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  1. The Need for a Revolution in the Philosophy of Science.Nicholas Maxwell - 2002 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 33 (2):381-408.
    There is a need to bring about a revolution in the philosophy of science, interpreted to be both the academic discipline, and the official view of the aims and methods of science upheld by the scientific community. At present both are dominated by the view that in science theories are chosen on the basis of empirical considerations alone, nothing being permanently accepted as a part of scientific knowledge independently of evidence. Biasing choice of theory in the direction of simplicity, unity (...)
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  2. The Large-Scale Structure of Scientific Method.Peter Kosso - 2009 - Science & Education 18 (1):33-42.
    The standard textbook description of the nature of science describes the proposal, testing, and acceptance of a theoretical idea almost entirely in isolation from other theories. The resulting model of science is a kind of piecemeal empiricism that misses the important network structure of scientific knowledge. Only the large-scale description of scientific method can reveal the global interconnectedness of scientific knowledge that is an essential part of what makes science scientific. © 2008 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
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  3. Pseudohistory and Pseudoscience: Corrections to Allchin’s Historical, Conceptual and Educational Claims.David R. Hershey - 2006 - Science & Education 15 (1):121-125.
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  4. A Reply to Allchin's "Pseudohistory and Pseudoscience".Anton E. Lawson - 2004 - Science and Education: Academic Journal of Ushynsky University 13 (6):599-605.
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  5. Towards a New Model of Science.Stefan Ziemski - 1976 - Zeitschrift Für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 7 (2):340-347.
    Summary One — Sided understanding of Aristotle led to the view that the principal aim of science is general knowledge. In modern times this view must be extended: also particular knowledge of concrete situations and objects has considerable validity for science. This kind of knowledge the author calls diagnostic. In all empirical sciences diagnostic studies form their necessary part. There are two poles in sciences concerning reality — the more and more developed general knowledge and the specialized knowledge about concrete (...)
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  6. The Objectives of Science.David Miller - 2007 - Philosophia Scientiae 11 (1):21-43.
    Contesting the common opinion that, unlike the problem of induction, the problem of demarcation is of little significance, the paper maintains that Popper’s criterion of falsifiability gives an irresistible answer to the question of what can be learnt from an empirical investigation. Everything follows from the rejection of inductive logic, together with the recognition that, before it can be empirically investigated, a hypothesis has to be formulated and accepted. Scientific hypotheses emerge neither a posteriori, as inductivists hold, nor from some (...)
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  7. Defending Science From All of its Enemies and Some of its Friends.Rom Harré - 2000 - Dialectica 54 (4):265-281.
    Recent debates about the values and virtues of the sciences have been marked by philosophical errors and misunderstandings among both the supporters and the critics of the value of science. Some authors, such as Wilson defending the ultimate value of science and Appleyard decrying the influence of scientific modes of thinking, both assume the positivistic stance to understanding science. Others, such as Dawkins, Maddox and Wolpert, come through as scientific realists, celebrating the power of science to reach beyond what can (...)
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  8. Inquiry Into Science: Its Domain and Limits.William F. Barr - 1972 - Philosophy of Science 39 (4):555-556.
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  9. Understanding Science Through its History: A Response to Newman.Alan Chalmers - 2011 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 42 (1):150-153.
    The paper is a response to William Newman’s rebuttal of a critique of his account of the origins of modern chemistry by Alan Chalmers. A way in which the nature of science can be illuminated by history of science is identified and an account of how this can be achieved in the context of a study of the work of Boyle defended in the face of Newman’s criticism. Texts from the writings of Boyle that are cited by Newman as posing (...)
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  10. Societies of Minds: Science as Distributed Computing.Paul Thagard - 1991 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 24 (1):49-67.
    Science is studied in very different ways by historians, philosophers, psychologists, and sociologists. Not only do researchers from different fields apply markedly different methods, they also tend to focus on apparently disparate aspects of science. At the farthest extremes, we find on one side some philosophers attempting logical analyses of scientific knowledge, and on the other some sociologists maintaining that all knowledge is socially constructed. This paper is an attempt to view history, philosophy, psychology, and sociology of science from a (...)
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  11. Imputing Intentionality: Popper, Demarcation and Darwin, Freud and Marx.Steven Yearley - 1984 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 16 (4):337.
  12. Theory in Psychology: A Reply to Tryon's "Measurement Units and Theory Construction".Altan Löker - 1999 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 20 (3):277-294.
    Tryon advises psychologists to construct theories as physicists do, and claims that a theory of physics is a system of algebraic relations which constitute the definitions of new concepts and their units of measurement in terms of existing ones, at least two basic units being initially adopted. He says that these algebraic relations create a knowledge hierarchy, which he considers a theory. In reality, only some of the mathematical relations of physics are definitions, which introduce new tools, while the rest (...)
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  13. La nature de la vérité scientifique. [REVIEW]Agustín Arrieta - 1987 - Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 2 (2-3):609-612.
  14. Philosophy of Pseudoscience. Reconsidering the Demarcation Problem. [REVIEW]Michał Tatarczak - 2015 - Roczniki Filozoficzne 63 (4):231-239.
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  15. Is African Science True Science? Reflections on the Methods of African Science.Oseni Taiwo Afisi - 2016 - Filosofia Theoretica: Journal of African Philosophy, Culture and Religions 5 (1):59-75.
    The general character of science and the methodology it employs are in specific terms referred to as observation and experimentation. These two methodologies reflect how science differs from other systematic modes of inquiries. This description characterises, strictly, ‘Western science’ and it is contrasted with the indigenous mode of enquiry that has come under the name, ‘African science’. In contemporary scholarship, ‘African science’ is being condemned to the level of the mysticoreligious or supernaturalist worldview. ‘African science’ is said to be purely (...)
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  16. The Nature of Scientific Knowledge: An Explanatory Approach.Kevin McCain - 2016 - Springer.
    This book offers a comprehensive and accessible introduction to the epistemology of science. It not only introduces readers to the general epistemological discussion of the nature of knowledge, but also provides key insights into the particular nuances of scientific knowledge. No prior knowledge of philosophy or science is assumed by The Nature of Scientific Knowledge. Nevertheless, the reader is taken on a journey through several core concepts of epistemology and philosophy of science that not only explores the characteristics of the (...)
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  17. The Nature and Function of Scientific Theories. Essays in Contemporary Science and Philosophy. Robert G. Colodny.J. E. Bolzan - 1972 - Isis 63 (2):256-257.
  18. Evandro Agazzi: Scientific Objectivity and Its Contexts. [REVIEW]Marco Buzzoni - 2016 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 47 (1):257-259.
  19. What is (a) Science?Sarah Tietz - unknown
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  20. Science: A ‘Dappled World’ or a ‘Seamless Web’?Philip W. Anderson - 2001 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 32 (3):487-494.
  21. Knowledge and Reference in Empirical Science.Jody Azzouni - 2000 - Routledge.
    _Knowledge and Reference in Empirical Science_ is a fascinating study of the bounds between science and language: in what sense, and of what, does science provide knowledge? Is science an instrument only distantly related to what's real? Can the language of science be used to adequately describe the truth? In this book, Jody Azziouni investigates the technology of science - the actual forging and exploiting of causal links, between ourselves and what we endeavor to know and understand.
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  22. Knowledge and Reference in Empirical Science.Jody Azzouni - 2000 - Routledge.
    _Knowledge and Reference in Empirical Science_ is a fascinating study of the bounds between science and language: in what sense, and of what, does science provide knowledge? Is science an instrument only distantly related to what's real? Can the language of science be used to adequately describe the truth? In this book, Jodi Azziouni investigates the technology of science - the actual forging and exploiting of causal links, between ourselves and what we endeavor to know and understand.
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  23. María de Paz and Robert DiSalle, Eds. Poincaré, Philosopher of Science. Dordrecht: Springer, 2014. Pp. Xiv+191. $179.00. [REVIEW]Marij van Strien - 2015 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 5 (1):183-187.
  24. Ofer Gal and Raz Chen-Morris - Baroque Science. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2013. Pp. 352, Index. $45.00. [REVIEW]Christoph Lüthy - 2014 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 4 (2):379-382.
  25. Modern Science and the Nature of Life [by William S. Beck]. [REVIEW]William B. Bean - 1958 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 1 (4):457-458.
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  26. Falsifiability.Darrell Patrick Rowbottom - unknown
    This entry gives an account of falsifiability both as championed in particular by Karl Popper and also more generally and examines its wider implications for scientific methodology.
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  27. Systematicity: The Nature of Science.Paul Hoyningen-Huene - 2016 - Oxford University Press USA.
    In Systematicity, Paul Hoyningen-Huene answers the question "What is science?" by proposing that scientific knowledge is primarily distinguished from other forms of knowledge, especially everyday knowledge, by being more systematic. "Science" is here understood in the broadest possible sense, encompassing not only the natural sciences but also mathematics, the social sciences, and the humanities. The author develops his thesis in nine dimensions in which it is claimed that science is more systematic than other forms of knowledge: regarding descriptions, explanations, predictions, (...)
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  28. The Comprehensibility of the Universe: A New Conception of Science.Nicholas Maxwell - 1998 - Oxford University Press UK.
    The Comprehensibility of the Universe puts forward a radically new conception of science. According to the orthodox conception, scientific theories are accepted and rejected impartially with respect to evidence, no permanent assumption being made about the world independently of the evidence. Nicholas Maxwell argues that this orthodox view is untenable. He urges that in its place a new orthodoxy is needed, which sees science as making a hierarchy of metaphysical assumptions about the comprehensibility and knowability of the universe, these assumptions (...)
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  29. Science in the Looking Glass: What Do Scientists Really Know?E. Brian Davies - 2003 - Oxford University Press UK.
    How do scientific conjectures become laws? Why does proof mean different things in different sciences? Do numbers exist, or were they invented? Why do some laws turn out to be wrong? In this wide-ranging book, Brian Davies discusses the basis for scientists' claims to knowledge about the world. He looks at science historically, emphasizing not only the achievements of scientists from Galileo onwards, but also their mistakes. He rejects the claim that all scientific knowledge is provisional, by citing examples from (...)
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  30. Good Science, Bad Science, Pseudoscience, and Just Plain Bunk: How to Tell the Difference.Peter A. Daempfle - 2012 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Good Science, Bad Science, Pseudoscience, and Just Plain Bunk teaches readers to think like scientists—to critically evaluate the truth of scientific claims. Filled with provocative real-life examples, from the effects of Bisphenol-A to examining some of the alleged causes of cancer, the book helps readers build their tools of scientific literacy.
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  31. The Fuzziness of Pseudoscience: Massimo Pigliucci and Maarten Boudry : Philosophy of Pseudoscience: Reconsidering the Demarcation Problem. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2013, Vii+469, $105 HB, $35 PB.Robert Nola - 2015 - Metascience 24 (2):279-284.
    This is a collection of 23 papers plus an Introduction in a book which revives an old issue that some have declared to be long dead, viz., whether there is any way of demarcating science from other endeavors, but most importantly pseudoscience. This is a timely book that is well worth consulting since it breathes life back into an important problem. There is something in it for all, as the six parts into which it is divided indicate: “What’s the problem (...)
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  32. History and Philosophy of Science in Japanese Education: A Historical Overview.Yuko Murakami & Manabu Sumida - 2014 - In Michael R. Matthews (ed.), International Handbook of Research in History, Philosophy and Science Teaching. Springer. pp. 2217-2245.
    This article describes the historical development of HPS/NOS mainly in higher education. Because the establishment of universities in Japan in late-nineteenth century was a reaction against Western imperialism, higher education aimed to cultivate scientists and engineers with an emphasis on practical applications. This direction in higher science and engineering education continues into the present. It has conditioned elementary and secondary education via university entrance examinations, where no questions on NOS appear. Hence, HPS research and education has developed in Japanese higher (...)
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  33. Nature of Science in the Science Curriculum and in Teacher Education Programs in the United States.William F. McComas - 2014 - In Michael R. Matthews (ed.), International Handbook of Research in History, Philosophy and Science Teaching. Springer. pp. 1993-2023.
    This chapter considers the complex educational landscape in the United States and presents the results of an examination of the rationale for and history of the inclusion of nature of science (NOS) in the science curriculum, standards, and teacher education programs in the United States. The analysis begins with a definition of NOS and recommendations for its inclusion in school science and moves into a discussion of the context for the control of education in US K-12 schools (K-12 refers to (...)
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  34. The Evolution of Scientific Knowledge.Hans Siggaard Jensen, Lykke Margot Richter & Vendelø Morten Thanning - 2003 - Edward Elgar Publishing.
    The Evolution of Scientific Knowledge aims to reach a unique understanding of science with the help of economic and sociological theories. They use institutional and evolutionary theories and the sociological theories draw from the type of work on social studies of science that have, in recent decades, transformed our picture of science and technology. The Evolution of Scientific Knowledge aims to reach a unique understanding of science with the help of economic and sociological theories. They use institutional and evolutionary theories (...)
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  35. Students' Understanding of the Nature of Science Philosophical and Sociological Foundations to the Study.Robin Millar, Children'S. Learning in Science Research Group & Science Education Group - 1993
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  36. The Manufacture of Knowledge an Essay on the Constructivist and Contextual Nature of Science.Karin D. Knorr - 1981
    Let us summarise in brief the major theses of the book by pointing once more to the distinctive conceptions advanced in the preceding chapters. First, we have said that the “cognitive” operations of scientific enquiry display themselves to an empirical epistemology as constructive rather than descriptive, and we have explicated construc­tivity in terms of the decision-laden character of knowledge production. Note that we have linked the selectivity embodied in the products of science to a social process of negotiation situated in (...)
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  37. The New Scientific Spirit.Gaston Bachelard - 1984
  38. New Directions for Nature of Science Research.Gürol Irzik & Robert Nola - 2014 - In Michael R. Matthews (ed.), International Handbook of Research in History, Philosophy and Science Teaching. Springer. pp. 999-1021.
    The idea of family resemblance, when applied to science, can provide a powerful account of the nature of science (NOS). In this chapter we develop such an account by taking into consideration the consensus on NOS that emerged in the science education literature in the last decade or so. According to the family resemblance approach, the nature of science can be systematically and comprehensively characterised in terms of a number of science categories which exhibit strong similarities and overlaps amongst diverse (...)
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  39. The Development, Use, and Interpretation of Nature of Science Assessments.Norman G. Lederman - 2014 - In Michael R. Matthews (ed.), International Handbook of Research in History, Philosophy and Science Teaching. Springer. pp. 971-997.
    Efforts to assess students' and teachers' understandings of nature of science have extended for over 50 years. During this time, numerous instruments have been developed that span the full range of assessments from the traditional to open-ended assessments with interviews. As one might expect, the development, use, and interpretation of these assessments have paralleled the scholarship on students’ and teachers’ understandings of nature of science. Consequently, such assessments have evidenced the same challenges and obstacles seen in the general research literature. (...)
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  40. Nature of Science in the Science Curriculum: Origin, Development, Implications and Shifting Emphases.Derek Hodson - 2014 - In Michael R. Matthews (ed.), International Handbook of Research in History, Philosophy and Science Teaching. Springer. pp. 911-970.
    This chapter briefly traces the history of nature of science (NOS) orientations in science education, notes some differences in the way NOS is defined and in arguments used to justify its inclusion in the school science curriculum and acknowledges the centrality of NOS to recent curriculum and research initiatives based on scientific argumentation, modelling and consideration of socioscientific issues (SSI). Some critical scrutiny is directed towards the so-called consensus view of NOS and whether it adequately and appropriately represents the diversity (...)
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  41. An Architectonic for Science.Wolfgang Balzer, C. Ulises Moulines & Joseph D. Sneed - 1990 - Philosophy of Science 57 (2):349-350.
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  42. Representation and Uncertainty: An Essay on Pierre Duhem's Philosophy of Science.Charles Evan Cardwell - 1972 - Dissertation, The University of Rochester
  43. Science in Flux, Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science.Joseph Agassi - 1975 - Taylor & Francis.
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  44. Non-Falsifiability: An Inductivist Perspective.D. J. Balestra - 1979 - International Logic Review 19:118.
  45. A Social Science Founded on a Unified Natural Science.Benedict M. Ashley - 1961 - The Thomist 24 (2):605.
  46. Science and the Constitutive a Priori: Ian Hacking's Philosophy of Scientific Practice in the History of Philosophy of Science.Todd Newman Davis - 2001 - Dissertation, Duke University
    In this dissertation, I consider the relations between the broadly Kantian idea of the constitutive a priori, understood as the conditions of the possibility for scientific judgement, and the appeal to actual scientific practice in recent history and philosophy of science. Philosophies of scientific practice, particularly Ian Hacking's, are critical of philosophy of science as the analysis of scientific theories. Using a reading of Hacking's philosophical interpretation of scientific practice to motivate the construction of a conceptual genealogy of the epistemological (...)
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  47. Social Science and Natural Science.L. Mises - 1941 - Journal of Social Philosophy and Jurisprudence 7:240.
  48. HARRÉ, R. - "The Principles of Scientific Thinking". [REVIEW]R. Jones - 1972 - Mind 81:300.
  49. The Nature of Scientific Theoryhood.J. Watkins - 1988 - Philosophia Naturalis 25 (3/4):241.
  50. The Nature of Science Problems and Perspectives.Edwin H. Hung - 1997
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1 — 50 / 369