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  1. added 2018-11-18
    Why Can’T I Change Bruckner’s Eighth Symphony?David Friedell - forthcoming - Philosophical Studies:1-20.
    Musical works change. Bruckner revised his Eighth Symphony. Ella Fitzgerald and many other artists have made it acceptable to sing the jazz standard “All the Things You Are” without its original verse. If we accept that musical works genuinely change in these ways, a puzzle arises: why can’t I change Bruckner’s Eighth Symphony? More generally, why are some individuals in a privileged position when it comes to changing musical works and other artifacts, such as novels, films, and games? I give (...)
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  2. added 2018-10-22
    Music and Vague Existence.David Friedell - 2017 - Res Philosophica 94 (4):437-449.
    I explain a tension between musical creationism and the view that there is no vague existence. I then suggest ways to reconcile these views. My central conclusion is that, although some versions of musical creationism imply vague existence, others do not. I discuss versions of musical creationism held by Jerrold Levinson, Simon Evnine, and Kit Fine. I also present two new versions. I close by considering whether the tension is merely an instance of a general problem raised by artifacts, both (...)
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  3. added 2018-09-06
    Rock as a Three-Value Tradition.Christopher Bartel - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 75 (2):143-154.
    Gracyk, Kania, and Davies all agree that the rock tradition is distinctive for the central place that it gives to the appreciation of recorded tracks. But we should not be led by those arguments to conclude that the central position of the recorded track makes such appreciation the exclusive interest in rock. I argue that both songwriting and live performance are also central to the rock tradition by showing that the practice of recording tracks admits of a diversity of goals (...)
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  4. added 2018-06-22
    Hearing and Seeing Musical Expression.Vincent Bergeron & Dominic Mciver Lopes - 2009 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 78 (1):1-16.
    Everybody assumes (1) that musical performances are sonic events and (2) that their expressive properties are sonic properties. This paper discusses recent findings in the psychology of music perception that show that visual information combines with auditory information in the perception of musical expression. The findings show at the very least that arguments are needed for (1) and (2). If music expresses what we think it does, then its expressive properties may be visual as well as sonic; and if its (...)
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  5. added 2018-05-23
    Fictionalism About Musical Works.Anton Killin - 2018 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 48 (2):266-291.
    The debate concerning the ontological status of musical works is perhaps the most animated debate in contemporary analytic philosophy of music. In my view, progress requires a piecemeal approach. So in this article I hone in on one particular musical work concept – that of the classical Western art musical work; that is, the work concept that regulates classical art-musical practice. I defend a fictionalist analysis – a strategy recently suggested by Andrew Kania as potentially fruitful – and I develop (...)
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  6. added 2018-02-17
    Are There No Things That Are Scientific Theories?S. French & P. Vickers - 2011 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 62 (4):771-804.
    The ontological status of theories themselves has recently re-emerged as a live topic in the philosophy of science. We consider whether a recent approach within the philosophy of art can shed some light on this issue. For many years philosophers of aesthetics have debated a paradox in the (meta)ontology of musical works (e.g. Levinson [1980]). Taken individually, there are good reasons to accept each of the following three propositions: (i) musical works are created; (ii) musical works are abstract objects; (iii) (...)
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  7. added 2017-09-11
    Piece for the End of Time: In Defence of Musical Ontology: Articles.Andrew Kania - 2008 - British Journal of Aesthetics 48 (1):65-79.
    Aaron Ridley has recently attacked the study of musical ontology—an apparently fertile area in the philosophy of music. I argue here that Ridley's arguments are unsound. There are genuinely puzzling ontological questions about music, many of which are closely related to questions of musical value. While it is true that musical ontology must be descriptive of pre-existing musical practices and that some debates, such as that over the creatability of musical works, have little consequence for questions of musical value, none (...)
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  8. added 2017-05-09
    The Aesthetics of Electronic Dance Music, Part II: Dancers, DJs, Ontology and Aesthetics.Nick Wiltsher - 2016 - Philosophy Compass 11 (8):426-436.
    What's aesthetically interesting or significant about electronic dance music? The first answer I consider here is that dancing is significant. Using literature on groove, dance and expression, I sketch an account of club dancing as expressive activity. I next consider the aesthetic achievements of DJs, introducing two conceptions of what they do. These thoughts lead to discussions of dance music's ontology. I suggest that the fundamental work of dance music is the mix and that mixes require their own ontology, distinct (...)
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  9. added 2017-04-26
    The Ontology of Musical Works and the Role of Intuitions: An Experimental Study.Christopher Bartel - 2018 - European Journal of Philosophy 26 (1):348-367.
    Philosophers of music often appeal to intuition to defend ontological theories of musical works. This practice is worrisome as it is rather unclear just how widely shared are the intuitions that philosophers appeal to. In this paper, I will first offer a brief overview of the debate over the ontology of musical works. I will argue that this debate is driven by a conflict between two seemingly plausible intuitions—the repeatability intuition and the creatability intuition—both of which may be defended on (...)
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  10. added 2017-02-15
    Components of Musical Savant Skill.L. Miller - 1989 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 27 (6):514-514.
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  11. added 2017-02-09
    Works of Art and Other Cultural Objects.Andrew Harrison - 1967 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 68:105 - 128.
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  12. added 2017-01-26
    1 The Musical, the Magical, and the Mathematical Soul1.Rae Langton - 2000 - In Tim Crane & Sarah Patterson (eds.), History of the Mind-Body Problem. New York: Routledge. pp. 13.
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  13. added 2017-01-25
    PF Strawson and Stephen Davies on the Ontology of Art.Anders Pettersson - 2009 - Organon F: Medzinárodný Časopis Pre Analytickú Filozofiu 16 (4):615-631.
    P.F. Strawson’s Individuals contains a condensed version of an ontology of art. According to this ontology, musical and literary compositions are similar to types. They are abstract entities, instantiated in the performances of the piece of music or the copies of the literary work. Musical and literary compositions are “well-entrenched”, Strawson says – we cannot eliminate these abstractions, or perhaps we have no need to do so. Strawson’s ontology of art forms an integral part of what he calls his “descriptive (...)
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  14. added 2017-01-24
    The Process and Content of Musical Identity Formation.Ion Olteţeanu - 2012 - Analysis and Metaphysics 11:168-173.
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  15. added 2017-01-24
    Constituting the Musical Object: A Neurophenomenological Perspective on Musical Research.Andrea Schiavio - 2012 - Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy 31 (3):63-80.
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  16. added 2017-01-22
    Musical Platonism in Elizabethan Renaissance.I. Chrissochoidis - unknown
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  17. added 2017-01-19
    Against Musical Platonism.Stefano Predelli - 1995 - British Journal of Aesthetics 35 (4):338-350.
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  18. added 2017-01-18
    Types, Tokens and the Identity of the Musical Work.Nigel Harrison - 1975 - British Journal of Aesthetics 15 (4):336-346.
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  19. added 2017-01-16
    History of the Ontology of Art.Paisley Nathan Livingston - unknown
    Questions central to the ontology of art include the following: what sort of things are works of art? Do all works of art belong to any one basic ontological category? Do all or only some works have multiple instances? Do works have parts or constituents, and if so, what is their relation to the work as a whole? How are particular works of art individuated? Are they created or discovered? Can they be destroyed? Explicit and extensive treatments of these topics (...)
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  20. added 2017-01-16
    Extant Medieval Musical Instruments: A Provisional Catalogue by Types. Frederick Crane.Edmund A. Bowles - 1974 - Speculum 49 (2):324-326.
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  21. added 2017-01-14
    Computer-Generated Music, Authorship, and Work Identity.Maria Elisabeth Reicher - 2015 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 91 (1):107-130.
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  22. added 2016-12-31
    Platonism Vs. Nominalism in Contemporary Musical Ontology.Andrew Kania - 2013 - In Christy Mag Uidhir (ed.), Art and Abstract Objects. Oxford University Press. pp. 197.
    In this essay I first outline contemporary Platonism about musical works – the theory that musical works are abstract objects. I then consider reasons to be suspicious of such a view, motivating a consideration of nominalist theories of musical works. I argue for two conclusions: first, that there are no compelling reasons to be a nominalist about musical works in particular, i.e. that nominalism about musical works rests on arguments for thoroughgoing nominalism, and, second, that if Platonism fails, fictionalism about (...)
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  23. added 2016-12-31
    Review: Musical Works and Performances: A Philosophical Exploration. [REVIEW]Andrew Kania - 2003 - Mind 112 (447):513-518.
    A review of Stephen Davies's book, Musical Works and Performances.
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  24. added 2016-12-30
    Performances and Recordings.Andrew Kania & Theodore Gracyk - 2011 - In Theodore Gracyk & Andrew Kania (eds.), Routledge Companion to Philosophy and Music. New York, USA: Routledge. pp. 80-90.
    An overview of philosophical issues raised by musical performances and recordings.
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  25. added 2016-12-30
    New Waves in Musical Ontology.Andrew Kania - 2008 - In Kathleen Stock & Katherine Thomson-Jones (eds.), New Waves in Aesthetics. Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 20--40.
    An overview of current issues in musical ontology, including debates about "fundamental" vs. "higher-order" musical ontology and skepticism about both kinds.
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  26. added 2016-12-21
    Modality, Individuation, and the Ontology of Art.Carl Matheson & Ben Caplan - 2008 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 38 (4):491-517.
    In 1988, Michael Nyman composed the score for Peter Greenaway’s film Drowning by Numbers (or did something that we would ordinarily think of as composing that score). We can think of Nyman’s compositional activity as a “generative performance” and of the sound structure that Nyman indicated (or of some other abstract object that is appropriately related to that sound structure) as the product generated by that performance (ix).1 According to one view, Nyman’s score for Drowning by the Numbers—the musical work—is (...)
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  27. added 2016-12-08
    Paganini Does Not Repeat. Musical Improvisation and the Type/Token Ontology.Alessandro Bertinetto - 2012 - Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy 31 (3):105-126.
    This paper explores the ontology of musical improvisation (MI). MI, as process in which creative and performing activities are one and the same generative occurrence, is contrasted with the most widespread conceptual resource used in inquiries about music ontology of the Western tradition: the type/token duality (TtD). TtD, which is used for explaining the relationship between musical works (MWs) and performances, does not fit for MI. Nonetheless MI can be ontologically related to MWs. A MW can ensue from MI and (...)
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  28. added 2016-12-08
    The Works and Days; Theogony; The Shield of Herakles. [REVIEW]S. F. L. - 1959 - Review of Metaphysics 13 (1):188-189.
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  29. added 2016-12-08
    The Political Works. [REVIEW]F. D. J. - 1958 - Review of Metaphysics 12 (1):150-150.
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  30. added 2016-12-08
    Rameau's Nephew and Other Works. [REVIEW]T. E. - 1956 - Review of Metaphysics 10 (2):361-361.
  31. added 2016-12-05
    Later Works. [REVIEW]R. D. - 1956 - Review of Metaphysics 10 (2):357-357.
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  32. added 2016-10-31
    Musical Perdurantism and the Problem of Intermittent Existence.Alexey Aliyev - 2017 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 94 (1-2):83-100.
    Recently, a number of philosophers have defended a novel, materialist view on the nature of musical works—musical perdurantism. According to this view, musical works are a peculiar kind of concreta, namely perduring mereological sums of performances and/or other concrete entities. One problem facing musical perdurantism stems from the thought that if this view is correct, then virtually no musical work can exist in a continuous, non-intermittent fashion. The aim of this paper is to expound this problem and show that it (...)
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  33. added 2016-03-04
    Unperformable Works and the Ontology of Music.Wesley D. Cray - 2016 - British Journal of Aesthetics 56 (1):67-81.
    Some artworks—works of music, theatre, dance, and the like—are works for performance. Some works for performance are, I contend, unperformable. Some such works are unperformable by beings like us; others are unperformable given our laws of nature; still others are unperformable given considerations of basic logic. I offer examples of works for performance—focusing, in particular, on works of music—that would fit into each of these categories, and go on to defend the claim that such ‘works’ really are genuine works, musical (...)
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  34. added 2015-08-26
    The Metaphysics of Mash‐Ups.Christopher Bartel - 2015 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 73 (3):297-308.
    Accounts of the ontology of musical works seek to uncover what metaphysically speaking a musical work is and how we should identify instances of musical works. In this article, I examine the curious case of the mash-up and seek to address two questions: are mash-ups musical works in their own right and what is the relationship between the mash-up and its source materials? As mash-ups are part of the broader tradition of rock, I situate this discussion within an ontology of (...)
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  35. added 2015-04-06
    Work and Object.Peter Lamarque - 2002 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 102 (2):141–162.
    The paper considers what kinds of things are musical, literary, pictorial and sculptural works, how they relate to physical objects or abstract types, and what their identity and survival conditions are. Works are shown to be cultural objects with essential intentional and relational properties. These essential properties are connected to conditions of production and conditions of reception, of both a generic and work-specific kind. It is argued that work-identity is value-laden, whereby essential to the survival of a work is the (...)
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  36. added 2015-03-23
    7 Musical Identity.Christopher Hogwood - 2010 - In Giselle Walker & E. S. Leedham-Green (eds.), Identity. Cambridge University Press. pp. 21--157.
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  37. added 2015-03-20
    Platonizm skrajny Juliana Dodda.Robert Koszkało - 2012 - Filo-Sofija 12 (18).
    JULIAN DODD’S MUSICAL PLATONISM The purpose of the paper is to analyse Julian Dodd’s musical Platonism in the ontology of works of music. Dodd defends two views; first, that musical works are norm-types the tokens of which are dateable, locatable patterns of sounds. Second, that musical works are entities individuated purely in terms of how they sound. The main results of the analysis is the rejection of the following Dodd’s theses: 1. that types exist eternally; 2. that they are unstructured; (...)
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  38. added 2015-03-19
    Alperson, Phil, Ed. Musical Worlds: New Directions in the Philosophy of Music.Sarah Worth - 1999 - Review of Metaphysics 53 (2):425-426.
  39. added 2015-03-19
    The Imaginary Museum of Musical Works.Roosevelt Porter - 1996 - Review of Metaphysics 49 (3):657-658.
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  40. added 2015-03-19
    Works for Performance.Paul Thom - 1990 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 38:139-156.
    The paper criticizes Platonistic accounts of musical works as sound-structures. It rejects their view that the authoring of such works is a kind of 'discovery' (Kivy) or 'selection' (Wolterstorff) or 'indication' (Levinson). Instead, the paper proposes that the authoring of any work for performance consists in the production of a token performance-directive. Works for performance are then defined as the contents of such directives.
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  41. added 2015-03-18
    The Metaphysics of Musical Works.Nikk Effingham - unknown
    Given realism about musical works, we must ask what to identify musical works with. I criticse two theories (that works are fusions of performances and that works are eternal types) before presenting my own theory identifying (that works are identical to sets). I then defend that theory against objections.
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  42. added 2015-03-18
    The Imaginary Museum of Musical Works.V. A. Howard - 1999 - International Studies in Philosophy 31 (2):145-147.
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  43. added 2015-03-17
    Fine Individuation.Carl Matheson & Ben Caplan - 2007 - British Journal of Aesthetics 47 (2):113-137.
    Jerrold Levinson argues that musical works are individuated by their context of origin. But one could just as well argue that musical works are individuated by their context of reception. Moderate contextualism, according to which musical works are individuated by context of origin but not by context of reception, thus appears to be an unstable position. And, although a more thoroughgoing contextualism, according to which musical works are individuated both by context of origin and by context of reception, faces a (...)
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  44. added 2015-03-17
    Defending Musical Platonism.Julian Dodd - 2002 - British Journal of Aesthetics 42 (4):380-402.
    This paper sees me clarify, elaborate, and defend the conclusions reached in my ‘Musical Works as Eternal Types’ in the wake of objections raised by Robert Howell, R. A. Sharpe, and Saam Trivedi. In particular, I claim that the thesis that musical works are discovered rather than created by their composers is obligatory once we commit ourselves to thinking of works of music as types, and once we properly understand the ontological nature of types and properties. The central argument of (...)
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  45. added 2015-03-17
    Against Musical Works as Eternal Types.Saam Trivedi - 2002 - British Journal of Aesthetics 42 (1):73-82.
    I criticize Julian Dodd's Platonist conception of musical works as discovered eternal types, and defend and elaborate upon Jerrold Levinson's conception of musical works as creatable indicated types. I raise broadly three sorts of worries for Dodd. First, I argue that Dodd conflates types with Platonist universals in claiming that types are eternal and discovered. Secondly, I raise worries for Dodd's Platonist claim that musical works are discovered not created. Here I argue that Dodd's claim goes against our current musical (...)
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  46. added 2015-03-17
    Musical Works as Eternal Types.Julian Dodd - 2000 - British Journal of Aesthetics 40 (4):424-440.
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  47. added 2015-03-17
    Discovery, Creation, and Musical Works.John Andrew Fisher - 1991 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 49 (2):129-136.
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  48. added 2015-03-17
    Are Musical Works Discovered?Renee Cox - 1985 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 43 (4):367-374.
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  49. added 2014-12-22
    Arbeit am Kanon: Zu Hugo Wolfs Musikkritiken.Andreas Dorschel - 2007 - Musicologica Austriaca 26:43-52.
    Cultivation of the musical canon and canonisation of truly original work can be identified as guiding principles of both Hugo Wolf’s artistic and his critical practice. The latter is shaped by classicist tropes; they may serve strategic functions as well, yet cannot be reduced to them. While he rejects the merely old-fashioned, Wolf also leads a striking attack on what he terms “modern music”. His endorsed aesthetics intertwine the old and the new.
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  50. added 2014-12-22
    Das anwesend Abwesende: Musik und Erinnerung.Andreas Dorschel - 2007 - In Resonanzen. Vom Erinnern in der Musik. Universal Edition. pp. 12-29.
    Remembrance is constitutive of music. For music emerges not as an isolated physical stimulus. Rather, it is experienced, i.e., a present musical moment is tied to its temporal antecedents. It is tempting to conceive of remembrance as repetition and as thus opposed to oblivion. Yet to memory selectivity is crucial. What is not selected, falls into oblivion. Hence as we remember we have forgotten already. The present moment evokes remembrance, and exhibits what was then in the light of what is (...)
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