Philosophical Models of the Relationship Between Theory and Practice".W. Ann Stokes - 2005 - Philosophy of Music Education Review 13 (1):102-104.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. Four Philosophical Models of the Relation Between Theory and Practice.Estelle R. Jorgensen - 2005 - Philosophy of Music Education Review 13 (1):21-36.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. Learning Music: Embodied Experience in the Life-World.Eva Alerby & Cecilia Ferm - 2005 - Philosophy of Music Education Review 13 (2):177-185.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  47. Effects of Infant Carrying Practices on Rhythm in Music.Barbara Ayres - 1973 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 1 (4):387-404.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  48. How to Expand Musical Formalism. Smith - 2015 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 49 (2):20-38.
    Word usage and behavior show that most people think of music as a distinct category of valuable experience, yet music lovers are known to have widely different ideas of what music offers. Some love its power to express or arouse emotions; some love the immediate sensuous-kinetic pleasure of tone and beat; some find a compelling sense of individual or communal identity in it; some are caught by the puzzle-solving interest of its compositional designs. Most will agree, nonetheless, that music is (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. Philosophers on Music: Experience, Meaning, and Work.Kathleen Stock (ed.) - 2007 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Philosophers on Music: Experience, Meaning, and Work presents significant new contributions to central issues in the philosophy of music, written by leading philosophers working in the analytic tradition. The issues tackled include: the question of what sort of thing a work of music is; the nature of the relation between a musical work and versions of it; the nature of musical expression and its contribution to musical experience; the relation of music to metaphor; the nature of musical irony; the musical (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  50. Expression and Truth: On the Music of Knowledge.Lawrence Kramer - 2012 - University of California Press.
    Expression and truth are traditional opposites in Western thought: expression supposedly refers to states of mind, truth to states of affairs. _Expression and Truth_ rejects this opposition and proposes fluid new models of expression, truth, and knowledge with broad application to the humanities. These models derive from five theses that connect expression to description, cognition, the presence and absence of speech, and the conjunction of address and reply. The theses are linked by a concentration on musical expression, regarded as the (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 696