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  1. Neural Synchrony and the Causal Efficacy of Consciousness.David Yates - 2020 - Topoi 39 (5):1057-1072.
    The purpose of this paper is to address a well-known dilemma for physicalism. If mental properties are type identical to physical properties, then their causal efficacy is secure, but at the cost of ruling out mentality in creatures very different to ourselves. On the other hand, if mental properties are multiply realizable, then all kinds of creatures can instantiate them, but then they seem to be causally redundant. The causal exclusion problem depends on the widely held principle that realized properties (...)
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  2. Neurodynamics of Time Consciousness: An Extensionalist Explanation of Apparent Motion and the Specious Present Via Reentrant Oscillatory Multiplexing.Matthew Stuart Piper - 2019 - Consciousness and Cognition 73:102751.
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  3. The Experience Dependent Dynamics of Human Consciousness.Birgitta Dresp-Langley - 2018 - Open Journal of Philosophy 8 (2):116-143.
    By reviewing most of the neurobiology of consciousness, this article highlights some major reasons why a successful emulation of the dynamics of human consciousness by artificial intelligence is unlikely. The analysis provided leads to conclude that human consciousness is epigenetically determined and experience and context-dependent at the individual level. It is subject to changes in time that are essentially unpredictable. If cracking the code to human consciousness were possible, the result would most likely have to consist of a temporal pattern (...)
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  4. Mind the Physics: Physics of Mind.Andrew And Alexander Fingelkurts - 2018 - Physics of Life Reviews 25:75-77.
    The target paper of Schoeller, Perlovsky, and Arseniev is an essential and timely contribution to a current shift of focus in neuroscience aiming to merge neurophysiological, psychological and physical principles in order to build the foundation for the physics of mind. Extending on previous work of Perlovsky et al. and Badre, the authors of the target paper present interesting mathematical models of several basic principles of the physics of mind, such as perception and cognition, concepts and emotions, instincts and learning. (...)
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  5. “Paradox of Slow Frequencies” – Are Slow Frequencies in Upper Cortical Layers a Neural Predisposition of the Level/State of Consciousness (NPC)?Georg Northoff - 2017 - Consciousness and Cognition 54:20-35.
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  6. Topodynamics of Metastable Brains.Arturo Tozzi, James F. Peters, Andrew A. Fingelkurts, Alexander A. Fingelkurts & Pedro C. Marijuán - 2017 - Physics of Life Reviews 21:1-20.
    The brain displays both the anatomical features of a vast amount of interconnected topological mappings as well as the functional features of a nonlinear, metastable system at the edge of chaos, equipped with a phase space where mental random walks tend towards lower energetic basins. Nevertheless, with the exception of some advanced neuro-anatomic descriptions and present-day connectomic research, very few studies have been addressing the topological path of a brain embedded or embodied in its external and internal environment. Herein, by (...)
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  7. Neuroelectrical Approaches to Binding Problems.Mostyn W. Jones - 2016 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 2 (37).
    How do separate brain processes bind to form unified, conscious percepts? This is the perceptual binding problem, which straddles neuroscience and psychology. In fact, two problems exist here: (1) the easy problem of how neural processes are unified, and (2) the hard problem of how this yields unified perceptual consciousness. Binding theories face familiar troubles with (1) and they do not come to grips with (2). This paper argues that neuroelectrical (electromagnetic-field) approaches may help with both problems. Concerning the easy (...)
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  8. Attentional State: From Automatic Detection to Willful Focused Concentration.Andrew And Alexander Fingelkurts - 2015 - In G. Marchetti, G. Benedetti & A. Alharbi (eds.), Attantion and Meaning. The Attentional Basis of Meaning. Nova Science Publishers. pp. 133-150.
    Despite the fact that attention is a core property of all perceptual and cognitive operations, our understanding of its neurophysiological mechanisms is far from complete. There are many theoretical models that try to fill this gap in knowledge, though practically all of them concentrate only on either involuntary (bottom-up) or voluntarily (top-down) aspect of attention. At the same time, both aspects of attention are rather integrated in the living brain. In this chapter we attempt to conceptualise both aspects of attentional (...)
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  9. Occipital Long-Interval Paired Pulse TMS Leads to Slow Wave Components in NREM Sleep.Mihkel Stamm, Jaan Aru, Renate Rutiku & Talis Bachmann - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 35:78-87.
  10. Corrigendum to “Lost in Time…: The Search for Intentions and Readiness Potentials” [Consciousness and Cognition 33 300–315].Ceci Verbaarschot, Jason Farquhar & Pim Haselager - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 33:300-315.
    http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1053810015002378 -/- the original Fig. 4B published in this paper was incorrect.
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  11. The Involuntary Initiation of Timing Actions by Loud Sounds Depends on Attention to Sensory Modalities.Marinovic Welber, Cheung Fiona, Tresilian James & Riek Stephan - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  12. The Pre-Reflective Experience of “I” as a Continuously Existing Being: The Role of Temporal Functional Binding.Peter A. White - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 31:98-114.
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  13. The Victorians Were Still Faster Than Us. Commentary: Factors Influencing the Latency of Simple Reaction Time.Michael A. Woodley of Menie, Jan te Nijenhuis & Raegan Murphy - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  14. Factors Influencing the Latency of Simple Reaction Time.David L. Woods, John M. Wyma, E. William Yund, Timothy J. Herron & Bruce Reed - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  15. Present Moment, Past, and Future: Mental Kaleidoscope.Andrew A. Fingelkurts & Alexander A. Fingelkurts - 2014 - Frontiers Psychology 5:395.
    It is the every person's daily phenomenal experience that conscious states represent their contents as occurring now. Following Droege (2009) we could state that consciousness has a peculiar affinity for presence. Some researchers even argue that conscious awareness necessarily demands that mental content is somehow held “frozen” within a discrete progressive present moment. Thus, phenomenal content seems to be minimally conscious if it is integrated into a single and coherent model of reality during a “virtual window” of presence.
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  16. Constructing Time: Dennett and Grush on Temporal Representation.Bruno Mölder - 2014 - In Valtteri Arstila & Dan Lloyd (eds.), Subjective Time: Philosophy, Psychology and Neuroscience of Temporality. MIT Press. pp. 217-238.
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  17. The Timing Problem.Iens Iohansson - 2013 - In Fred Feldman Ben Bradley (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Death. pp. 255.
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  18. The Brain and its States.Richard Brown - 2012 - In Shimon Edelman, Tomer Fekete & Neta Zach (eds.), Being in Time: Dynamical Models of Phenomenal Experience. John Benjamins. pp. 211-238.
    In recent times we have seen an explosion in the amount of attention paid to the conscious brain from scientists and philosophers alike. One message that has emerged loud and clear from scientific work is that the brain is a dynamical system whose operations unfold in time. Any theory of consciousness that is going to be physically realistic must take account of the intrinsic nature of neurons and brain activity. At the same time a long discussion on consciousness among philosophers (...)
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  19. Being in Time: Dynamical Models of Phenomenal Experience.Shimon Edelman, Tomer Fekete & Neta Zach (eds.) - 2012 - John Benjamins.
    The chapters comprising this book represent a collective attempt on the part of their authors to redress this aberration.
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  20. Neural Activity in Relation to Temporal Distance: Differences in Past and Future Temporal Discounting.J. He, X. Huang, H. Yuan & Y. Chen - 2012 - Consciousness and Cognition 21 (4):1662-1672.
    This study investigated the differences between past and future temporal discounting in terms of neural activity in relation to temporal distance. Results show that brain regions are engaged differently in past and future temporal discounting. This is likely because past temporal discounting requires memory reconstruction, whereas future temporal discounting requires the processing of uncertainty about the future. In past temporal discounting, neural activity differed only when preferences were made between rewards received one hour prior and rewards received further in the (...)
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  21. Outlier Detection of Air Temperature Series Data Using Probabilistic Finite State Automata‐Based Algorithm.Jun Shen, Minhua Yang, Bin Zou, Neng Wan & Yufang Liao - 2012 - Complexity 17 (5):48-57.
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  22. Shifts of Criteria or Neural Timing? The Assumptions Underlying Timing Perception Studies.Kielan Yarrow, Nina Jahn, Szonya Durant & Derek H. Arnold - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1518-1531.
    In timing perception studies, the timing of one event is usually manipulated relative to another, and participants are asked to judge if the two events were synchronous, or to judge which of the two events occurred first. Responses are analyzed to determine a measure of central tendency, which is taken as an estimate of the timing at which the two events are perceptually synchronous. When these estimates do not coincide with physical synchrony, it is often assumed that the sensory signals (...)
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  23. Preparing to Move and Deciding Not to Move☆.Gilberto Gomes - 2010 - Consciousness and Cognition 19 (1):457-459.
    A commentary is given on Trevena and Miller . The comparability of their experimental task and of the potential they recorded with those used and recorded by Libet, Gleason, Wright, and Pearl is questioned. An interpretation is given for the similarity of event-related potentials recorded when subjects decided to move and when they decided not to move.
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  24. The Phenomenology of Agency and the Libet Results.Terry Horgan - 2010 - In Walter Sinnott-Armstrong & Lynn Nadel (eds.), Conscious Will and Responsibility: A Tribute to Benjamin Libet. Oup Usa. pp. 159.
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  25. Brain Preparation Before a Voluntary Action: Evidence Against Unconscious Movement Initiation.Judy Trevena & Jeff Miller - 2010 - Consciousness and Cognition 19 (1):447-456.
    Benjamin Libet has argued that electrophysiological signs of cortical movement preparation are present before people report having made a conscious decision to move, and that these signs constitute evidence that voluntary movements are initiated unconsciously. This controversial conclusion depends critically on the assumption that the electrophysiological signs recorded by Libet, Gleason, Wright, and Pearl are associated only with preparation for movement. We tested that assumption by comparing the electrophysiological signs before a decision to move with signs present before a decision (...)
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  26. Biases in the Subjective Timing of Perceptual Events: Libet Et Al. (1983) Revisited.Adam N. Danquah, Martin J. Farrell & Donald J. O’Boyle - 2008 - Consciousness and Cognition 17 (3):616-627.
    We report two experiments in which participants had to judge the time of occurrence of a stimulus relative to a clock. The experiments were based on the control condition used by Libet, Gleason, Wright, and Pearl [Libet, B., Gleason, C. A., Wright, E. W., & Pearl, D. K. . Time of conscious intention to act in relation to onset of cerebral activities : The unconscious initiation of a freely voluntary act. Brain 106, 623–642] to correct for any bias in the (...)
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  27. Biases in the Subjective Timing of Perceptual Events: Libet Et Al.(1983) Revisited.Adam N. Danquah, Martin J. Farrell & Donald J. O’Boyle - 2008 - Consciousness and Cognition 17 (3):616-627.
    We report two experiments in which participants had to judge the time of occurrence of a stimulus relative to a clock. The experiments were based on the control condition used by Libet, Gleason, Wright, and Pearl [Libet, B., Gleason, C. A., Wright, E. W., & Pearl, D. K. . Time of conscious intention to act in relation to onset of cerebral activities : The unconscious initiation of a freely voluntary act. Brain 106, 623–642] to correct for any bias in the (...)
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  28. Benjamin Libet's Work on the Neuroscience of Free Will.William P. Banks & Susan Pockett - 2007 - In Max Velmans & Susan Schneider (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Consciousness. Blackwell. pp. 657--670.
  29. "Mind Time: The Temporal Factor in Consciousness" by Benjamin Libet. [REVIEW]Tim Crane - 2007 - The Times Literary Supplement 1.
    After a lecture in Göteborg by the neuroscientist Benjamin Libet in 1993, the Göteborg-Post carried the headline, ‘Now it has been proven: we are all somewhat behind’. The paper was referring to Libet’s celebrated discovery that the neural precursors of some voluntary actions occur before the conscious awareness of the decision to act. In a series of experiments in the 1980s, Libet showed that in an experimental situation in which subjects were asked to perform a simple voluntary action – raising (...)
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  30. Timing in Cognition and EEG Brain Dynamics: Discreteness Versus Continuity.Andrew A. Fingelkurts & Alexander A. Fingelkurts - 2006 - Cognitive Processing 7 (3):135-162.
    This article provides an overview of recent developments in solving the timing problem (discreteness vs. continuity) in cognitive neuroscience. Both theoretical and empirical studies have been considered, with an emphasis on the framework of Operational Architectonics (OA) of brain functioning (Fingelkurts and Fingelkurts, 2001, 2005). This framework explores the temporal structure of information flow and interarea interactions within the network of functional neuronal populations by examining topographic sharp transition processes in the scalp EEG, on the millisecond scale. We conclude, based (...)
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  31. The Timing of Brain Events: Reply to the “Special Section” in This Journal of September 2004, Edited by Susan Pockett.Benjamin Libet - 2006 - Consciousness and Cognition 15 (3):540-547.
    In this “Reply” paper, the arguments and experimental findings by Pockett, Pollen, and Haggard et al. are analyzed. It had been shown that a 0.5 s duration of repetitive activations of sensory cortex is required to produce a threshold of sensation. The view that this is due to a facilitatory buildup in excitatory state to finally elicit neuronal firing is shown to be incompatible with several lines of evidence. Objections to the phenomenon of subjective referral backwards in time are also (...)
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  32. Commentary: The Timing of Brain Events.Benjamin Libet - 2006 - Consciusness and Cognition 15:540--547.
  33. Free Will: Theories, Analysis, and Data.Alfred R. Mele - 2006 - In Susan Pockett, William P. Banks & Shaun Gallagher (eds.), Does Consciousness Cause Behavior? MIT Press. pp. 187-205.
    Alfred Mele develops a conceptual analysis of some of the concepts that inform the recent experimental studies of intentional action. Based on a distinction between unconscious urge and conscious decision, he suggests that the neural activity described by Libet’s experiments may represent an urge to move rather than a decision to do so, and that the decision to move might be made only when the subject becomes conscious of the urge. If this is the case, then Libet’s experiments do not (...)
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  34. The Timing of Brain Events: Authors’ Response to Libet’s ‘Reply’.David A. Oakley & Patrick Haggard - 2006 - Consciousness and Cognition 15 (3):548-550.
  35. The Great Subjective Back-Referral Debate: Do Neural Responses Increase During a Train of Stimuli?Susan Pockett - 2006 - Consciousness and Cognition 15 (3):551-559.
    Evidence is summarised for and against the hypothesis that potentiation or facilitation of neural responses during a train of threshold-level stimuli occurred in the experiments reported by Libet et al. . It is concluded that such potentiation probably did occur. Since the main arguments for the existence of subjective backwards referral take it as given that such potentiation did not occur, it is further concluded that the main arguments for the existence of subjective backwards referral fail.
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  36. Brain Stimulation and Conscious Experience: Electrical Stimulation of the Cortical Surface at a Threshold Current Evokes Sustained Neuronal Activity Only After a Prolonged Latency.Daniel A. Pollen - 2006 - Consciousness and Cognition 15 (3):560-565.
    Libet demonstrated that a substantial duration (>0.5-1.0 s) of direct electrical stimulation of the surface of a sensory cortex at a threshold or liminal current is required before a subject can experience a percept. Libet and his co-workers originally proposed that the result could be due either to spatial and temporal facilitation of the underlying neurons or additionally to a prolonged central processing time. However, over the next four decades, Libet chose to attribute the prolonged latency for evoking conscious experience (...)
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  37. Sensitivity to Interpersonal Timing at 3 and 6 Months of Age.Tricia Striano, Anne Henning & Daniel Stahl - 2006 - Interaction Studies. Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies / Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies 7 (2):251-271.
    Sensitivity to interpersonal timing was assessed in mother–infant interaction. In Study 1, 3-month-old infants interacted with their mothers over television and the mothers’ audio-visual presentation was either live or temporally delayed by 1 second. Infants gazed longer when the mother was presented live compared to delayed by 1 second, indicating that they detected the temporal delay. In Study 2, mothers interacted with their 3-month-old infants over television and the infants’ audio-visual presentation was either live or temporally delayed by 1 second. (...)
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  38. On Determinism and Freedom.Ted Honderich - 2005 - Edinburgh Up.
    This is a draft of a paper for a book Philosophy of Action: 5 Questions edited by Jesus Aguilar and Andrei Buckareff and to be published by Automatic Press / VIP. The book contains accounts by various philosophers, including leading theorists, of their engagement with problems of action and agency, and in particular determinism and freedom. The contributors also offer thoughts as to what attracted them to the subject, what their conclusions have been, what the benefit of the subject can (...)
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  39. On Benjamin Libet: Is the Mind Ahead of the Brain? Behind It?Ted Honderich - 2005 - In On Determinism and Freedom. Edinburgh University Press.
    Benjamin Libet and also Libet and collaborators claim to advance a single hypothesis, with important consequences, about the time of a conscious experience in relation to the time when there occurs a certain physical condition in the brain. This condition is spoken of as " _neural_ " _adequacy_ for the experience, or, as we can as well say, _neural adequacy_. 5 This finding has been taken to throw doubt on theories that take neural and mental events to be in necessary (...)
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  40. Libet's Impossible Demand.Neil Levy - 2005 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (12):67-76.
    Abstract : Libet’s famous experiments, showing that apparently we become aware of our intention to act only after we have unconsciously formed it, have widely been taken to show that there is no such thing as free will. If we are not conscious of the formation of our intentions, many people think, we do not exercise the right kind of control over them. I argue that the claim this view presupposes, that only consciously initiated actions could be free, places a (...)
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  41. Anticipatory Consciousness, Libet's Veto and a Close-Enough Theory of Free Will.Azim F. Shariff & Jordan B. Peterson - 2005 - In Ralph D. Ellis & Natika Newton (eds.), Consciousness & Emotion: Agency, Conscious Choice, and Selective Perception. John Benjamins.
  42. Adaptive Neural Models of Queuing and Timing in Fluent Action.D. Bullock - 2004 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (9):426-433.
  43. Mind Time: The Temporal Factor in Consciousness.Benjamin W. Libet - 2004 - MIT Press.
    Over a long career, Libet has conducted experiments that have shown, in clear and concrete ways, how the brain produces conscious awareness.
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  44. Does Consciousness Cause Behaviour?Susan Pockett - 2004 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 11 (2):23-40.
  45. Hypnosis and the Death of "Subjective Backwards Referral".Susan Pockett - 2004 - Consciousness and Cognition 13 (3):621-25.
  46. Brain Stimulation and Conscious Experience.Daniel A. Pollen - 2004 - Consciousness and Cognition 13 (3):626-645.
    Libet discovered that a substantial duration (> 0.5-1.0 s) of direct electrical stimulation of the surface of the somatosensory cortex at threshold currents is required before human subjects can report that a conscious somatosensory experience had occurred. Using a reaction time method we confirm that a similarly long stimulation duration at threshold currents is required for activation of elementary visual experiences (phosphenes) in human subjects following stimulation of the surface of the striate cortex. However, the reaction times for the subject (...)
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  47. The Timing of Meals.Jan H. Strubbe & Stephen C. Woods - 2004 - Psychological Review 111 (1):128-141.
  48. Psychological and Physiological Characteristics of a Proposed Object-Referral/Self-Referral Continuum of Self-Awareness.Frederick Travis, Alarik Arenander & David DuBois - 2004 - Consciousness and Cognition 13 (2):401-420.
    This research extends and confirms recent brainwave findings that distinguished an individual’s sense-of-self along an Object-referral/Self-referral Continuum of self-awareness. Subjects were interviewed and were given tests measuring inner/outer orientation, moral reasoning, anxiety, and personality. Scores on the psychological tests were factor analyzed. The first unrotated PCA component of the test scores yielded a “Consciousness Factor,” analogous to the intelligence “g” factor, which accounted for over half of the variance among groups. Analysis of unstructured interviews of these subjects revealed fundamentally different (...)
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  49. Timing of Conscious Experience: Reply to the 2002 Commentaries on Libet’s Findings.Benjamin Libet - 2003 - Consciousness and Cognition 12 (3):321-331.
  50. On Timing Relations Between Brain and World.William P. Banks - 2002 - Consciousness and Cognition 11 (2):141-143.
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