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  1. The Deontological Foundation of Neo-Confucian Virtue Ethics.George J. Aulisio - 2020 - International Philosophical Quarterly 60 (3):339-353.
    I show that Neo-Confucianism is practiced in two ways: (1) deontologically and (2) as a virtue ethical theory. When fully appreciated, Neo-Confucianism is a virtue ethical theory, but to set out on the path of the sage and behave like a junzi, Neo-Confucianism must first be practiced deontologically. I show this by examining the importance of Neo-Confucian metaphysics to ethical practice and by drawing out the major practical differences between “lesser learning” and “higher learning.” In my view, Neo-Confucianism can be (...)
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  2. Oneness, Aspects, and the Neo-Confucians.Donald L. M. Baxter - 2018 - In Philip J. Ivanhoe, Owen Flanagan, Victoria S. Harrison, Hagop Sarkissian & Eric Schwitzgebel (eds.), The Oneness Hypothesis: Beyond the Boundary of Self. New York, USA: Columbia University Press.
    Confucius gave counsel that is notoriously hard to follow: "What you do not wish for yourself, do not impose on others" (Huang 1997: 15.24). People tend to be concerned with themselves and to be indifferent to most others. We are distinct from others so our self-concern does not include them, or so it seems. Were we to realize this distinctness is merely apparent--that our true self includes others--Confucius's counsel would be easier to follow. Concern for our true self would extend (...)
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  3. Review of David McPherson's Spirituality and the Good Life: Philosophical Approaches, Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews, 2018.10.26. [REVIEW]Matthew C. Halteman - 2018 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 201810.
  4. Neo-Confucianism, Experimental Philosophy and the Trouble with Intuitive Methods.Hagop Sarkissian - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (5):812-828.
    ABSTRACTThe proper role of intuitions in philosophy has been debated throughout its history, and especially since the turn of the twenty-first century. The context of this recent debate within analytic philosophy has been the heightened interest in intuitions as data points that need to be accommodated or explained away by philosophical theories. This, in turn, has given rise to a sceptical movement called experimental philosophy, whose advocates seek to understand the nature and reliability of such intuitions. Yet such scepticism of (...)
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  5. Tu Weiming (1940- ).Andrew T. W. Hung - 2016 - The Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Tu Weiming (pinyin: Du Weiming) is one of the most famous Chinese Confucian thinkers of the 20th and 21st centuries. As a prominent member of the third generation of “New Confucians,” Tu stressed the significance of religiosity within Confucianism. Inspired by his teacher Mou Zongsan as well as his decades of study and teaching at Princeton University, the University of California, and Harvard University, Tu aimed to renovate and enhance Confucianism through an encounter with Western (in particular American) social theory (...)
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  6. Neo-Confucians and Zhu Xi on Family and Woman: Challenges and Potentials,”.Ann A. Pang-White - 2016 - In The Bloomsbury Research Handbook of Chinese Philosophy and Gender. pp. 69-88.
    In Chinese philosophy’s encounter with modernity and feminist discourse, Neo-Confucianism often suffered the most brutal attacks and criticisms. In “Neo-Confucians and Zhu Xi on Family and Woman: Challenges and Potentials,” Ann A. Pang-White investigates Song Neo-Confucians’ views (in particular, that of Zhu Xi) on women by examining the Classifi ed Conversations of Zhu Xi (Zhuzi Yulei), the Reflections on Things at Hand (Jinsi Lu), Further Reflections on Things at Hand (Xu Jinsi Lu), and other texts. Pang-White also takes a close (...)
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  7. Simone de Beauvoir and Confucian Role Ethics: Role‐Relational Ambiguity and Confucian Mystification.Ian M. Sullivan - 2016 - Hypatia 31 (3):620-635.
    This article argues that there has been a general misunderstanding of the nature of role relations in Confucian role ethics. Recasting constitutive role relations in light of Beauvoir's ethics of ambiguity will aid in developing Confucian role ethics as a contemporary vision of human flourishing that can internally accommodate the need for a feminist transformation.
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  8. A Psychological Perspective Comparing the Views of Dai Zhen (戴 震) and Zhu Xi (朱 熹) On Human Nature.Ali Far - 2014 - GSTF Journal of Psychology 1 (2).
    The objective of this paper is to provide a psychological perspective on Zhu Xi (ZX) and Dai Zhen (DZ) views about human nature, by comparing the potential implications of their views on an agent's moral cultivation. To help frame this objective, I will ask and answer the following question: if one commits to ZX who holds the view that human nature is innately good, although obscured, versus if one holds DZ's view that while human nature has the potential for good (...)
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  9. Skepticism and the Neo-Confucian Canon: Itō Jinsai’s Philosophical Critique of the Great Learning.John A. Tucker - 2013 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (1):11-39.
    This study examines Itō Jinsai’s 伊藤仁斎 criticisms of the Great Learning. Three primary sources are considered: Jinsai’s Shigi sakumon私擬策問 ; the Daigaku teihon大學定本 ; and his essay, “Daigaku wa Kōshi no isho ni arazaru no ben” 大學非孔氏之遺書辨, appended to his Gomō jigi語孟字義. The study suggests that Jinsai’s critical inclinations grew from his acceptance of Zhu Xi’s views about the value of doubt for progress in learning. The study also suggests that Jinsai’s thinking on the Great Learning had political implications derived (...)
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  10. Against Fairness.Stephen T. Asma - 2012 - Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
    From the school yard to the workplace, there’s no charge more damning than “you’re being unfair!” Born out of democracy and raised in open markets, fairness has become our de facto modern creed. The very symbol of American ethics—Lady Justice—wears a blindfold as she weighs the law on her impartial scale. In our zealous pursuit of fairness, we have banished our urges to like one person more than another, one thing over another, hiding them away as dirty secrets of our (...)
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  11. Confucianism and Ubuntu: Reflections on a Dialogue Between Chinese and African Traditions (Repr.).Daniel A. Bell & Thaddeus Metz - 2012 - In Chung-Ying Cheng (ed.), Confucian Philosophy: Innovations and Transformations. Wiley. pp. ch. 7.
    Reprint of an article appearing in the Journal of Chinese Philosophy (2011).
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  12. Confucianism and Ubuntu: Reflections on a Dialogue Between Chinese and African Traditions.Daniel A. Bell & Thaddeus Metz - 2011 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (s1):78-95.
    In this article we focus on three key precepts shared by Confucianism and the African ethic of Ubuntu: the central value of community, the desirability of ethical partiality, and the idea that we tend to become morally better as we grow older. For each of these broad similarities, there are key differences underlying them, and we discuss those as well as speculate about the reasons for them. Our aim is not to take sides, but we do suggest ways that Ubuntu (...)
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  13. “Spewing Jade and Spitting Pearls”:1 Li Zhi's Ethics of Genuineness.Pauline C. Lee - 2011 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (s1):114-132.
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  14. Transcendent or Immanent? Significance and History of Li in Confucianism.John W. M. Krummel - 2010 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (3):417-437.
    This paper investigates the meaning of the neo-Confucian concept of 'li'. From early on, it has the sense of a pattern designating how things are and ought to be. But it takes on the appearance of something transcendent to the world only at a certain point in history, when it becomes juxtaposed to 'qi'. Zhu Xi has been criticized for this 'li-qi' dichotomization and the transcendentalization of 'li'. The paper re-examines this putative dualism and transcendentalism, looking into both Zhu's discussions (...)
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  15. Confucianism and Virtue Ethics: Still a Fledgling in Chinese and Comparative Philosophy.Justin Tiwald - 2010 - Comparative Philosophy 1 (2):55-63.
    The past couple of decades have witnessed a remarkable burst of philosophical energy and talent devoted to virtue ethical approaches to Confucianism, including several books, articles, and even high-profile workshops and conferences that make connections between Confucianism and either virtue ethics as such or moral philosophers widely regarded as virtue ethicists. Those who do not work in the combination of Chinese philosophy and ethics may wonder what all of the fuss is about. Others may be more familiar with the issues (...)
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  16. Reconstructing (Neo)Confucianism in a "Glocal" Postmodern Culture Context.Ning Wang - 2010 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (1):48-61.
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  17. Sagehood: The Contemporary Significance of Neo-Confucian Philosophy.Stephen C. Angle - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    The book's significance is two-fold: it argues for a new stage in the development of contemporary Confucian philosophy, and it demonstrates the value to Western ...
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  18. The Theory of the Dao and Taiji: A Chinese Model of the Mind.Ming Dong Gu - 2009 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 36 (1):157-175.
  19. Liu, Shuxian 劉述先, on the Three Great Epochs of Confucian Philosophy 論儒家哲學的三個大時代.Hon Tze-ki - 2009 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 8 (4):471-473.
  20. Fitting: A Case of Cheng(誠) Intentionality.Daihyun Chung - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 39:35-41.
    Notions of fitting seem to be attractive in explaining language understanding. This paper tries to interpret "fitting" in terms of holistic (cheng, 誠) intentionality rather than the dualistic one. I propose to interpret “cheng” as a notion of integration: The cheng of an entity is the power to realize the embedded objective of it in the context where it interacts with all others; "Mind" refers to the ability of not a single kind of entity but to that of all entities (...)
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  21. Neo-Confucian Philosophy.John H. Berthrong - 2005 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  22. Koliko Je “Kineski” Bio Kant?Stephen R. Palmquist & Nevad Kahteran - 2005 - Dialogue 1:190-207.
    Bosnian translation of "How 'Chinese' Was Kant?" (abridged version).
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  23. From Aristotle’s De Anima to Xia Dachang’s Xingshuo.Vincent Shen - 2005 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 32 (4):575–596.
  24. Review of Manufacturing Confucianism: Chinese Traditions and Universal Civilization by Lionel M. Jensen. [REVIEW]Stephen C. Angle - 2001 - Philosophy East and West 51 (1):120-122.
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  25. Neo-Confucian Cosmology, Virtue Ethics, and Environmental Philosophy.Donald N. Blakeley - 2001 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 8 (2):37-49.
    This paper explores the extent to which the Confucian concept of ren (humaneness) has application in ways that are comparable tocontemporary versions of environmental virtue ethics. I argue that the accounts of self-cultivation that are developed in major texts of the Confucian tradition have important direct implications for environmental thinking that even the Neo-Confucians do not seriously entertain.
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  26. Postmodernism in the Post-Confucian Context: Epistemological and Political Considerations. [REVIEW]Chaibong Hahm - 2001 - Human Studies 24 (1-2):29-44.
    This paper reflects on the implications of postmodern political discourse for East-Asian politics. It argues that the postmodernist deconstruction of modern epistemology and politics provides an opportunity for the reappraisal and rehabilitation of Confucianism in East Asia. First, the paper begins with an account of Cartesian epistemology which undergirds the liberal conceptions of selfhood and politics. Second, it provides a brief history of the Neo-Confucian synthesis and the resulting epistemology based on an intersubjective and ethical understanding of being human. Third, (...)
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  27. Confucian Moral Self Cultivation, 2nd Ed.Philip J. Ivanhoe - 2000 - Hackett.
    A concise and accessible introduction to the moral philosophy of Kongzi (Confucius), Mengzi (Mencius), Xunzi, Zhu Xi, Wang Yangming, Yan Yuan and Dai Zhen.
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  28. Mark Setton, Chông Yagyong: Korea’s Challenge to Orthodox Neo-Confucianism. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1997. Xv, 232 Pages. [REVIEW]Martina Deuchler - 1999 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 26 (3):407-409.
  29. The Philosophy of Wu Chʻeng: A Neo-Confucian of the Yüan Dynasty = [Wu Chʻeng].David Gedalecia - 1999 - Research Institute for Inner Asian Studies, Indiana University.
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  30. Response to Matthew Levy's Review of "Li Yong (1627-1705) and Epistemological Dimensions of Confucian Philosophy". [REVIEW]Anne D. Birdwhistell - 1998 - Philosophy East and West 48 (1):164 - 165.
  31. Extending the Neo-Confucian Tradition Questions and Reconceptualization for the Twenty-First Century.Michael C. Kalton - 1998 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 25 (1):75-100.
  32. Authority and Truth: The Tension Between Classical Learning and Historical Inquiry in Cui Shu’s Scholarship.Dong-Fang Shao - 1998 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 25 (3):321-344.
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  33. Utilitarianism in Chinese Thought.Jinfen Yan - 1998 - World Heritage Press.
    Amid a far-reaching convergence of Western and Chinese cultures, utilitarianism has become a 'hot' new philosophical and ethical topic in China. I call the various different ideas associated with this new academic theme Chinese neo-utilitarianism. Chinese Neo-utilitarianism is an attempt to combine Marxism, the Western ethical tradition and the Chinese tradition to create a new approach different from that of complete Westernization, or the pure Chinese tradition or Marxism so as to bring the greatest happiness for the greatest number of (...)
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  34. On a Comprehensive Theory of Xing (Naturality) in Song-Ming Neo-Confucian Philosophy: A Critical and Integrative Development.Chung-ying Cheng - 1997 - Philosophy East and West 47 (1):33-46.
    The question of xing has received much attention in the revival of Neo-Confucian philosophy (called Contemporary Neo-Confucianism) in present-day Taiwan, Hong Kong, and China and among scholars of Chinese philosophy in the United States. It also has much to do with a critical consciousness of both the difference and the affinity between the Chinese philosophy of man and morality and the contemporary Western philosophy of human existence and moral virtues. The study of this has great meaning for the development of (...)
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  35. On the Metaphysical Foundations of Neo- and New Confucianism: Reflections on Lauren Pfister’s Essay on Religious Confucianism.Philip J. Ivanhoe - 1995 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 22 (1):81-89.
  36. The Uses of Neo-Confucianism: A Response to Professor Tillman.Wm Theodore de Bary - 1993 - Philosophy East and West 43 (3):541-555.
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  37. Wu Chueng: A Yuan Dynasty Neo-Confucian Scholar.David Gedalecia - 1993 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 20 (3):293-311.
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  38. Cheng and Tucker: A Comparative Appraisal Two Important Recent Confucian and Neo-Confucian Studies.Wallace Gray - 1993 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 20 (3):349-363.
  39. An Outline of Confucianism: Traditional and Neoconfucianism, and Criticism.Don Y. Lee - 1988 - Eastern Press.
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  40. Yüan Thought: Chinese Thought and Religion Under the Mongols.Hok-lam Chan & William Theodore De Bary (eds.) - 1982 - Columbia University Press.
    Ten conference papers which focus on the literature's attempt to regain control and rejuvenate the indigenous traditions of Confucianism, Taoism, and Buddhism.
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  41. Chu Hsi and Yüan Neo-Confucianism.Wing-tsit Chan - 1982 - In Hok-lam Chan & William Theodore De Bary (eds.), Yüan Thought: Chinese Thought and Religion Under the Mongols. Columbia University Press.
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  42. Confucianism, Local Reform, and Centralization in Late Yüan Chekiang, 1342-1359.John W. Dardess - 1982 - In Hok-lam Chan & William Theodore De Bary (eds.), Yüan Thought: Chinese Thought and Religion Under the Mongols. Columbia University Press.
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  43. A Comparison of Li and Substantial Form.Russell Hatton - 1982 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 9 (1):49-76.
  44. Descriptive and Normative Principle (Li) in Confucian Moral Metaphysics: Is/Ought From the Chinese Perspective.Joseph A. Adler - 1981 - Zygon 16 (3):285-293.
  45. The Unfolding of Neo-Confucianism'.John D. Lanclois - 1980 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 7 (2):187-194.
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  46. Paths of Convergence: Interactions of Inner Alchemy Taoism and Neo‐Confucianism.Judith A. Berlinc - 1979 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 6 (2):123-147.
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  47. Evolution and Synthesis in Neo-Confucianism.David Gedalecia - 1979 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 6 (1):91-102.
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  48. The Religious Dimension of Neo-Confucianism.Ha Tai Kim - 1977 - Philosophy East and West 27 (3):337-348.
  49. The Spirit and Development of Neo-Confucianism.Tang Chun-I. - 1971 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 14 (1-4):56 – 83.
    The ideal of human life as a life of sagehood is the core of Confucian thought. In neo?Confucianism the stress is on the self?perfectibility of man, and the central concern of neo?Confucianist thinkers has accordingly been with the question of how man can cultivate his own potentiality to be a sage. The different answers they give are in the form of teachings about the ?way?, these teachings incorporating different philosophical views of mind, human nature, and the universe. The author outlines (...)
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  50. Ou-Yang Hsiu: An Eleventh-Century Neo-Confucianist.Constantine Tung - 1968 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 6 (2):101-102.
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