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  1. The Metaphysics of Dao in W Ang Bi’s Interpretation of Laozi.Hao Hong - 2019 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 18 (2):219-240.
    WANG Bi 王弼 develops a metaphysic of Dao 道 in his Commentary on Laozi and “The Structure of Laozi’s Subtle Pointers.” I summarize this metaphysic as the following thesis: Dao is featureless and is the ultimate reason why the myriad things exist and are the ways they are. I develop a systematic account of this thesis: I provide an interpretation of the featurelessness of Dao and show how Dao’s featurelessness relates to its fundamental explanatory role as the ontological ground for (...)
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  2. Littlejohn, Ronnie, and Jeffrey Dippmann, Ed., Riding the Wind With Liezi. New Perspectives on the Daoist Classic.Hans-Georg Moeller - 2012 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (3):405-408.
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  3. The Classic of Changes: A New Translation of the I Ching as Interpreted by Wang Bi Translated by Richard John Lynn.J. Lee Schroeder - 1996 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 23 (3):369-380.
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  4. Kuo Hsiang and the Chuang Tzu.Livia Knaul - 1985 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 12 (4):429-447.
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  5. His K'ang and Argumentation in the Wei, and a Refutation of the Essay 'Residence is Unrelated to Good and Bad Fortune: Nourish Life'.Robert Henricks - 1981 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 8 (2):169-223.
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  6. 'The Art of Rulership' Chapter of the Huai Nan Tzu: A Practicable Taoism.Roger T. Ames - 1981 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 8 (2):225-244.
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  7. Wang Pi on the Mind.Chung-Yue Chang - 1982 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 9 (1):77-106.
  8. The Huai-Nan Tzu Alteration.Wayne Alt - 1993 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 20 (1):73-84.
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  9. Life and Death: The Dionysian Spirit of Juan Chi and Neo-Taoists.Ellen Y. Zhang - 1999 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 26 (3):295-321.
  10. Continuity-Guo Xiang, Chan, Cheng-Zhu Lixue, New Realism, Marxism-Feng Youlan's Discernment of the Way.Diane B. Obenchacm - 1994 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 21 (3-4):481-519.
  11. The Concept of Human Nature in the Huai-Nan Tzu.H. D. Roth - 1985 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 12 (1):1-22.
  12. Meontology in Early Xuanxue Thought.David Chai - 2010 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (1):90-101.
  13. Musical Naturalism in the Thought of Ji Kang.David Chai - 2009 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 8 (2):151-171.
    Wei-Jin period is characterized by neo-Daoism ( xuanxue 玄學), and J I Kang lived in the midst of this philosophical exploration. Adopting the naturalism of the Zhuangzi , J i Kang expressed his socio-political concerns through the medium of music, which was previously regarded as having moral bearing and rectitude. Denying such rectitude became central for J i Kang, who claimed that music was incapable of possessing human emotion, releasing it from the chains of Confucian ritualism. His investigation into the (...)
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  14. Understanding Double Mystery: Daoism in Early Tang as Mirrored in the Fdlh (T 2104) and Chongxuanxue.Friederike Assandri - 2005 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 32 (3):427–440.
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  15. Guo Xiang.J. Scot Brackenridge - 2007 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  16. Neo-Daoism.Alan K. L. Chan - 2008 - In Bo Mou (ed.), Routledge History of Chinese Philosophy. Routledge.
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  17. Zhong Hui (Chung Hui, 225–264 CE).Alan Kam-Leung Chan - 2007 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  18. Ziporyn, Brook, the Penumbra Unbound: The Neo-Taoist Philosophy of Guo Xiang.Paul D’Ambrosio & Hans-Georg Moeller - 2007 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 6 (4):437-440.
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  19. Insidious Syncretism in the Political Philosophy of Huai‐Nan‐Tzu 1.Paul Rakita Goldin - 1999 - Asian Philosophy 9 (3):165 – 191.
    This is a study of the ninth chapter of the Huai-nan-tzu, a Chinese philosophical text compiled in the mid-second century BC. The chapter (entitled Chu-shu [The techniques of the ruler]) has been consistently interpreted as a proposal for a benign government that is rooted in the syncretic Taoist principles of the Huai-nan-tzu and is designed to serve the best interests of the people. I argue, on the contrary, that the text makes skilful (and deliberately deceptive) use of vocabulary from the (...)
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  20. The Categorical Interpretation of Guo Xiang’s “Independent Genesis”.Zhongqian Kang - 2008 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 3 (4):520-534.
    Seemingly, “independent genesis” refers to the independent existence and changes of each thing, but it is clear that there cannot be any truly “independent” things at all. Each thing in the world has to stay in connection or relationship with other things outside itself if it wants to represent its own “independence” and “genesis” in terms of form; and inevitably such connection or relationship itself has to be embodied in the internal nature of each thing. In the metaphysical thought of (...)
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  21. Ge Hong.Keith Knapp - 2003 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  22. The Nameless and Formless Dao as Metaphor and Imagery: Modeling the Dao in Wang Bi's Laozi.Jude Chua Soo Meng - 2005 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 32 (3):477–492.
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  23. Wagner, Rudolf G., A Chinese Reading of the Daodejing: W Ang Bi’s Commentary on the Laozi, with Critical Text and Translation.Xing Wen - 2008 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (4):467-471.
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Wang Bi
  1. Wang Yangming.Youngmin Kim - 2005 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  2. Wang Bi.Ronnie Littlejohn - 2005 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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Neo-Daoism, Misc
  1. Ji Kang on Nourishing Life.David Chai - 2017 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 12 (1):38-53.
    Ji Kang’s “An Essay on Nourishing Life” has, for much of its history, been overshadowed by his more famous work “Sound is without Grief or Joy.” Be that as it may, “An Essay on Nourishing Life” is also an important text in that it delves into the interdependence of the heart-mind, spirit, and vital breath, and into how harmony between them is the key to ensuring physical longevity. In addition to investigating this aspect of his thought, this paper will also (...)
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