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  1. added 2019-09-22
    Self, Narrative, and the Culture of Therapy.Somogy Varga - 2014 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 21 (2):161-163.
  2. added 2019-09-19
    Re-Authoring Narrative Therapy.Daniel D. Hutto & Shaun Gallagher - 2017 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 24 (2):157-167.
    How we narrate our lives can affect us, for good or ill. Our narrative practices make an undeniable difference to our psychosocial well-being. All so-called "talking cures" – including traditional psychoanalytic and psychodynamic approaches to therapy and newer techniques – are motivated by this insight about the power of personal narratives. All therapies of the discursive ilk make use of narratives, in one way or another, as a means of enabling individuals to frame, or reframe, and to manage their life (...)
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  3. added 2019-09-19
    The Politics of 'People with Lived Experience' Experiential Authority and the Risks of Strategic Essentialism.Jijian Voronka - 2016 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 23 (3):189-201.
    This paper explores the implications that arise when those of us with experiences of distress/mental health system encounters deploy lived experience as expertise to produce research. In recent years, some mental health service and research systems have conceded to disability rights demands of ‘nothing about us without us,’ and slowly, select people with direct contact with psychiatric systems and experiences of distress have been incorporated as experts by experience into mental health assemblages. In my own professional encounters, I have largely (...)
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  4. added 2019-09-19
    Narrative Research and Service User/Survivor Stories: A New Frontier for Research Ethics?Sarah Carr - 2016 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 23 (3):233-236.
    Russo suggests that the personal narratives of those who have experienced mental and emotional distress now constitute a diverse and dispersed, nonetheless considerable, body of knowledge that is of interest to non–user/survivor researchers. The issues she raises about the potential use of that knowledge pose practical and ethical challenges to both user/survivor researchers and those from other research traditions. On reading this paper, I became conscious of my own work, where I have explored my personal experiences in the context of (...)
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  5. added 2019-09-19
    Telling Stories.Clare Shaw - 2016 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 23 (3):277-279.
    I am a writer and an educationalist: a poet, an author, a trainer, and an activist. For the last 15 years, I have authored papers and books, delivered training c ourses, and spoken to staff and service users in services from prisons to community projects. Although my work is informed by many sources of knowledge, my own experiences of suicidality and self-injury are at its core.The invitation to respond to Fitzpatrick’s article included the specification that it must be ‘academically rigorous.’ (...)
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  6. added 2019-09-19
    Experience as 'Expert' Knowledge: A Critical Understanding of Survivor Research in Mental Health.Bindhulakshmi Pattadath - 2016 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 23 (3):203-205.
    Voronka critically analyzes the risk of strategic essentialism while considering ‘lived experience’ as expert knowledge. Although strategic essentialism seems to be a useful category to create political solidarity among a marginalized group, it also holds the risk of essentializing experiences, and thus works against the same premises from where critical questions against dominant knowledge systems begin. While recognizing this risk, Voronka also discusses its contextual usage while dealing with a constituency—the survivors of the mental health system—that is fragile. In this (...)
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  7. added 2019-09-19
    Responding to Suicide.R. Srivatsan - 2016 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 23 (3):281-284.
    Scott Fitzpatrick covers the terrain spanning suicide prevention efforts and survivor narratives. He sets up a binary with one pole as biomedical perspectives on suicide, immediately judged as inadequate, and then seeks to examine at the opposite pole, the texture, history, and policy drivers of the current turn toward survivor narratives. He argues that privileging one specific type of recovery narrative, that is, self- formation, aligns the discourse of suicide narratives to an overall liberal policy orientation of suicide prevention and (...)
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  8. added 2019-09-11
    Narrative Explanations: The Case for Causality.Georg Gangl - forthcoming - Journal of the Philosophy of History 13.
    In this paper I argue that historiography employs causal narrative explanations just as other historical sciences such as evolutionary biology or paleontology do. There is a logic of explanation common to all these sciences that centers on causal explanation of unique and unrepeatable events. The explanandum of historiography can further be understood as mechanism in the sense developed by Stuart Glennan and others in recent years. However, causal explanation is not the only way historiography relates to the past. Arthur Danto (...)
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  9. added 2019-03-07
    Mechanism-Based Theorizing and Generalization From Case Studies.Petri Ylikoski - forthcoming - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A.
    Generalization from a case study is a perennial issue in the methodology of the social sciences. The case study is one of the most important research designs in many social scientific fields, but no shared understanding exists of the epistemic import of case studies. This article suggests that the idea of mechanism-based theorizing provides a fruitful basis for understanding how case studies contribute to a general understanding of social phenomena. This approach is illustrated with a re- construction of Espeland and (...)
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  10. added 2018-08-02
    Analytic Narratives: What They Are and How They Contribute to Historical Explanation.Philippe Mongin - 2019 - In Claude Diebolt & Michael Haupert (eds.), Handbook of Cliometrics. Berlin: Springer.
    The expression "analytic narratives" is used to refer to a range of quite recent studies that lie on the boundaries between history, political science, and economics. These studies purport to explain specific historical events by combining the usual narrative approach of historians with the analytic tools that economists and political scientists draw from formal rational choice theories. Game theory, especially of the extensive form version, is currently prominent among these tools, but there is nothing inevitable about such a technical choice. (...)
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  11. added 2018-07-09
    How-Possibly Explanation in Biology: Lessons From Wilhelm His’s ‘Simple Experiments’ Models.Christopher Pearson - 2018 - Philosophy, Theory, and Practice in Biology 10 (4).
    A common view of how-possibly explanations in biology treats them as explanatorily incomplete. In addition to this interpretation of how-possibly explanation, I argue that there is another interpretation, one which features what I term “explanatory strategies.” This strategy-centered interpretation of how-possibly explanation centers on there being a different explanatory context within which how-possibly explanations are offered. I contend that, in conditions where this strategy context is recognized, how-possibly explanations can be understood as complete explanations. I defend this alternative interpretation by (...)
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  12. added 2017-08-31
    Philosophy of History and History of Philosophy of Science.Thomas Uebel - 2017 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 7 (1):1-30.
    hilosophy of history and history of philosophy of science make for an interesting case of “mutual containment”: the former is an object of inquiry for the latter, and the latter is subject to the demands of the former. This article discusses a seminal turn in past philosophy of history with an eye to the practice of historians of philosophy of science. The narrative turn by Danto and Mink represents both a liberation for historians and a new challenge to the objectivity (...)
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  13. added 2017-06-12
    Symmetry Breaking and the Emergence of Path-Dependence.Hugh Desmond - 2017 - Synthese (10):4101-4131.
    Path-dependence offers a promising way of understanding the role historicity plays in explanation, namely, how the past states of a process can matter in the explanation of a given outcome. The two main existing accounts of path-dependence have sought to present it either in terms of dynamic landscapes or branching trees. However, the notions of landscape and tree both have serious limitations and have been criticized. The framework of causal networks is both more fundamental and more general that that of (...)
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  14. added 2017-03-21
    Literal Meaning: Semantics and Narrative in Biblical Law and Modern Jurisprudence.Bernard S. Jackson - 2000 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 13 (4):433-457.
    The modern conception of the "Rule of Law'' takes law to consist in rules known in advance. This latter characteristic assumes that, for the most part, the meaning of such rules is unproblematic (Hart's "core of settled meaning''), this usually being understood as a function of "literal meaning''. A quite different model exists in the Bible: the early rules display "oral residue'', and their meaning, I argue, is constructed in "narrative'' rather than "semantic'' terms: instead of asking: "what situations do (...)
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  15. added 2017-03-21
    Law, Fact and Narrative Coherence.Bernard S. Jackson - 1988 - Liverpool: Deborah Charles Publications.
    his book develops an account of legal reasoning based on underlying narrative patterns, and compares other such approaches in legal philosophy, psychology and history. Download full ToC and Preface from http://www.legaltheory.demon.co.uk/books_lfnc.html.
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  16. added 2016-12-07
    Narrative Between Action and Transformation: A. J. Greimas' Narratological Models.Rafael Duarte Oliveira Venancio - 2016 - SSRN Electronic Journal 2016.
    The French theorist A. J. Greimas, inspired by such studies, is considered one of the founders of Narratology through the construction of models of analysis where these invariables would be centered in the subject of the narrative and based on the action and the transformation of them. The objective of the present essay is to analyze the ideas of Greimas, as well as to look for the logical mechanism that resides in each model.
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  17. added 2016-04-27
    How Do Narratives and Brains Mutually Influence Each Other? Taking Both the ‘Neuroscientific Turn’ and the ‘Narrative Turn’ in Explaining Bio-Political Orders.Machiel Keestra - manuscript
    Introduction: the neuroscientific turn in political science The observation that brains and political orders are interdependent is almost trivial. Obviously, political orders require brain processes in order to emerge and to remain in place, as these processes enable action and cognition. Conversely, every since Aristotle coined man as “by nature a political animal” (Aristotle, Pol.: 1252a 3; cf. Eth. Nic.: 1097b 11), this also suggests that the political engagements of this animal has likely consequences for its natural development, including the (...)
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  18. added 2015-03-25
    Narrativity and the Symbolic Vacuum.Stefan Lukits - 2011 - Philosophy and Theology 23 (1):167-183.
    “Narrativity and the Symbolic Vacuum” examines the descriptive and the prescriptive narrativity claim in the context of a claim that there are narratives in the biblical literature that resist both. The descriptive narrativity claim maintains that it is not an option for a person to conceive of their life without narrative coherence. The prescriptive claim holds that narrativity is a necessary condition for a good and successful human life. Phenomenological thought and Aristotelian virtue ethics, expressing a critical stance towards modernity (...)
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  19. added 2015-03-07
    Narrative in the Historical Sciences: A Working Interdisciplinary Bibliography.Robert J. O'Hara - 1998 - SSRN Electronic Journal 2542010.
    Models of scientific explanation derived from the physical sciences are often poorly suited to the historical sciences—to the fields William Whewell called the palaetiological sciences. A listing of 27 titles that explore the nature of narrative understanding across a range of scientific disciplines—from cosmology to paleontology to economics—attests to the importance of narrative epistemology in the sciences.
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  20. added 2015-02-28
    Telling the Tree: Narrative Representation and the Study of Evolutionary History.Robert J. O'Hara - 1992 - Biology and Philosophy 7 (2): 135–160.
    Accounts of the evolutionary past have as much in common with works of narrative history as they do with works of science. Awareness of the narrative character of evolutionary writing leads to the discovery of a host of fascinating and hitherto unrecognized problems in the representation of evolutionary history, problems associated with the writing of narrative. These problems include selective attention, narrative perspective, foregrounding and backgrounding, differential resolution, and the establishment of a canon of important events. The narrative aspects of (...)
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  21. added 2015-02-28
    Homage to Clio, or, Toward an Historical Philosophy for Evolutionary Biology.Robert J. O'Hara - 1988 - Systematic Zoology 37 (2): 142–155.
    Discussions of the theory and practice of systematics and evolutionary biology have heretofore revolved around the views of philosophers of science. I reexamine these issues from the different perspective of the philosophy of history. Just as philosophers of history distinguish between chronicle (non-interpretive or non-explanatory writing) and narrative history (interpretive or explanatory writing), I distinguish between evolutionary chronicle (cladograms, broadly construed) and narrative evolutionary history. Systematics is the discipline which estimates the evolutionary chronicle. ¶ Explanations of the events described in (...)
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  22. added 2014-05-29
    Reading Across Borders: Storytelling and Knowledges of Resistance (Review).Susan E. Babbitt - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (3):203-206.
  23. added 2014-03-28
    A Pessimistic Induction Against Scientific Antirealism.Seungbae Park - 2014 - Organon F: Medzinárodný Časopis Pre Analytickú Filozofiu 21 (1):3-21.
    There are nine antirealist explanations of the success of science in the literature. I raise difficulties against all of them except the latest one, and then construct a pessimistic induction that the latest one will turn out to be problematic because its eight forerunners turned out to be problematic. This pessimistic induction is on a par with the traditional pessimistic induction that successful present scientific theories will be revealed to be false because successful past scientific theories were revealed to be (...)
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  24. added 2014-03-23
    Narrative Explanation.J. David Velleman - 2003 - Philosophical Review 112 (1):1-25.
    A story does more than recount events; it recounts events in a way that renders them intelligible, thus conveying not just information but also understanding. We might therefore be tempted to describe narrative as a genre of explanation. When the police invite a suspect to “tell his story,” they are asking him to explain the blood on his shirt or his absence from home on the night of the murder; and whether he is judged to have a “good story” will (...)
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  25. added 2014-03-20
    I Felt so Tall Within: Anthroplogy in Slave Narratives.Paul Richard Blum - 2013 - Annals of Cultural Studies (Roczniki Kulturoznawcze) 4 (2):21-39.
  26. added 2014-03-10
    Counterfactual Narrative Explanation.Daniel Dohrn - 2009 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 67 (1):37-47.
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  27. added 2012-07-08
    The Logic of Explanation in Anthropology.S. T. Goh - 1970 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 13 (1-4):339 – 359.
    This paper is about the problem of explanation in anthropology. There are, broadly speaking, three theories of explanation, namely, the scientific theory, the historical theory, and finally what I have decided to call the phenomenological theory, after M. Natanson. The author argues that none of the three theories is adequate by itself to encompass the complex nature of anthropological science. The three theories correspond roughly to at least three different types of questions raised by anthropologists, and this being the case (...)
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  28. added 2012-03-03
    A Touch of the Dramatic.Tamás Demeter - 2011 - In Josef Steiff (ed.), Sherlock Holmes and Philosophy. Open Court.
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  29. added 2008-12-31
    1. Narrative Explanation and its Malcontents.David Carr - 2008 - History and Theory 47 (1):19–30.
    In this paper I look at narrative as a mode of explanation and at various ways in which the explanatory value of narrative has been criticized. I begin with the roots of narrative explanation in everyday action, experience, and discourse, illustrating it with the help of a simple example. I try to show how narrative explanation is transformed and complicated by circumstances that take us beyond the everyday into such realms as jurisprudence, journalism, and history. I give an account of (...)
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