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1093 found
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1 — 50 / 1093
  1. Could Slaughterbots Wipe Out Humanity? Assessment of the Global Catastrophic Risk Posed by Autonomous Weapons.Alexey Turchin - manuscript
    Recently criticisms against autonomous weapons were presented in a video in which an AI-powered drone kills a person. However, some said that this video is a distraction from the real risk of AI—the risk of unlimitedly self-improving AI systems. In this article, we analyze arguments from both sides and turn them into conditions. The following conditions are identified as leading to autonomous weapons becoming a global catastrophic risk: 1) Artificial General Intelligence (AGI) development is delayed relative to progress in narrow (...)
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  2. Identifying Ethical Issues of Nanotechnologies.Joachim Schummer - manuscript
    in: Henk ten Have (ed.), Nanotechnology: Science, Ethics and Policy Issues, Paris (UNESCO Series in Ethics of Science and Technology), 2006 (forthcoming).
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  3. Phenomenological Epistemology and Nanotechnology: Scanning Tunneling Microscopy as Hermeneutic Technics.Marina P. Banchetti - forthcoming - In Jean-Pierre Noel Llored (ed.), Ethics and Chemistry: A Multidisciplinary Investigation. London, UK:
  4. Crop Biotechnology and Developing Countries.Geeta Bharathan, Shanti Chandrashekaran, Tony May & John Bryant - forthcoming - Bioethics for Scientists.
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  5. Technological Revolutions and the Problem of Prediction.Nick Bostrom - forthcoming - Nanoethics: The Ethical and Social Implications of Nanotechnology. Wiley-Interscience, Hoboken, Nj.
  6. 2.7. Biotechnology and Society.Amit Krishna De - forthcoming - Bioethics in Asia: The Proceedings of the Unesco Asian Bioethics Conference (Abc'97) and the Who-Assisted Satellite Symposium on Medical Genetics Services, 3-8 Nov, 1997 in Kobe/Fukui, Japan, 3rd Murs Japan International Symposium, 2nd Congress of the Asi.
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  7. Who Will Gain From Biotechnology?Jack Doyle - forthcoming - Steven M. Gendel Et Al.(Hg.), Agricultural Bioethics: Implications of Agricultural Biotechnology, Ames.
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  8. Complexity and Uncertainty: A Prudential Approach to Nanotechnology.Jean-Pierre Dupuy - forthcoming - Nanoethics. The Ethical and Social Implications of Nanotechnology. New Jersey.
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  9. Deliberative Democracy and Nanotechnology.Colin Farrelly - forthcoming - Nanoethics: The Ethical and Social Implications of Nanotechnology.
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  10. Personal Choice in the Coming Era of Nanomedicine.Robert A. Freitas Jr - forthcoming - Nanoethics: The Social and Ethical Implications of Nanotechnology.
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  11. 3.4. Ethical Issues in the Generation and Utilisation of Knowledge in Biotechnology.What To Generate - forthcoming - Bioethics in Asia: The Proceedings of the Unesco Asian Bioethics Conference (Abc'97) and the Who-Assisted Satellite Symposium on Medical Genetics Services, 3-8 Nov, 1997 in Kobe/Fukui, Japan, 3rd Murs Japan International Symposium, 2nd Congress of the Asi.
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  12. Ethical Issues.Sister Margaret John Kelly - forthcoming - Scarce Medical Resources and Justice.
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  13. RoboCup: The World Cup Initiative.H. Kitano, M. Asada, Y. Kuniyoshi, I. Noda & E. Osawa - forthcoming - Proceedings of Japanese Society for Ai Symposium.
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  14. On the National Agenda: US Congressional Testimony on the Societal Implications of Nanotechnology.Ray Kurzweil - forthcoming - Nanoethics: The Ethical and Societal Implications of Nanotechnology.
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  15. In the Beginning: The US National Nanotechnology Initiative.Neal Lane & Thomas Kalil - forthcoming - Nanoethics: The Ethical and Social Implications of Nanotechnology.
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  16. Europeanizing the Ethics of Nanotechnology, Rethinking Nanoethics.Brice Laurent - forthcoming - Nanoethics: Do We Need a New Ethics for Nanotechnology?.
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  17. Nanoscience and Nanoethics: Defining the Disciplines.Patrick Lin & Fritz Allhoff - forthcoming - Nanoethics: The Ethical and Social Implications of Nanotechnology.
    This introduction provides background information on the emerging field of nanotechnology and its ethical dimensions. After defining nanotechnology and briefly discussing its status as a discipline, about which there exists a meta-controversy, this introduction turns to a discussion of the status of nanoethics and lays out particular issues of concern in the field, both current and emerging.
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  18. Synthetic Biology Marketplace: Screening Out Terrorists.S. M. Maurer - forthcoming - Bioethics Forum.
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  19. Socio-Ethical Issues: Two Conceptual Frameworks.Thomas F. McMahon - forthcoming - Profit and Responsibility: Issues in Business and Professional Ethics.
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  20. Nanotechnology and the Military.Daniel Moore - forthcoming - Nanoethics: The Ethical and Social Dimension of Nanotechnology.
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  21. Nanotechnologyand Risk: What Are the Issues?Anne Ingeborg Myhr & Roy Ambli Dalmo - forthcoming - Nanoethics: The Ethical and Social Implications of Nanotechnology.
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  22. CSR Communication–An Emerging Field.Anne Ellerup Nielsen & Christa Thomsen - forthcoming - Hermes.
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  23. The Emergence and Formation of Finnish Innovation Policy.Marja-Liisa Niinikoski - forthcoming - Emergence: Complexity and Organization.
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  24. Rethinking Assistive Technologies: Users, Environments, Digital Media, and App-Practices of Hearing.Beate Ochsner, Markus Spöhrer & Robert Stock - forthcoming - NanoEthics:1-15.
    Against the backdrop of an aging world population increasingly affected by a diverse range of abilities and disabilities as well as the rise of ubiquitous computing and digital app cultures, this paper questions how mobile technologies mediate between heterogeneous environments and sensing beings. To approach the current technological manufacturing of the senses, two lines of thought are of importance: First, there is a need to critically reflect upon the concept of assistive technologies as artifacts providing tangible solutions for a specific (...)
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  25. Foreword: Ethical Choices in Nanotechnology Development.M. C. Roco - forthcoming - Nanoethics: The Ethical and Social Implications of Nanotechnology.
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  26. The Social Scale: The Weight of Justice.Daniel Seltzer (ed.) - forthcoming - MIT Press.
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  27. The Rules of Engagement: Dialogue and Democracy in Creating Nanotechnology Futures.J. Stilgoe & J. Wilsdon - forthcoming - Nanoethics: The Ethical and Societal Implications of Nanotechnology. Wiley, Hoboken.
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  28. Some Issues.John Wiley - forthcoming - Contemporary Issues in Business Ethics.
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  29. University-Industry Relationships in Biotechnology: Convergence and Divergence in Goals and Expectations.William F. Woodman, Brian J. Reichel & Mack C. Shelley - forthcoming - Proceedings of the 1987 Iowa State University Agricultural Bioethics Symposium. Ames, Iowa: Iowa State University Press.
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  30. Who Cares for Agile Work? In/Visibilized Work Practices and Their Emancipatory Potential.Alev Coban & Klara-Aylin Wenten - 2021 - NanoEthics 15 (1):57-70.
    The future of work has become a pressing matter of concern: Researchers, business consultancies, and industrial companies are intensively studying how new work models could be best implemented to increase workplace flexibility and creativity. In particular, the agile model has become one of the “must-have” elements for re-organizing work practices, especially for technology development work. However, the implementation of agile work often comes together with strong presumptions: it is regarded as an inevitable tool that can be universally integrated into different (...)
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  31. Towards Emancipatory Technology Studies.Philipp Frey, Simon Schaupp & Klara-Aylin Wenten - 2021 - NanoEthics 15 (1):19-27.
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  32. Dialectics of Technical Emancipation—Considerations on a Reflexive, Sustainable Technology Development.Georg Jochum - 2021 - NanoEthics 15 (1):29-41.
    The modern idea of emancipation is linked to the goal of overcoming dependencies and domination. However, as argued in the article, negative dialectics of emancipation must also be problematized. The project of emancipation, as it was formulated in the Age of Enlightenment, was often particular and was associated with the establishment of new forms of domination. Especially the project of liberation from the constraints of nature through technical development led to the domination of nature. In view of the ecological crisis, (...)
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  33. Technopolitics From Below: A Framework for the Analysis of Digital Politics of Production.Simon Schaupp - 2021 - NanoEthics 15 (1):71-86.
    This article develops a multi-level framework for the analysis of a bottom-up politics of technology at the workplace. It draws on a multi-case study on algorithmic management of manual labor in manufacturing and delivery platforms in Germany. In researching how workers influenced the use of algorithmic management systems, the concept of technopolitics is developed to refer to three different arenas of negotiation: the arena of regulation, where institutional framings of technologies in production are negotiated, typically between state actors, employers’ associations, (...)
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  34. Citizen Science Fiction: The Potential of Situated Speculative Prototyping for Public Engagement on Emerging Technologies.Jantien W. Schuijer, Jacqueline E. W. Broerse & Frank Kupper - 2021 - NanoEthics 15 (1):1-18.
    In response to calls for a research and innovation system that is more open to public scrutiny, we have seen a growth of formal and informal public engagement activities in the past decades. Nevertheless, critiques of several persistent routines in public engagement continue to resurface, in particular the focus on expert knowledge, cognitive exchange, risk discourse, and understandings of public opinion as being static. In an attempt to break out of these routines, we experimented with an innovative engagement format that (...)
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  35. The Three Pillars of Functional Autonomy of Hackers.Johan Söderberg & Maxigas - 2021 - NanoEthics 15 (1):43-56.
    We propose a conceptual framework for analysing the relationship between social emancipation and alternative technology development. Key is the “functional autonomy” of the collective of users and developers of the technology vis-a-vis state and capital. We draw on previous empirical work about three hacker projects to substantiate the claim that the functional autonomy of hackers rests on three “pillars of autonomy”: technical skill, shared values, and collective memory. These three pillars sustain the autonomy of a community of hackers so that (...)
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  36. Towards a Digital Workerism: Workers’ Inquiry, Methods, and Technologies.Jamie Woodcock - 2021 - NanoEthics 15 (1):87-98.
    Digital technology is playing an increasingly visible role in the organisation of many people’s work—as well as large parts of their lives more broadly. The concerns of emancipatory technology studies, or other critical accounts of technology, are often focused on finding alternative uses of technology. In many workplace contexts—from call centres to platform work—the imperatives of capital are deeply written into these technologies. Yet at the same time, many capitalist technologies are playing a key role facilitating emerging workers’ struggles. For (...)
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  37. The Memory-Modifying Potential of Optogenetics and the Need for Neuroethics.Agnieszka K. Adamczyk & Przemysław Zawadzki - 2020 - NanoEthics 14 (3):207-225.
    Optogenetics is an invasive neuromodulation technology involving the use of light to control the activity of individual neurons. Even though optogenetics is a relatively new neuromodulation tool whose various implications have not yet been scrutinized, it has already been approved for its first clinical trials in humans. As optogenetics is being intensively investigated in animal models with the aim of developing novel brain stimulation treatments for various neurological and psychiatric disorders, it appears crucial to consider both the opportunities and dangers (...)
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  38. Textual Representation and Intertextuality of Graphene in Swedish Newspapers.Max Boholm - 2020 - NanoEthics 14 (2):185-204.
    Textual representation of graphene in Sweden’s most circulated newspapers is analyzed in 229 articles from 2004 to 2018. What is and is not said about graphene is explored through systematically identifying the lexical and grammatical patterns of sentences using the word “graphene.” Graphene is said to be a super material with certain properties, to be an object of research, commercialization, and application, and to have societal significance. Given frequent classifications of graphene as a nanomaterial in scientific discourse, there is notably (...)
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  39. Noise and Synthetic Biology: How to Deal with Stochasticity?Miguel Prado Casanova - 2020 - NanoEthics 14 (1):113-122.
    This paper explores the functional role of noise in synthetic biology and its relation to the concept of randomness. Ongoing developments in the field of synthetic biology are pursuing the re-organisation and control of biological components to make functional devices. This paper addresses the distinction between noise and randomness in reference to the functional relationships that each may play in the evolution of living and/or synthetic systems. The differentiation between noise and randomness in its constructive role, that is, between noise (...)
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  40. In Times of Crisis.Christopher Coenen - 2020 - NanoEthics 14 (2):123-128.
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  41. Neuroethics (and Beyond)—Towards Responsible Innovation.Christopher Coenen - 2020 - NanoEthics 14 (3):205-206.
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  42. The Ethics and Ontology of Synthetic Biology: a Neo-Aristotelian Perspective.Lewis Coyne - 2020 - NanoEthics 14 (1):43-55.
    This article is concerned with two interrelated questions: what, if anything, distinguishes synthetic from natural organisms, and to what extent, if any, creating the former is of moral significance. These are ontological and ethical questions, respectively. As the title indicates, I address both from a broadly neo-Aristotelian perspective, i.e. a teleological philosophy of life and virtue ethics. For brevity’s sake, I shall not argue for either philosophical position at length, but instead hope to demonstrate their legitimacy through their explanatory power. (...)
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  43. BrisSynBio Art-Science Dossier.Maria Fannin, Katy Connor, David Roden & Darian Meacham - 2020 - NanoEthics 14 (1):27-41.
    Finding avenues for collaboration and engagement between the arts and the sciences was a central theme of investigation for the Responsible Research and Innovation and Public Engagement programme at BrisSynBio, a BBSRC/EPSRC Synthetic Biology Research Centre that is now part of the Bristol BioDesign Institute at University of Bristol. The reflections and experiments that appear in this dossier are a sample of these investigations and are contributed by Maria Fannin, Katy Connor and David Roden. Darian Meacham coordinated and introduces the (...)
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  44. How Extreme Is the Precautionary Principle?Sven Ove Hansson - 2020 - NanoEthics 14 (3):245-257.
    The precautionary principle has often been described as an extreme principle that neglects science and stifles innovation. However, such an interpretation has no support in the official definitions of the principle that have been adopted by the European Union and by the signatories of international treaties on environmental protection. In these documents, the precautionary principle is a guideline specifying how to deal with certain types of scientific uncertainty. In this contribution, this approach to the precautionary principle is explicated with the (...)
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  45. Programming Away Human Rights and Responsibilities? “The Moral Machine Experiment” and the Need for a More “Humane” AV Future.Mrinalini Kochupillai, Christoph Lütge & Franziska Poszler - 2020 - NanoEthics 14 (3):285-299.
    Dilemma situations involving the choice of which human life to save in the case of unavoidable accidents are expected to arise only rarely in the context of autonomous vehicles. Nonetheless, the scientific community has devoted significant attention to finding appropriate and acceptable automated decisions in the event that AVs or drivers of AVs were indeed to face such situations. Awad and colleagues, in their now famous paper “The Moral Machine Experiment”, used a “multilingual online ‘serious game’ for collecting large-scale data (...)
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  46. What It Takes to Be a Pioneer: Ability Expectations From Brain-Computer Interface Users.Johannes Kögel & Gregor Wolbring - 2020 - NanoEthics 14 (3):227-239.
    Brain-computer interfaces are envisioned to enable new abilities of action. This potential can be fruitful in particular when it comes to restoring lost motion or communication abilities or to implementing new possibilities of action. However, BCIs do not come without presuppositions. Applying the concept of ability expectations to BCIs, a wide range of requirements on the side of the users becomes apparent. We examined these ability expectations by taking the example of therapeutic BCI users who got enrolled into BCI research (...)
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  47. Philosophy and Synthetic Biology: The BrisSynBio Experiment.Darian Meacham & Miguel Prado Casanova - 2020 - NanoEthics 14 (1):21-25.
    This article provides an overview of the relation between synthetic biology and philosophy as understood from within the Ethics, Philosophy and Responsible Innovation programme of BrisSynBio (a BBSRC/EPSCR Synthetic Biology Research Centre). It also introduces the special issue of NanoEthics devoted to synthetic biology and philosophy.
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  48. Current Debates About the Ethics of New Technology.Christopher Nathan - 2020 - NanoEthics 14 (3):241-243.
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  49. Life Cycle Assessment and Judgement.Christopher Nathan & Stuart Coles - 2020 - NanoEthics 14 (3):271-283.
    It has become a standard for researchers carrying out biotechnology projects to do a life cycle assessment. This is a process for assessing the environmental impact of a technology, product or policy. Doing so is no simple matter, and in the last decades, a rich set of methodologies has developed around LCA. However, the proper methods and meanings of the process remain contested. Preceding the development of the international standard that now governs LCA, there was a lively debate in the (...)
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  50. Art-Science Collaboration in an EPSRC/BBSRC-Funded Synthetic Biology UK Research Centre.Michael Reinsborough - 2020 - NanoEthics 14 (1):93-111.
    Here I examine the potential for art-science collaborations to be the basis for deliberative discussions on research agendas and direction. Responsible Research and Innovation has become a science policy goal in synthetic biology and several other high-profile areas of scientific research. While art-science collaborations offer the potential to engage both publics and scientists and thus possess the potential to facilitate the desired “mutual responsiveness” between researchers, institutional actors, publics and various stakeholders, there are potential challenges in effectively implementing collaborations as (...)
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