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  1. Susanne Langer on Music and Time.Eran Guter & Inbal Guter - 2021 - Estetika 58 (1):35-56.
    Susanne Langer’s idea of the primary apparition of music involves a dichotomy between two kinds of temporality: ‘felt time’ and ‘clock time’. For Langer, musical time is exclusively felt time, and in this sense, music is ‘time made audible’. However, Langer also postulates a ‘strong suspension thesis’: the swallowing up of clock time in the illusion of felt time. In this essay, we take issue with the ‘strong suspension thesis’, its philosophic foundation and its implications. We argue that this thesis (...)
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  2. A Philosophical Account of Listening Musically.Paskalina Bourbon - 2020 - Contemporary Aesthetics 18.
    What is the distinctive character of musical experiences? An answer: musical experience is distinctive because it is of music. I argue, however, that the difference between musical and nonmusical experience cannot be explained with an ontological account of music per se. Instead, we have musical experiences of sounds whenever we listen and attend to sounds in a particular kind of way. I call this special kind of attention “musical listening.” One can explain why musical experiences are distinctive by explaining what (...)
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  3. The Philosophical Significance of Wittgenstein’s Experiments on Rhythm, Cambridge 1912–13.Eran Guter - 2020 - Estetika 57 (1):28-43.
    Wittgenstein’s experiments on rhythm, conducted in Charles Myers’s laboratory in Cambridge during the years 1912–13, are his earliest recorded engagement in thinking about music, not just appreciating it, and philosophizing by means of musical thinking. In this essay, I set these experiments within their appropriate intellectual, scientific, and philosophical context in order to show that, its minor scientific importance notwithstanding, this onetime excursion into empirical research provided an early onset for Wittgenstein’s career-long exploration of the philosophically pervasive implications of aspects. (...)
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  4. Shared Musical Experiences.Brandon Polite - 2019 - British Journal of Aesthetics 59 (4):429-447.
    In ‘Listening to Music Together’, Nick Zangwill offers three arguments which aim to establish that listening to music can never be a joint activity. If any of these arguments were sound, then our experiences of music, qua object of aesthetic attention, would be essentially private. In this paper, I argue that Zangwill’s arguments are unsound and I develop an account of shared musical experience that defends three main conclusions. First, joint listening is not merely possible but a common feature of (...)
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  5. Beyond Musical Metaphysics: A Philosophical Account of Listening to Music.Paskalina Bourbon - 2018 - Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 74 (4):1377-1398.
    Music’s original philosophical problem is ontological: what is it? In this paper, I argue that music has a better philosophical beginning; philosophical accounts of music should begin as philosophical accounts of listening to music. What distinguishes listening to music from hearing sound? My aim is to give a philosophical account of music by means of a description of a particular kind of interactive relationship we sometimes have to sound. Music, I shall argue, is not distinguished from sound because it has (...)
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  6. On the Divide: Analytic and Continental Philosophy of Music.Tiger Roholt - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 75 (1):49-58.
    On offer here is a tradition-neutral way of understanding the distinction between analytic and continental philosophy of music. The distinction is drawn in terms of methodology, rather than content, by identifying contrasting methodological tendencies of each tradition—initial maneuvers that frame an investigation, which are related to one another insofar as they involve, or do not involve, two kinds of methodological detachment. These maneuvers are extracted through a consideration of contrasting pairs of examples. The pairs consist of an analytic and a (...)
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  7. Movement in Music. An Enactive Account of the Dynamic Qualities of Music.Francesca Forlè - 2016 - Humana Mente (16):169-185.
    In this paper I shall attempt to give an enactive account of the dynamic qualities of music. Starting from Krueger’s account of musical experience, I will highlight how music’s qualities of movement are constituted in the horizon of an embodied consciousness – that is, an embodied subject who can virtually or actually bodily entrain with music and then follow the musical profile. I will argue that the common rythmòs-structure of both music and movement makes such an enactive constitution possible. In (...)
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  8. Wittgenstein Reimagines Musical Depth.Eran Guter - 2016 - In Stefan Majetschak Anja Weiberg (ed.), Aesthetics Today: Contemporary Approaches to the Aesthetics of Nature and of Art, Contributions to the 39th International Wittgenstein Symposium (Kirchberg am Wechsel: ALWS, 2016). pp. 87-89.
    I explore and outline Wittgenstein's original response to the Romantic discourse concerning musical depth, from his middle-period on. Schopenhauer and Spengler served as immediate sources for Wittgenstein's reliance on Romantic metaphors of depth concerning music. The onset for his philosophic intervention in the discourse was his critique of Schenker's view of music and his general shift toward the 'anthropological view', which occurred at the same time. In his post-PI period Wittgenstein was able to reimagine musical depth in terms of vertically (...)
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  9. Aesthetic Negativity and Aisthetic Traits.Jonathan Owen Clark - 2015 - Critical Horizons 16 (1):52-69.
    This article concerns the notion of aesthetic negativity, and related ideas regarding the autonomy of art. After giving some initial definitions and a brief historical sketch of these concepts, we will examine the definition proposed by arguably the greatest thinker of aesthetic negativity, Theodor Adorno, and its recent semiotic reconstruction in the work of Christoph Menke. This reconstruction configures aesthetic negativity and autonomy jointly as the capacity of artworks, and the experiences that they occasion; to processurally negate ‘‘automatic’’ modes of (...)
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  10. The Music Between Us: Is Music a Universal Language? By Kathleen Marie Higgins. [REVIEW]Tom Cochrane - 2015 - Mind 124 (496):1288-1292.
  11. Impurely Musical Make-Believe.Eran Guter & Inbal Guter - 2015 - In Alexander Bareis & Lene Nordrum (eds.), How to Make-Believe: The Fictional Truths of the Representational Arts. De Gruyter. pp. 283-306.
    In this study we offer a new way of applying Kendall Walton’s theory of make-believe to musical experiences in terms of psychologically inhibited games of make-believe, which Walton attributes chiefly to ornamental representations. Reading Walton’s theory somewhat against the grain, and supplementing our discussion with a set of instructive examples, we argue that there is clear theoretical gain in explaining certain important aspects of composition and performance in terms of psychologically inhibited games of make-believe consisting of two interlaced game-worlds. Such (...)
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  12. An Imaginative Theory of Musical Space and Movement.Andrew Kania - 2015 - British Journal of Aesthetics 55 (2):157-172.
    The experience of notes as higher or lower than one another, and of movement within passages of music, underpins many other musical experiences. Several theories of such an experience have been defended, claiming that concepts of space and movement variously play some sort of metaphorical role in our experience, can be eliminated from musical discourse, or apply literally to the music. I argue that all such theories should be rejected in favour of the view that our experience of musical space (...)
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  13. Empathy Beyond the Head: Comment on "Music, Empathy, and Cultural Understanding".Joel Krueger - 2015 - Physics of Life Reviews 15:92-93.
  14. Musicing, Materiality, and the Emotional Niche.Joel Krueger - 2015 - Action, Criticism, and Theory for Music Education 14 (3):43-62.
    Building on Elliot and SilvermanÕs (2015) embodied and enactive approach to musicing, I argue for an extended approach: namely, the idea that music can function as an environmental scaffolding supporting the development of various experiences and embodied practices that would otherwise remain inaccessible. I focus especially on the materiality of music. I argue that one of the central ways we use music, as a material resource, is to manipulate social spaceÑand in so doing, manipulate our emotions. Acts of musicing, thought (...)
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  15. Music as Atmosphere. Lines of Becoming in Congregational Worship.Friedlind Riedel - 2015 - Lebenswelt. Aesthetics and Philosophy of Experience 6:80-111.
    In this paper I offer critical attention to the notion of atmosphere in relation to music. By exploring the concept through the case study of the Closed Brethren worship services, I argue that atmosphere may provide analytical tools to explore the ineffable in ecclesial practices. Music, just as atmosphere, commonly occupies a realm of ineffability and undermines notions such as inside and outside, subject and object. For this reason I present music as a means of knowing the atmosphere. The first (...)
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  16. Music Feels Like Moods Feel.Kris Goffin - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5:327.
    While it is widely accepted that music evokes moods, there is disagreement over whether music-induced moods are relevant to the aesthetic appreciation of music as such. The arguments against the aesthetic relevance of music-induced moods are: moods cannot be intentionally directed at the music and music-induced moods are highly subjective experiences and are therefore a kind of mind-wandering. This paper presents a novel account of musical moods that avoids these objections. It is correct to say that a listener’s entire mood (...)
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  17. The Varieties of Musical Experience.Brandon Polite - 2014 - Pragmatism Today 5 (2):93-100.
    Many philosophers of music, especially within the analytic tradition, are essentialists with respect to musical experience. That is, they view their goal as that of isolating the essential set of features constitutive of the experience of music, qua music. Toward this end, they eliminate every element that would appear to be unnecessary for one to experience music as such. In doing so, they limit their analysis to the experience of a silent, motionless individual who listens with rapt attention to the (...)
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  18. To Think or Not To Think: The Apparent Paradox of Expert Skill in Music Performance.Andrew Geeves, Doris J. F. McIlwain, John Sutton & Wayne Christensen - 2013 - Educational Philosophy and Theory (6):1-18.
    Expert skill in music performance involves an apparent paradox. On stage, expert musicians are required accurately to retrieve information that has been encoded over hours of practice. Yet they must also remain open to the demands of the ever-changing situational contingencies with which they are faced during performance. To further explore this apparent paradox and the way in which it is negotiated by expert musicians, this article profiles theories presented by Roger Chaffin, Hubert Dreyfus and Tony and Helga Noice. For (...)
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  19. In Praise of Ambiguity: Musical Subtlety and Merleau-Ponty.Tiger C. Roholt - 2013 - Contemporary Aesthetics 11.
    When a jazz, rock, or hip-hop drummer strikes certain notes in each measure slightly late, instead of hearing the degree to which those notes are late, we typically hear the effects of those variations; namely, a groove, the "feel" of a rhythm. Slight variations of pitch function similarly. In this essay, I argue that certain analytic theorists go astray due to their preoccupation with the variations themselves. By invoking Maurice Merleau- Ponty's insights into subtle visual perceptions, and his notion of (...)
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  20. From Formalism to Experience: A Jamesian Perspective on Music, Computing, and Consciousness.Meurig Beynon - 2011 - In David Clarke & Eric F. Clarke (eds.), Music and Consciousness: Philosophical, Psychological, and Cultural Perspectives. Oxford University Press.
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  21. The Routledge Companion to Philosophy and Music.Theodore Gracyk & Andrew Kania (eds.) - 2011 - Routledge.
    _The Routledge Companion to Philosophy and Music_ is an outstanding guide and reference source to the key topics, subjects, thinkers and debates in philosophy and music. Over fifty entries by an international team of contributors are organised into six clear sections: general issues emotion history figures kinds of music music, philosophy and related disciplines _The Routledge Companion to Philosophy and Music_ is essential reading for anyone interested in philosophy, music and musicology.
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  22. Enacting Musical Content.Joel Krueger - 2011 - In Riccardo Manzotti (ed.), Situated Aesthetics: Art Beyond the Skin. Imprint Academic. pp. 63-85.
    This chapter offers the beginning of an enactive account of auditory experience—particularly the experience of listening sensitively to music. It investigates how sensorimotor regularities grant perceptual access to music qua music. Two specific claims are defended: (1) music manifests experientially as having complex spatial content; (2) sensorimotor regularities constrain this content. Musical content is thus brought to phenomenal presence by bodily exploring structural features of music. We enact musical content.
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  23. Doing Things with Music.Joel W. Krueger - 2011 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 10 (1):1-22.
    This paper is an exploration of how we do things with music—that is, the way that we use music as an esthetic technology to enact micro-practices of emotion regulation, communicative expression, identity construction, and interpersonal coordination that drive core aspects of our emotional and social existence. The main thesis is: from birth, music is directly perceived as an affordance-laden structure. Music, I argue, affords a sonic world, an exploratory space or nested acoustic environment that further affords possibilities for, among other (...)
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  24. The Music Instinct: How Music Works and Why We Can't Do Without It.Philip Ball - 2010 - Oxford University Press.
    Now in The Music Instinct , award-winning writer Philip Ball provides the first comprehensive, accessible survey of what is known--and still unknown--about how ...
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  25. Why Music Moves Us - Jeanette Bicknell. [REVIEW]Christopher Bartel - 2010 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (3):317-319.
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  26. Confessions of an Unrepentant Timbral Sonicist.Julian Dodd - 2010 - British Journal of Aesthetics 50 (1):33-52.
    Simplifying somewhat, sonicists believe that works of music are individuated purely in terms of how they sound. For them, exact sound-alikes are identical. Stephen Davies, in his ‘Musical Works and Orchestral Colour’ ( BJA 48 (2008), pp. 363–375) took me to task for defending a version of sonicism. In this paper I seek to explain why Davies's objections miss their mark. In the course of the discussion, I make some methodological remarks about the ontology of music.
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  27. Sonic Art and the Nature of Sonic Events.David Roden - 2010 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 1 (1):141-156.
    Musicians and theorists such as the radiophonic pioneer Pierre Schaeffer, view the products of new audio technologies as devices whereby the experience of sound can be displaced from its causal origins and achieve new musical or poetic resonances. Accordingly, the listening experience associated with sonic art within this perspective is ‘acousmatic’; the process of sound generation playing no role in the description or understanding of the experience as such. In this paper I shall articulate and defend a position according to (...)
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  28. Musical Musical Nuance.Tiger C. Roholt - 2010 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (1):1-10.
  29. Scruton's Musical Experiences.Nick Zangwill - 2010 - Philosophy 85 (1):91-104.
    Roger Scruton’s account of the nature of music and our experience of it foregrounds the imagination. It is a particularly interesting and promising ‘non-realist’ view in the aesthetics of music, in the sense that it does not postulate aesthetic properties of music that we represent in musical experience. In this paper I critically examine both Scruton’s view and his main argument for it.
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  30. Musical Recordings.Andrew Kania - 2009 - Philosophy Compass 4 (1):22-38.
    In this article, I first consider the metaphysics of musical recordings: their variety, repeatability, and transparency. I then turn to evaluative or aesthetic issues, such as the relative virtues of recordings and live performances, in light of the metaphysical discussion.
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  31. Enacting Musical Experience.Joel Krueger - 2009 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 16 (2-3):98-123.
    I argue for an enactive account of musical experience — that is, the experience of listening ‘deeply’(i.e., sensitively and understandingly) to a piece of music. The guiding question is: what do we do when we listen ‘deeply’to music? I argue that these music listening episodes are, in fact, doings. They are instances of active perceiving, robust sensorimotor engagements with and manipulations of sonic structures within musical pieces. Music is thus experiential art, and in Nietzsche’s words, ‘we listen to music with (...)
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  32. Experience and Consciousness: Enhancing the Notion of Musical Understanding.Adriana Renero - 2009 - Critica 41 (121):23-46.
    Disagreeing with Jerrold Levinson's claim that being conscious of broad-span musical form is not essential to understanding music, I will argue that our awareness of musical architecture is significant to achieve comprehension. I will show that the experiential model is not incompatible with the analytic model. My main goal is to show that these two models can be reconciled through the identification of a broader notion of understanding. After accomplishing this reconciliation by means of my new conception, I will close (...)
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  33. Musical Experience, Philosophical Perspectives.Tiger C. Roholt - 2009 - In Tim Bayne, Axel Cleeremans & Patrick Wilken (eds.), Oxford Companion to Consciousness. Oxford University Press.
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  34. Radiohead and Some Questions About Music.Edward Slowik - 2009 - In George Reisch & B. W. Forbes (eds.), Radiohead and Philosophy. Chicago, IL: Open Court: pp. 41-52.
    This essay examines the music of Radiohead as a means of introducing various elementary concepts and theories in the philosophy of music.
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  35. Music, Mind, and Morality: Arousing the Body Politic.Philip Alperson & Noël Carroll - 2008 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 42 (1):1-15.
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  36. Critical Review of 'Practicing Perfection: Memory & Piano Performance'.Wayne Christensen, Doris McIlwain, John Sutton & Andrew Geeves - 2008 - Empirical Musicology Review 3 (3).
    How do concert pianists commit to memory the structure of a piece of music like Bach’s Italian Concerto, learning it well enough to remember it in the highly charged setting of a crowded performance venue, yet remaining open to the freshness of expression of the moment? Playing to this audience, in this state, now, requires openness to specificity, to interpretation, a working dynamicism that mere rote learning will not provide. Chaffin, Imreh and Crawford’s innovative and detailed research suggests that the (...)
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  37. Musik und Schmerz.Andreas Dorschel - 2008 - Musiktheorie 23 (3):257-263.
    Ancient mythology related music to pain in a twofold way. Pain is the punishment inflicted for producing inferior music: the fate of Marsyas; music is sublimation of pain: the achievement of Orpheus and of Philomela. Both aspects have played defining roles in Western musical culture. Pain’s natural expression is the scream. To be present in music at all, pain needs to be transformed. So even where music expresses pain, at the same time it appeases that very pain. Unlike the scream, (...)
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  38. The Philosophy of Music.Andrew Kania - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    This is an overview of analytic philosophy of music. It is in five sections, as follows: 1. What Is Music? 2. Musical Ontology 3. Music and the Emotions 4. Understanding Music 5. Music and Value.
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  39. The Sounding of the World: Aesthetic Reflections on Traditional Gong Music of Vietnam.Philip Alperson, B. E. N. Chí & To Ngoc Thanh - 2007 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 65 (1):11–20.
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  40. Explaining Musical Experience.Paul Boghossian - 2007 - In Kathleen Stock (ed.), Philosophers on Music: Experience, Meaning, and Work. Oxford University Press.
    I start with the observation that we often respond to a musical performance with emotion -- even if it is just the performance of a piece of absolute music, unaccompanied by text, title or programme. We can be exhilarated after a Rossini overture brought off with subtlety and panache; somber and melancholy after Furtlanger’s performance of the slow movement of the Eroica. And so forth. These emotions feel like the real thing to me – or anyway very close to the (...)
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  41. Resonanzen. Vom Erinnern in der Musik.Andreas Dorschel (ed.) - 2007 - Universal Edition.
    In "Resonanzen", scholars and artists explore aspects of memory and recollection in music. Composers Georg Friedrich Haas and Isabel Mundry set out how their art involves memory (as well as oblivion). Music historians Laurenz Lütteken, Nicole Schwindt and Klaus Aringer scrutinize the role of memory in early modern music; Anselm Gerhardt, Peter Franklin, László Vikárius and Harald Haslmayr follow up the theme for compositional practice of the 19th and 20th centuries. Aaron Williamon adds a psychological perspective on memory in musical (...)
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  42. Epistemisk og epimonisk sansning.Carl Erik Kühl - 2007 - Filosofiske Studier 1:1-30.
    ”Hvad er musik?” lyder et gammelt og godt spørgsmål, og svaret udformes i reglen som en redegørelse for, hvordan musik lyder. Med modernismen (Ligeti, Stockhausen, etc.). har vi imidlertid gjort den erfaring, at musikken kan forblive musik, selv når den er uden melodi, uden metrisk puls etc. Men hvis der ingen grænser er for, hvordan musik- ken kan lyde, kan vi heller ikke afgrænse – definere – musikken ved at henvise til, hvordan den lyder. Vi må, mener jeg, snarere tage (...)
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  43. Learning Music: Embodied Experience in the Life-World.Eva Alerby & Cecilia Ferm - 2005 - Philosophy of Music Education Review 13 (2):177-185.
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  44. Response to Eva Alerby and Cecilia Ferm, "Learning Music: Embodied Experience in the Life-World&Quot.Christine Brown - 2005 - Philosophy of Music Education Review 13 (2):208-210.
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  45. What Do We Understand In Musical Experience?Guy Dammann - 2005 - Postgraduate Journal of Aesthetics 2 (2):70-75.
    Of the many difficult questions that populate the rather treacherous terrain of the philosophy of music, the one that perplexes and interests me the most often crops up in various guises in the myriad books of‘ Quotations for music lovers’ and such like. The following version may be said to capture its fundamental idea. Given that music doesn’t seem in any obvious sense to be about anything precisely, why do we seem to think that it conveys so much so strongly?
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  46. Dem Ohr voraus. Erwartung und Vorurteil in der Musik.Andreas Dorschel (ed.) - 2004 - Universal Edition.
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  47. Wittgenstein on Musical Experience and Knowledge.Eran Guter - 2004 - In J. C. Marek & E. M. Reicher (eds.), Experience and Analysis: Papers of the 27th International Wittgenstein Symposium. Austrian Ludwig Wittgenstein Society.
    Wittgenstein’s thinking on music is intimately linked to core issues in his work on the philosophy of psychology. I argue that inasmuch musical experience exemplifies the kind of grammatical complexity that is indigenous to aspect perception and, in general, to concepts that are based on physiognomy, it is rendered by Wittgenstein as a form of knowledge, namely, knowledge of mankind.
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  48. Music and the Ineffable.Vladimir Jankelevich & Vladimir Jankelevitch (eds.) - 2003 - Princeton University Press.
    Vladimir Jankélévitch left behind a remarkable œuvre steeped as much in philosophy as in music. His writings on moral quandaries reflect a lifelong devotion to music and performance, and, as a counterpoint, he wrote on music aesthetics and on modernist composers such as Fauré, Debussy, and Ravel. Music and the Ineffable brings together these two threads, the philosophical and the musical, as an extraordinary quintessence of his thought. Jankélévitch deals with classical issues in the philosophy of music, including metaphysics and (...)
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  49. Review of Naomi Cumming, "The Sonic Self: Musical Subjectivity and Signification". [REVIEW]Catherine Legg - 2002 - Recherches Semiotiques / Semiotic Inquiry 22 (1-2-3):315-327.
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  50. The Moving Mirrors of Music.A. E. Denham - 1999 - Music & Letters 80:411-432.
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