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Summary Natural law theories are mostly based on the philosophical teachings of Thomas Aquinas which is a Christian philosopher. His interpretation distinguishes divine law and natural law which is the law that human beings can understand to the opposite of divine law which is understood by God only. Natural law teaches us how the behavior of humans is dictated by nature but with a closely connection to God. For example, procreation is the goal of every successful marriage to be established and should not exist otherwise. Suicide is considered as unnatural and against human nature which cannot agree with it. Natural law is the behavior of mankind in its pure and righteous way.
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  1. Power-Ing Up Neo-Aristotelian Natural Goodness.Ben Page - forthcoming - Philosophical Studies.
    Something is good insofar as it achieves its end, so says a neo-Aristotelian view of goodness. Powers/dispositions are paradigm cases of entities that have an end, so say many metaphysicians. A question therefore arises, namely, can one account for neo-Aristotelian goodness in terms of an ontology of powers? This is what I shall begin to explore in this paper. I will first provide a brief explication of both neo-Aristotelian goodness and the metaphysics of powers, before turning to investigate whether one (...)
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  2. Kant and Aquinas on Suicide and Assisted Reproductive Technologies.Claudia Meadows - 2020 - Dissertation, University of Houston-Downtown
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  3. Technological Innovation and Natural Law.Philip Woodward - 2020 - Philosophia Reformata 85 (2):138-156.
    I discuss three tiers of technological innovation: mild innovation, or the acceleration by technology of a human activity aimed at a good; moderate innovation, or the obviation by technology of an activity aimed at a good; and radical innovation, or the altering by technology of the human condition so as to change what counts as a good. I argue that it is impossible to morally assess proposed innovations within any of these three tiers unless we rehabilitate a natural-law ethical framework. (...)
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  4. On the Law of Nature: A Demonstrative Method.Niels Hemmingsen - 2018 - Grand Rapids: CLP Academic.
  5. The Theological Origins of Liberalism.Ismail Kurun - 2016 - Lanham, USA: Lexington Books.
    This book offers a critical survey of the origins of liberalism. It challenges the widely-held belief among philosophers that liberalism developed in opposition to religion. Beginning with the Protestant Reformation, it illustrates how Christian thinkers reinterpreted Christianity and used a set of biblical presuppositions from their reinterpretations to develop the first liberal ideas, starting a process that culminates in the birth of the first systematic liberal political philosophy in the writings of a Christian philosopher, John Locke. -/- Foreworded by Michael (...)
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  6. Adam Smith, Theology, and Natural Law Ethics.John Haldane - 2011 - In Paul Oslington (ed.), Adam Smith as Theologian. Routledge.
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  7. Review of Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia: A Natural Law Ethics Approach. [REVIEW]Craig Paterson - 2010 - Ethics and Medicine 26 (1):23-4.
    As medical technology advances and severely injured or ill people can be kept alive and functioning long beyond what was previously medically possible, the debate surrounding the ethics of end-of-life care and quality-of-life issues has grown more urgent. In this lucid and vigorous book, Craig Paterson discusses assisted suicide and euthanasia from a fully fledged but non-dogmatic secular natural law perspective. He rehabilitates and revitalises the natural law approach to moral reasoning by developing a pluralistic account of just why we (...)
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  8. Paterson, Craig: Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia: A Natural Law Ethics Approach. [REVIEW]Susanna Maria Taraschi - 2010 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 31 (3):245-247.
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  9. Craig Paterson - Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia: A Natural Law Ethics Approach. [REVIEW]Glenys Williams - 2009 - King's Law Journal 20 (3):553-8.
    Extended review of Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia: A Natural Law Ethics Approach by Craig Paterson. Ashgate, 2008.
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  10. Emerson on Creativity in Thought and Action.H. G. Callaway - 2006 - In R.W. Emerson, The Conduct of Life: A Philosophical Reading.
    The opening essay of Emerson’s 1860 book, The Conduct of Life, posed, in that fateful year of threatening Civil War and disunion, the philosophical problem of human freedom and fate. The essay “Fate” is followed in the present book by a series of essays on related themes, including: “Power,” “Wealth,” “Culture,” “Worship,” “Beauty” and “Illusions.” The central question of the volume is, “How shall I live?” Appreciating both our freedom and its limits, we understand the vitality of power to acquire (...)
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  11. Euthanasia, Ethics, and Public Policy: An Argument Against Legalisation.John Keown - 2002 - Cambridge University Press.
    Whether the law should permit voluntary euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide is one of the most vital questions facing all modern societies. Internationally, the main obstacle to legalisation has proved to be the objection that, even if they were morally acceptable in certain 'hard cases', voluntary euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide could not be effectively controlled; society would slide down a 'slippery slope' to the killing of patients who did not make a free and informed request, or for whom palliative care would (...)
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  12. Moral Absolutism and Ectopic Pregnancy.Christopher Kaczor - 2001 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 26 (1):61 – 74.
    If one accepts a version of absolutism that excludes the intentional killing of any innocent human person from conception to natural death, ectopic pregnancy poses vexing difficulties. Given that the embryonic life almost certainly will die anyway, how can one retain ones moral principle and yet adequately respond to a situation that gravely threatens the life of the mother and her future fertility? The four options of treatment most often discussed in the literature are non-intervention, salpingectomy (removal of tube with (...)
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  13. Aristotle, Feminism and Natural Law Theory.Peter Tumulty - 1981 - New Scholasticism 55 (4):450-464.
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  14. Zur Wirkungsgeschichte des Naturrechts in Deutschland: Friedrich Julius Stahl Julius Hermann v. Kirchmann Wilhelm Dilthey als Grotius-Interpreten.Günter Hoffmann-Loerzer - 1975 - Zeitschrift für Religions- Und Geistesgeschichte 27 (4):305-329.
  15. Essays on the Law of Nature.John Locke - 1954 - Oxford, Clarendon Press.