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966 found
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  1. Synthetic Biology and Therapeutic Strategies for the Degenerating Brain.Carmen Agustín-Pavón & Mark Isalan - 2014 - Bioessays 36 (10):979-990.
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  2. Laboratory Safety and Nanotechnology Workers: An Analysis of Current Guidelines in the USA.Jeong Joo Ahn, Youngjae Kim, Elizabeth A. Corley & Dietram A. Scheufele - 2016 - NanoEthics 10 (1):5-23.
    Although some regulatory frameworks for the occupational health and safety of nanotechnology workers have been developed, worker safety and health issues in these laboratory environments have received less attention than many other areas of nanotechnology regulation. In addition, workers in nanotechnology labs are likely to face unknown risks and hazards because few of the guidelines and rules for worker safety are mandatory. In this article, we provide an overview of the current health and safety guidelines for nanotechnology laboratory workers by (...)
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  3. Synthetic Biology, Genome Editing, and the Risk of Bioterrorism.Marko Ahteensuu - forthcoming - Science and Engineering Ethics:1-21.
    The SynBioSecurity argument says that synthetic biology introduces new risks of intentional misuse of synthetic pathogens and that, therefore, there is a need for extra regulations and oversight. This paper provides an analysis of the argument, sets forth a new version of it, and identifies three developments that raise biosecurity risks compared to the situation earlier. The developments include a spread of the required know-how, improved availability of the techniques, instruments and biological parts, and new technical possibilities such as “resurrecting” (...)
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  4. The Meaning of a Scientific Image: Case Study in Nanoscience a Semiotic Approach. [REVIEW]Catherine Allamel-Raffin - 2011 - NanoEthics 5 (2):165-173.
    This paper proposes a new approach for analysing daily activities in a laboratory. The case study presented is an analysis of shop-talk around a microscope. In addition to the classical approaches, such as ethnomethodology and anthropology of science, I argue that a microsemiotic approach could be useful to better understand what is at stake. The semiotic approach I shall use here was proposed by a group of Belgian semioticians: Groupe μ. This semiotic approach leads to a constructivist point of view: (...)
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  5. Nanotechnology and Society: Current and Emerging Ethical Issues.F. Allhoff & P. Lin (eds.) - 2008 - Springer.
    The essays tackle such contentious issues as environmental impact, health dangers, medical benefits, intellectual property, professional code of ethics, privacy ...
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  6. Risk, Precaution, and Emerging Technologies.Fritz Allhoff - 2009 - Studies in Ethics, Law, and Technology 3 (2).
    This paper explores a framework for thinking about risks inherent in emerging technologies; given uncertainty about the magnitude—or even nature—of those risks, deliberation about those technologies is challenged. §1 develops a conceptual framework for risk, and §2 integrates that conception into cost-benefit analysis. Given uncertainty, we are often pushed toward precautionary approaches, and such approaches are explored in §3. These first three sections are largely literature review, and then a positive argument for how to think about the relationship between risk, (...)
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  7. On the Autonomy and Justification of Nanoethics.Fritz Allhoff - 2007 - NanoEthics 1 (3):185-210.
    In this paper, I take a critical stance on the emerging field of nanoethics. After an introductory section, “Conceptual Foundations of Nanotechnology” considers the conceptual foundations of nanotechnology, arguing that nanoethics can only be as coherent as nanotechnology itself and then discussing concerns with this latter concept; the conceptual foundations of nanoethics are then explicitly addressed in “Conceptual Foundations of Nanoethics”. “Issues in Nanoethics” considers ethical issues that will be raised through nanotechnology and, in “What’s New?”, it is argued that (...)
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  8. Nanotechnology and Human Enhancement: A Symposium.Fritz Allhoff & Patrick Lin - 2008 - Nanoethics: The Ethics of Technologies That Converge at the Nanoscale 2:251-327.
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  9. Nanoethics: The Ethical and Social Implications of Nanotechnology.Fritz Allhoff, Patrick Lin, James Moor, John Weckert & Mihail C. Roco - 2007 - Wiley.
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  10. What is Nanotechnology and Why Does It Matter: From Science to Ethics.Fritz Allhoff, Patrick Lin & Daniel Moore - 2009 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    Ongoing research in nanotechnology promises both innovations and risks, potentially and profoundly changing the world. This book helps to promote a balanced understanding of this important emerging technology, offering an informed and impartial look at the technology, its science, and its social impact and ethics. Nanotechnology is crucial for the next generation of industries, financial markets, research labs, and our everyday lives; this book provides an informed and balanced look at nanotechnology and its social impact Offers a comprehensive background discussion (...)
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  11. Neuroethics and Nanoethics: Do We Risk Ethical Myopia? [REVIEW]Sheri Alpert - 2008 - Neuroethics 1 (1):55-68.
    In recent years, two distinct trajectories of bioethical inquiry have emerged: neuroethics and nanoethics. The former deals with issues in neuroscience, whereas the latter deals with issues in nanoscience and nanotechnology. In both cases, the ethical inquiries have coalesced in response to rapidly increasing scientific and engineering developments in each field. Both also present major issues for contemplation in bioethics. However, the questions are (1) how different are the ethical issues raised, and (2) is it beneficial for neuroethics and nanoethics (...)
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  12. Research, Development, and Innovation in Extremadura.Alsonso Andoni, Casas Luis, Castro Carlos & Solís Fernando - 2004 - Philosophy Today 48 (9999):16-22.
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  13. Patentable Novelty in Nanotechnology Inventions: A Legal Study in Iraq and Malaysia. [REVIEW]Nabeel Mahdi Althabhawi & Zinatul Ashiqin Zainol - 2013 - NanoEthics 7 (2):121-133.
    Nanotechnology has been facing multiple obstacles related to the applicability of patentability criteria. In this article, the authors addressed the novelty requirement in nanotechnology inventions in Iraqi and Malaysian patent acts. First, novelty was discussed to determine its applicability in the field of nanotechnology. Then, problems on nanotechnology patent application were presented along with some suggested solutions. The problems encountered in the patentability of nanotechnology inventions were summarized in two categories. First, the multidisciplinary nature of nanotechnology casts its shadow on (...)
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  14. Quibbling and the Fallacy of Critical Scholarship: Response to Thorstensen.Heidrun Åm - 2014 - NanoEthics 8 (3):251-254.
    In this text, I respond to a paper by Erik Thorstensen entitled “Public Involvement and Narrative Fallacies of Nanotechnologies.” In his paper, Thorstensen critically reviews a previous ELSA project on engagement and nanotechnology known by the acronym DEEPEN. While I agree that the ELSA community could benefit from the critical examination of earlier research, I believe the approach taken by Thorstensen is not a constructive one. My response deals with three main issues: the character of the paper, narrative theory, and (...)
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  15. Trust as Glue in Nanotechnology Governance Networks.Heidrun Åm - 2011 - NanoEthics 5 (1):115-128.
    This paper reflects on the change of relations among participants in nanotechnology governance through their participation in governance processes such as stakeholder dialogues. I show that policymaking in practice—that is, the practice of coming and working together in such stakeholder dialogues—has the potential for two-fold performative effects: it can contribute to the development of trust and mutual responsibility on the part of the involved actors, and it may bring about effects on the formation of boundaries of what is sayable and (...)
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  16. Trust in Nanotechnology? On Trust as Analytical Tool in Social Research on Emerging Technologies.Trond Grønli Åm - 2011 - NanoEthics 5 (1):15-28.
    Trust has become an important aspect of evaluating the relationship between lay public and technology implementation. Experiences have shown that a focus on trust provides a richer understanding of reasons for backlashes of technology in society than a mere focus of public understanding of risks and science communication. Therefore, trust is also widely used as a key concept for understanding and predicting trust or distrust in emerging technologies. But whereas trust broadens the scope for understanding established technologies with well-defined questions (...)
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  17. An Update of Public Perceptions of Synthetic Biology: Still Undecided?Mirko Ancillotti, Virgil Rerimassie, Stefanie B. Seitz & Walburg Steurer - 2016 - NanoEthics 10 (3):309-325.
    The discourse on the fundamental issues raised by synthetic biology, such as biosafety and biosecurity, intellectual property, environmental consequences and ethical and societal implications, is still open and controversial. This, coupled with the potential and risks the field holds, makes it one of the hottest topics in technology assessment today. How a new technology is perceived by the public influences the manner in which its products and applications will be received. Therefore, it is important to learn how people perceive synthetic (...)
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  18. Nanotechnology in Context.Phd Andrew Maynard - 2007 - Lahey Clinic Medical Ethics Journal 14 (3):6-7.
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  19. Changing Me Softly: Making Sense of Soft Regulation and Compliance in the Italian Nanotechnology Sector.Simone Arnaldi - 2017 - NanoEthics 11 (1):3-16.
    Soft regulation has increased its importance in science and technology governance. Despite such indisputable significance, the literature on technology policy and regulation so far seems to have dedicated only a limited attention to a systematic understanding of the factors affecting compliance with these soft rules. This article addresses this limitation. By way of a literature scoping exercise, we propose a taxonomy of the mechanisms affecting compliance with soft regulation. We subsequently apply the taxonomy as a guide to examine the opinions (...)
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  20. Nanotechnology, Uncertainty and Regulation. A Guest Editorial.Simone Arnaldi & Alessia Muratorio - 2013 - NanoEthics 7 (3):173-175.
    Nanotechnology has been established as a priority research and policy focus, cutting across several R&D fields from pharmaceutics, food and electronics. The raise of nanotechnologies has been accompanied by an enduring uncertainty characterising the developments of the scientific knowledge related to this field, as well as the social trajectories of technological applications. Such a condition inevitably affects regulatory responses to such technologies, their development and their uses. This special issue addresses this junction between uncertainty and regulation. With no ambition of (...)
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  21. Nanotechnologies and Equal Access to Healthcare.Simone Arnaldi & Mariassunta Piccinni - 2009 - Studies in Ethics, Law, and Technology 3 (3).
    This editorial introduces a collection of articles that is a collaborative effort to discuss the impact of nanotechnology-based innovation on biomedical products development, on public health infrastructure, and on healthcare service delivery. The goal of this special issue of Studies in Ethics, Law, and Technology is to assess the effects of these transformations on the equity of access to healthcare, on the potential and actual disparities, especially at the international level, as well as to examine the possible strategies to make (...)
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  22. Mega-Sized Concerns From the Nano-Sized World: The Intersection of Nano- and Environmental Ethics.Peter Attia - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):1007-1016.
    As rapid advances in nanotechnology are made, we must set guidelines to balance the interests of both human beneficiaries and the environment by combining nanoethics and environmental ethics. In this paper, I reject Leopoldian holism as a practical environmental ethic with which to gauge nanotechnologies because, as a nonanthropocentric ethic, it does not value the humans who will actually use the ethic. Weak anthropocentrism is suggested as a reasonable alternative to ethics without a substantial human interest, as it treats nonhuman (...)
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  23. Is Nanotechnology Giving Rise to New Ethical Problems?Fabio Bacchini - 2013 - NanoEthics 7 (2):107-119.
    In this paper I focus on the question of whether nanotechnology is giving rise to new ethical problems rather than merely to new instances of old ethical problems. Firstly, I demonstrate how important it is to make a general distinction between new ethical problems and new instances of old problems. Secondly, I propose one possible way of interpreting the distinction and offer a definition of a “new ethical problem”. Thirdly, I examine whether there is good reason to claim that nanotechnology (...)
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  24. The Newness of Nanoethics and the Consequentialist Bias.Fabio Bacchini - 2013 - Etica E Politica 15 (1):321-332.
    While many authors agree that a necessary condition for considering nanoethics as a new distinct field of inquiry is that some ethical problem arising in nanotechnology be new, I argue that we have good reasons to consider nanoethics as a new distinct field of applied ethics, although we have no good reason to think that any new ethical problem shows up in it. In fact, I claim that nanoethics will ask us to reshape our ways of conceiving reality, the relationship (...)
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  25. The Gene Hunters: Biotechnology and the Scramble for SeedsCalestous Juma.Richard J. Badham - 1991 - Isis 82 (4):709-710.
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  26. Ethical Issues in the Psychotherapies. [REVIEW]Maria Baghramian - 1990 - Philosophical Books 31 (2):107-108.
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  27. Cognitive Expansion Technologies.William Bainbridge - 2008 - Journal of Evolution and Technology 19 (1):8-16.
    In ancient times, at great effort over the span of many years, people learned to do arithmetic, to read, to write, and to measure reality with rulers and eventually clocks. A person who cannot handle any of these cognitive tools is a very different creature from somebody who can. The changes happening now will be at least as significant, and will occur much faster, probably within a single human lifetime. This article will consider cutting-edge research being done today, and extrapolate (...)
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  28. Nanotechnology: Societal Implications—Individual Perspectives.William Sims Bainbridge - unknown
    Managing the Nanotechnology Revolution: Consider the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Criteria.................................................................................. 24..
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  29. Dissolution of the Nature-Technology Dichotomy? Perspectives From an Everyday Understanding of Nature on Nanotechnology.D. Baird - 2004 - In Baird D. (ed.), Discovering the Nanoscale. Ios. pp. 209.
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  30. Socio-Ethical Education in Nanotechnology Engineering Programmes: A Case Study in Malaysia. [REVIEW]Balamuralithara Balakrishnan, Pek Hoon Er & Punita Visvanathan - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):1341-1355.
    The unique properties of nanotechnology have made nanotechnology education and its related subjects increasingly important not only for students but for mankind at large. This particular technology brings educators to work together to prepare and produce competent engineers and scientists for this field. One of the key challenges in nanotechnology engineering is to produce graduate students who are not only competent in technical knowledge but possess the necessary attitude and awareness toward the social and ethical issues related to nanotechnology. In (...)
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  31. Industry, Innovation and Social Values.Dr Harvey E. Bale Jr - 2005 - Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (1):31-40.
    Remaining important tasks in finding and developing new drugs and vaccines for HIV/AIDS, malaria, cancer and other diseases require continued industry research and development. Industry’s research and development pipeline has produced drugs that have saved AIDS victims previously facing certain death, but still no cure nor vaccine is yet available. Experience with the process of research and development indicates that it requires more than a decade of development to produce a new drug with costs in the hundreds of millions of (...)
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  32. Industry, Innovation and Social Values.Harvey E. Bale - 2005 - Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (1):31-40.
    Remaining important tasks in finding and developing new drugs and vaccines for HIV/AIDS, malaria, cancer and other diseases require continued industry research and development. Industry’s research and development pipeline has produced drugs that have saved AIDS victims previously facing certain death, but still no cure nor vaccine is yet available. Experience with the process of research and development indicates that it requires more than a decade of development to produce a new drug with costs in the hundreds of millions of (...)
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  33. Making Life: A Comment on 'Playing God in Frankenstein's Footsteps: Synthetic Biology and the Meaning of Life' by Henk van den Belt (2009).Philip Ball - 2010 - NanoEthics 4 (2):129-132.
    Van den Belt recently examined the notion that synthetic biology and the creation of ‘artificial’ organisms are examples of scientists ‘playing God’. Here I respond to some of the issues he raises, including some of his comments on my previous discussions of the value of the term ‘life’ as a scientific concept.
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  34. Government and Markets: Toward a New Theory of Regulation.Edward J. Balleisen & David A. Moss (eds.) - 2009 - Cambridge University Press.
    After two generations of emphasis on governmental inefficiency and the need for deregulation, we now see growing interest in the possibility of constructive governance, alongside public calls for new, smarter regulation. Yet there is a real danger that regulatory reforms will be rooted in outdated ideas. As the financial crisis has shown, neither traditional market failure models nor public choice theory, by themselves, sufficiently inform or explain our current regulatory challenges. Regulatory studies, long neglected in an atmosphere focused on deregulatory (...)
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  35. Integration Research for Natural Resource Management in Australia: An Introduction to New Challenges for Research Practice.Gabriele Bammer, Deborah O'Connell, Alice Roughley & Geoff Syme - 2005 - Journal of Research Practice 1 (2):Article - E1.
    This special issue of the Journal of Research Practice focuses on integration research, also known as integrated or integrative research. Integration between disciplines and between research and practice is increasingly recognised as essential to tackle complex problems more effectively. But there is little to guide researchers about how to undertake integration research. This special issue provides a number of case studies of how integration has been approached and exemplifies the challenges facing researchers seeking to embed integration in both existing and (...)
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  36. Quand le Public Prend Ses Distances Avec la Participation.Rémi Barbier - 2005 - Natures Sciences Sociétés 13 (3):258-265.
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  37. Ethical Assessment of Emerging Technologies. Appraising the Moral Plausibility of Technological Visions. [REVIEW]Rosangela Barcaro - 2017 - NanoEthics 11 (1):17-18.
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  38. CRISPR/Cas9 Genome Editing – New and Old Ethical Issues Arising From a Revolutionary Technology.Martina Baumann - 2016 - NanoEthics 10 (2):139-159.
    Although germline editing has been the subject of debate ever since the 1980s, it tended to be based rather on speculative assumptions until April 2015, when CRISPR/Cas9 technology was used to modify human embryos for the first time. This article combines knowledge about the technical and scientific state of the art, economic considerations, the legal framework and aspects of clinical reality. A scenario will be elaborated as a means of identifying key ethical implications of CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing in humans and (...)
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  39. Developing a National Wireless Regulatory Framework: A Law and Economics Approach.T. Randolph Beard, George S. Ford, Thomas Koutsky & Lawrence J. Spiwak - unknown
    In this article, we provide a focused economic analysis of the welfare effect of state and local regulation on communications services and, in particular, on the wireless segment of the telecommunications industry. We find that when local regulation in one jurisdiction has sufficiently large "extra-jurisdictional" effects in other locations, overall social welfare can be reduced even if state and local governments act as efficient regulators. This finding is important because it shows that the debate over the proper regulatory framework for (...)
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  40. World Risk Society and Manufactured Uncertainties.Ulrich Beck - 2009 - Iris 1 (2):291-299.
    The dominance of the modern concept of risk and calculability is challenged by and has to be distinguished from “manufactured uncertainties.” Typically today, conflict and controversy flare up around this particular type of new manufactured risk. Neither natural disasters – threats – coming from the outside and thus attributable to God or nature have this effect any longer. Nor do the specific calculable uncertainties – “risks” – which are determinable with actuarial precision interms of a probability calculus backed up by (...)
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  41. Changing Nature's Course: The Ethical Challenge of Biotechnology.Gerhold K. Becker (ed.) - 1996 - Columbia University Press.
    Biotechnology marks a new scientific revolution. It holds the promise of generating resources to meet our needs in the fight against hunger, disease and environmental disasters.
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  42. The Precautionary Principle as a Guideline for Decision-Making About Food Safety in an International Context.V. Beekman, J. G. Roest & J. Berg - unknown
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  43. The Social and Ethical Acceptability of NBICs for Purposes of Human Enhancement: Why Does the Debate Remain Mired in Impasse? [REVIEW]Jean-Pierre Béland, Johane Patenaude, Georges Legault, Patrick Boissy & Monelle Parent - 2011 - NanoEthics 5 (3):295-307.
    The emergence and development of convergent technologies for the purpose of improving human performance, including nanotechnology, biotechnology, information sciences, and cognitive science (NBICs), open up new horizons in the debates and moral arguments that must be engaged by philosophers who hope to take seriously the question of the ethical and social acceptability of these technologies. This article advances an analysis of the factors that contribute to confusion and discord on the topic, in order to help in understanding why arguments that (...)
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  44. Philosophy of Biotechnology.H. Belt - unknown
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  45. Regulating Emerging and Future Technologies in the Present.Michael Bennett, Jake Gatof, Diana Bowman & Karinne Ludlow - 2015 - NanoEthics 9 (2):151-163.
    Scientific knowledge and technological expertise continue to evolve rapidly. Such innovation gives rise to new benefits as well as risks, at an ever-increasing pace. Within this context, regulatory regimes must function in order to address policymakers’ objectives. Innovation, though, can challenge the functioning and effectiveness of regulatory regimes. Questions over fit, effectiveness, and capacity of these regimes to ensure the safe entry of such technologies, and their products, onto the market will be asked in parallel to their development. With this (...)
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  46. Discipline-Building in Synthetic Biology.Bernadette Bensaude Vincent - 2013 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 44 (2):122-129.
    Despite the multidisciplinary dimension of the kinds of research conducted under the umbrella of synthetic biology, the US-based founders of this new research area adopted a disciplinary profile to shape its institutional identity. In so doing they took inspiration from two already established fields with very different disciplinary patterns. The analogy with synthetic chemistry suggested by the term ‘synthetic biology’ is not the only model. Information technology is clearly another source of inspiration. The purpose of the paper, with its focus (...)
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  47. Decentring Nanoethics Toward Objects.Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent - 2013 - Etica E Politica 15 (1):310-320.
    It is now widely accepted that Research & Development in nanotechnology and biotechnology should be accompanied by research programs in ethics. This paper first critically assesses the initiatives that characterize this “ethical turn” by clarifying its underlying philosophical assump-tions and its consequences. Current trends in nanoethics enhance the concern for responsibility and develop an attitude of prudence. However nanoethics focused as it is on designers’ responsibility, reinvigorates the anthropocentric modern ideal of man as the lord of nature and master of (...)
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  48. Nanotechnology: A New Regime for the Public in Science?Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent - 2012 - Scientiae Studia 10 (SPE):85-94.
    "Public engagement in science" is one of the buzzwords that, since 2000, has been used in nanotechnology programs. To what extent does public engagement disrupt the traditional relations between science and the public? This paper briefly contrasts the traditional model of science communication - the diffusionist model - that prevailed in the twentieth century and the new model - the participatory model - that tends to prevail nowadays. Then it will try to disentangle the assumptions underlying the public dialogue initiated (...)
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  49. Self-Assembly, Self-Organization: Nanotechnology and Vitalism. [REVIEW]Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent - 2009 - NanoEthics 3 (1):31-42.
    Over the past decades, self-assembly has attracted a lot of research attention and transformed the relations between chemistry, materials science and biology. The paper explores the impact of the current interest in self-assembly techniques on the traditional debate over the nature of life. The first section describes three different research programs of self-assembly in nanotechnology in order to characterize their metaphysical implications: (1) Hybridization (using the building blocks of living systems for making devices and machines) ; (2) Biomimetics (making artifacts (...)
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  50. Nanobots and Nanotubes: Two Alternative Biomimetic Paradigms of Nanotechnology.Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent - 2007 - In Jessica Riskin (ed.), Genesis Redux: Essays in the History and Philosophy of Artificial Life. University of Chicago Press. pp. 221--236.
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