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1 — 50 / 66
  1. added 2020-06-16
    The Moving Mirrors of Music.A. E. Denham - 1999 - Music & Letters 80:411-432.
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  2. added 2020-04-15
    The Philosophical Significance of Wittgenstein’s Experiments on Rhythm, Cambridge 1912–13.Eran Guter - 2020 - Estetika 57 (1):28-43.
    Wittgenstein’s experiments on rhythm, conducted in Charles Myers’s laboratory in Cambridge during the years 1912–13, are his earliest recorded engagement in thinking about music, not just appreciating it, and philosophizing by means of musical thinking. In this essay, I set these experiments within their appropriate intellectual, scientific, and philosophical context in order to show that, its minor scientific importance notwithstanding, this onetime excursion into empirical research provided an early onset for Wittgenstein’s career-long exploration of the philosophically pervasive implications of aspects. (...)
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  3. added 2020-02-11
    New Essays on Musical Understanding.A. Hamilton - 2005 - Mind 114 (453):169-173.
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  4. added 2019-10-20
    On the Resistance of the Instrument.Tom Cochrane - 2013 - In Tom Cochrane, Klaus Scherer & Bernardino Fantini (eds.), The Emotional Power of Music: Multidisciplinary perspectives on musical arousal, expression, and social control. Oxford: pp. 75-83.
    I examine the role that the musical instrument plays in shaping a performer's expressive activity and emotional state. I argue that the historical development of the musical instrument has fluctuated between two key values: that of sharing with other musicians, and that of creatively exploring new possibilities. I introduce 'the mood organ'- a sensor-based computer instrument that automatically turns signals of the wearer's emotional state into expressive music.
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  5. added 2019-06-24
    Musical Feelings And Atonal Music.Elina Packalén - 2005 - Postgraduate Journal of Aesthetics 2 (2):97-104.
    Several recent studies in many different fields have focused on the question of how music can be expressive of such emotions that only sentient beings can feel. In philosophy of music the adherents of cognitivist theories of expressivity (e.g. Davies 2003, Kivy 2002) try to solve this problem by explaining that we hear music as expressive of emotions, because we hear the events and contours of music as resembling the typical ways in which human beings express their emotions in behaviour (...)
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  6. added 2019-06-24
    What Do We Understand In Musical Experience?Guy Dammann - 2005 - Postgraduate Journal of Aesthetics 2 (2):70-75.
    Of the many difficult questions that populate the rather treacherous terrain of the philosophy of music, the one that perplexes and interests me the most often crops up in various guises in the myriad books of‘ Quotations for music lovers’ and such like. The following version may be said to capture its fundamental idea. Given that music doesn’t seem in any obvious sense to be about anything precisely, why do we seem to think that it conveys so much so strongly?
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  7. added 2018-08-18
    Muzička Ekspresivnost.Sanja Sreckovic - 2015 - Theoria: Beograd 58 (3):19-39.
    The paper deals with the relationship between the art of music and human emotions, in particular, with the feature of musical works designated in aesthetic literature as „expressiveness“. After a short presentation of several main attempts at explaining the expressiveness of music in analytical aesthetics, the author offers a clarification of the conceptual confusion within presented theories, and points out their main difficulties and deficiencies.
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  8. added 2018-04-22
    Music and the Ineffable.Carolyn Abbate (ed.) - 2003
    Vladimir Jankélévitch left behind a remarkable œuvre steeped as much in philosophy as in music. His writings on moral quandaries reflect a lifelong devotion to music and performance, and, as a counterpoint, he wrote on music aesthetics and on modernist composers such as Fauré, Debussy, and Ravel. Music and the Ineffable brings together these two threads, the philosophical and the musical, as an extraordinary quintessence of his thought. Jankélévitch deals with classical issues in the philosophy of music, including metaphysics and (...)
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  9. added 2018-02-17
    Experience and Consciousness: Enhancing the Notion of Musical Understanding.Adriana Renero - 2009 - Critica 41 (121):23-46.
    Disagreeing with Jerrold Levinson's claim that being conscious of broad-span musical form is not essential to understanding music, I will argue that our awareness of musical architecture is significant to achieve comprehension. I will show that the experiential model is not incompatible with the analytic model. My main goal is to show that these two models can be reconciled through the identification of a broader notion of understanding. After accomplishing this reconciliation by means of my new conception, I will close (...)
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  10. added 2017-09-11
    Groove: A Phenomenology of Rhythmic Nuance by Tiger C. Roholt.Andrew Kania - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 51 (1):115-119.
    Musicians of all sorts talk of getting “into a groove,” whether using those words or others; musical listeners also talk about the groove of a passage of music, a performance, or a recording. In his four-chapter essay, Groove, Tiger Roholt offers answers to questions that seem obvious candidates for philosophical inquiry yet that few philosophers have even touched on: what is a groove, exactly, and what is it to perceive or understand—to get— a groove? His answers are intriguing, not just (...)
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  11. added 2017-01-04
    Movement in Music. An Enactive Account of the Dynamic Qualities of Music.Francesca Forlè - 2016 - Humana Mente (16):169-185.
    In this paper I shall attempt to give an enactive account of the dynamic qualities of music. Starting from Krueger’s account of musical experience, I will highlight how music’s qualities of movement are constituted in the horizon of an embodied consciousness – that is, an embodied subject who can virtually or actually bodily entrain with music and then follow the musical profile. I will argue that the common rythmòs-structure of both music and movement makes such an enactive constitution possible. In (...)
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  12. added 2016-12-30
    Music.Kania Andrew - 2013 - In Berys Gaut & Dominic McIver Lopes (eds.), Routledge Companion to Aesthetics. New York, USA: Routledge. pp. 639-648.
    An overview of analytic philosophy of music.
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  13. added 2016-10-18
    Music: Drastic or Gnostic?Carolyn Abbate - 2004 - Critical Inquiry 30 (3):505-536.
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  14. added 2016-09-21
    Music and Cognitive Extension.Luke Kersten - 2014 - Empirical Musicology Review 9 (3-4):193-202.
    Extended cognition holds that cognitive processes sometimes leak into the world (Dawson, 2013). A recent trend among proponents of extended cognition has been to put pressure on phenomena thought to be safe havens for internalists (Sneddon, 2011; Wilson, 2010; Wilson & Lenart, 2014). This paper attempts to continue this trend by arguing that music perception is an extended phenomenon. It is claimed that because music perception involves the detection of musical invariants within an “acoustic array”, the interaction between the auditory (...)
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  15. added 2016-09-17
    Wittgenstein on Musical Depth and Our Knowledge of Humankind.Eran Guter - 2017 - In Garry L. Hagberg (ed.), Wittgenstein on Aesthetic Understanding. Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 217-247.
    Wittgenstein’s later remarks on music, those written after his return to Cambridge in 1929 in increasing intensity, frequency, and elaboration, occupy a unique place in the annals of the philosophy of music, which is rarely acknowledged or discussed in the scholarly literature. These remarks reflect and emulate the spirit and subject matter of Romantic thinking about music, but also respond to it critically, while at the same time they interweave into Wittgenstein’s forward thinking about the philosophic entanglements of language and (...)
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  16. added 2016-08-14
    Wittgenstein Reimagines Musical Depth.Eran Guter - 2016 - In Stefan Majetschak Anja Weiberg (ed.), Aesthetics Today: Contemporary Approaches to the Aesthetics of Nature and of Art, Contributions to the 39th International Wittgenstein Symposium (Kirchberg am Wechsel: ALWS, 2016). pp. 87-89.
    I explore and outline Wittgenstein's original response to the Romantic discourse concerning musical depth, from his middle-period on. Schopenhauer and Spengler served as immediate sources for Wittgenstein's reliance on Romantic metaphors of depth concerning music. The onset for his philosophic intervention in the discourse was his critique of Schenker's view of music and his general shift toward the 'anthropological view', which occurred at the same time. In his post-PI period Wittgenstein was able to reimagine musical depth in terms of vertically (...)
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  17. added 2016-03-04
    The Music Between Us: Is Music a Universal Language? By Kathleen Marie Higgins. [REVIEW]Tom Cochrane - 2015 - Mind 124 (496):1288-1292.
  18. added 2016-02-28
    Empathy, Enaction, and Shared Musical Experience.Joel Krueger - 2013 - In Tom Cochrane, Bernardino Fantini & Klaus Scherer (eds.), The Emotional Power of Music: Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Musical Expression, Arousal and Social Control. Oxford University Press. pp. 177-196.
  19. added 2016-02-28
    Doing Things with Music.Joel W. Krueger - 2011 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 10 (1):1-22.
    This paper is an exploration of how we do things with music—that is, the way that we use music as an esthetic technology to enact micro-practices of emotion regulation, communicative expression, identity construction, and interpersonal coordination that drive core aspects of our emotional and social existence. The main thesis is: from birth, music is directly perceived as an affordance-laden structure. Music, I argue, affords a sonic world, an exploratory space or nested acoustic environment that further affords possibilities for, among other (...)
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  20. added 2016-02-19
    "Where Nature Will Speak to Them in Sacred Sounds" : Music and Transcendence in E.T.A. Hoffmann.Thomas J. Mulherin - 2015 - In Férdia Stone-Davis (ed.), Music and Transcendence. Ashgate. pp. 159-176.
  21. added 2015-12-10
    Style and the Processes of Art.Kendall Walton - 1979/2008 - In Wa & Kendall tpm (eds.), The Concept of Style. Oxford University Press. pp. 220--248.
  22. added 2015-08-29
    A Correspondence Theory of Musical Representation.Brandon E. Polite - 2010 - Dissertation, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
    This dissertation defends the place of representation in music. Music’s status as a representational art has been hotly debated since the War of the Romantics, which pitted the Weimar progressives (Liszt, Wagner, &co.) against the Leipzig conservatives (the Schumanns, Brahms, &co.) in an intellectual struggle for what each side took to be the very future of music as an art. I side with the progressives, and argue that music can be and often is a representational medium. Correspondence (or resemblance) theories (...)
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  23. added 2015-08-26
    The Metaphysics of Mash‐Ups.Christopher Bartel - 2015 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 73 (3):297-308.
    Accounts of the ontology of musical works seek to uncover what metaphysically speaking a musical work is and how we should identify instances of musical works. In this article, I examine the curious case of the mash-up and seek to address two questions: are mash-ups musical works in their own right and what is the relationship between the mash-up and its source materials? As mash-ups are part of the broader tradition of rock, I situate this discussion within an ontology of (...)
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  24. added 2015-06-28
    Impurely Musical Make-Believe.Eran Guter & Inbal Guter - 2015 - In Alexander Bareis & Lene Nordrum (eds.), How to Make-Believe: The Fictional Truths of the Representational Arts. De Gruyter. pp. 283-306.
    In this study we offer a new way of applying Kendall Walton’s theory of make-believe to musical experiences in terms of psychologically inhibited games of make-believe, which Walton attributes chiefly to ornamental representations. Reading Walton’s theory somewhat against the grain, and supplementing our discussion with a set of instructive examples, we argue that there is clear theoretical gain in explaining certain important aspects of composition and performance in terms of psychologically inhibited games of make-believe consisting of two interlaced game-worlds. Such (...)
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  25. added 2015-05-07
    Historical Formalism in Music: Toward a Philosophical Theory of Musical Form.Andrea Baldini - 2014 - Contemporary Aesthetics 12:N/A.
    In this paper I begin to fashion a theory of musical form that I call historical formalism. Historical formalism posits that our perception of the formal properties of a musical work is informed by considerations not only of artistic categories but also of the historical, sociopolitical, and cultural circumstances within which that work was composed.
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  26. added 2014-12-17
    Dem Ohr voraus. Erwartung und Vorurteil in der Musik.Andreas Dorschel (ed.) - 2004 - Universal Edition.
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  27. added 2014-04-02
    Wittgenstein and the Limits of Musical Grammar.H. Appelqvist - 2013 - British Journal of Aesthetics 53 (3):299-319.
    This paper offers a Kantian reading of Wittgenstein’s later conception of rules. Building on the continuity of Wittgenstein’s comparison between a sentence and a musical theme, the paper argues that central elements of the Kantianism one may find in Wittgenstein’s early philosophy carry over to his mature conception of grammar. Moreover, this Kantian reading offers a novel perspective on the puzzle about the normativity of Wittgenstein’s later notion of rules. It is argued that the normativity of an aesthetic judgement, understood (...)
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  28. added 2014-04-02
    Resemblance, Convention, and Musical Expressiveness.James O. Young - 2012 - The Monist 95 (4):587-605.
    Peter Kivy and Stephen Davies developed an influential and convincing account of what features of music cause listeners to hear it as expressive of emotion. Their view (the resemblance theory) holds that music is expressive of some emotion when it resembles human expressive behaviour. Some features of music, they believe, are expressive of emotion because of conventional associations. In recent years, Kivy has rejected the resemblance theory without adopting an alternative. This essay argues that Kivy has been unwise to abandon (...)
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  29. added 2014-04-01
    Against Musical Ontology.Aaron Ridley - 2003 - Journal of Philosophy 100 (4):203 - 220.
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  30. added 2014-03-31
    Wittgenstein's Musical Understanding.Sarah E. Worth - 1997 - British Journal of Aesthetics 37 (2):158-167.
  31. added 2014-03-30
    Stance: Ideas About Emotion, Style, and Meaning for the Study of Expressive Culture.Harris M. Berger - 2009 - Wesleyan University Press.
    Locating stance -- Structures of stance in lived experience -- Stance and others, stance and lives -- The social life of stance and the politics of expressive culture.
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  32. added 2014-03-28
    From Formalism to Experience: A Jamesian Perspective on Music, Computing, and Consciousness.Meurig Beynon - 2011 - In David Clarke & Eric F. Clarke (eds.), Music and Consciousness: Philosophical, Psychological, and Cultural Perspectives. Oxford University Press.
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  33. added 2014-03-24
    The Role of Meaning in Music.Eddy M. Zemach - 2002 - British Journal of Aesthetics 42 (2):169-178.
    It has been persuasively argued that music refers. For example, a passage that resembles the demeanour of people under the sway of emotion E is seen as itself being E and, thus, as referring to E. Yet what is the purpose of such reference? Serious music, I say, works as a proof. A passage that refers to E is cast as a well-formed formula in a calculus. That formula is then creatively developed in accordance with the rules of that calculus (...)
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  34. added 2014-03-24
    New Essays on Musical Understanding.Constantijn Koopman - 2002 - British Journal of Aesthetics 42 (4):428-430.
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  35. added 2014-03-20
    Musical Understanding, Musical Works, and Emotional Expression: Implications for Education.David J. Elliott - 2005 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 37 (1):93–103.
    What do musicians, critics, and listeners mean when they use emotion‐words to describe a piece of instrumental music? How can ‘pure’ musical sounds ‘express’ emotions such as joyfulness, sadness, anguish, optimism, and anger? Sounds are not living organisms; sounds cannot feel emotions. Yet many people around the world believe they hear emotions in sounds and/or feel the emotions expressed by musical patterns. Is there a reasonable explanation for this dilemma? These issues gain additional importance when we ask them in the (...)
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  36. added 2014-03-18
    Evaluation, Standards, Normalization: Historico-Philosophical Formations and the Conditions of Possibility for Checklist Thought.Bernadette Baker - 2002 - Philosophy of Music Education Review 10 (2):92-101.
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  37. added 2014-03-17
    Musikalischer Sinn: Beiträge Zu Einer Philosophie der Musik.Alexander Becker & Matthias Vogel (eds.) - 2007 - Suhrkamp.
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  38. added 2014-03-17
    Music and the Aesthetics of Modernity: Essays.Karol Berger, Anthony Newcomb & Reinhold Brinkmann (eds.) - 2005 - Harvard University Press.
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  39. added 2014-03-14
    Melody and Metaphorical Movement.Rafael De Clercq - 2007 - British Journal of Aesthetics 47 (2):156-168.
    In recent issues of this journal, Roger Scruton and Malcolm Budd have debated the question whether hearing a melody in a sequence of sounds necessarily involves an ‘unasserted thought’ about spatial movement. According to Scruton, the answer is ‘yes’; according to Budd, the answer is ‘no’. The conclusion of this paper is that, while Budd may have underestimated the viability of Scruton's thesis in one of its possible interpretations, there is no good reason to assume that the thesis is true. (...)
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  40. added 2014-03-14
    Competition, Knowledge, and the Loss of Educational Vision.Michael W. Apple - 2003 - Philosophy of Music Education Review 11 (1):3-22.
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  41. added 2014-03-12
    Levels and Kinds of Listeners' Musical Understanding.Erkki Huovinen - 2008 - British Journal of Aesthetics 48 (3):315-337.
    This article examines an account of the listener's musical understanding put forward by Stephen Davies. I begin by discussing Davies's "expressibility requirement", according to which a musical listener should be able to express his understanding in sentences that are truth-apt. This is followed by a reconstruction of Davies's argument for the idea that high levels of musical understanding can be attained without possessing music-theoretical concepts. Such a conclusion is seen to follow from his belief that although musical understandings may be (...)
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  42. added 2014-03-09
    The Future of Tonality.A. E. Denham - 2009 - British Journal of Aesthetics 49 (4):427-450.
    Is the tonal ordering of music, and the order of European triadic tonality in particular, the developed manifestation of an essential musical structure—a structure naturally suited to our human capacity to organize sounds musically? Historically and geographically, triadic tonality is a highly local phenomenon, limited to music beginning in the mid-seventeenth century and, until the nineteenth century, almost wholly confined to the Western European musical tradition. Some theorists accordingly regard tonality as a dispensable aesthetic convention—and one which, moreover, has had (...)
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  43. added 2014-03-09
    Hard Times: Philosophy and the Fundamentalist Imagination.Randall Everett Allsup - 2005 - Philosophy of Music Education Review 13 (2):139-142.
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  44. added 2014-03-09
    A Response to Estelle R. Jorgensen, "Four Philosophical Models of the Relationship Between Theory and Practice&Quot.Randall Everett Allsup - 2005 - Philosophy of Music Education Review 13 (1):104-108.
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  45. added 2014-03-09
    Response to Eva Alerby and Cecilia Ferm, "Learning Music: Embodied Experience in the Life-World&Quot.Christine Brown - 2005 - Philosophy of Music Education Review 13 (2):208-210.
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  46. added 2014-03-07
    The Musical Representation: Meaning, Ontology, and Emotion, by Charles O. Nussbaum.M. de Bellis - 2010 - Mind 119 (473):225-228.
    (No abstract is available for this citation).
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  47. added 2014-03-06
    Rethinking Variations of Musical Meaningfulness.Anneli Arho - 2006 - Philosophy of Music Education Review 14 (1):55-64.
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  48. added 2014-02-10
    The Representational Content of Musical Experience.Mark DeBellis - 1991 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 51 (June):303-24.
  49. added 2013-09-16
    The Musical Image: A Theory of Content.Laurence D. Berman - 1993 - Greenwood Press.
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  50. added 2013-06-03
    Dirección Coral y Técnica Vocal, ¿Un diálogo posible? Reflexiones metodológicas para un trabajo vocal eficiente.Nicolás Alessandroni & Esteban Etcheverry - 2011 - European Review of Artistic Studies 3 (2):1-11.
    Hace 60 años el funcionamiento de la voz en tanto instrumento regido por las leyes acústicas e inscripto en el cuerpo humano, y por lo tanto, gobernado por los mecanismos fisiológicos, era un misterio. Hoy en día, gracias a los avances de la ciencia, es posible (y resulta inevitable) presentar la voz desde una perspectiva sólidamente fundamentada. La práctica coral es práctica vocal, y por lo tanto, para el director coral resulta fundamental estar familiarizado con los nuevos conocimientos disponibles en (...)
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