New Confucianism

Edited by Stephen C. Angle (Wesleyan University)
Assistant editor: Maxwell Fong (Wesleyan University)
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  1. Reply to Critics.Stephen C. Angle - 2013 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (3):381-388.
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  2. Contemporary Confucian Political Philosophy: Toward Progressive Confucianism.Stephen C. Angle - 2012 - Polity.
    This book provides an accessible introduction to the main perspectives and topics being debated today, and shows why Progressive Confucianism is a particularly promising approach.
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  3. A Reply to Fan Ruiping.Stephen C. Angle - 2010 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (4):463-464.
    A Reply to F an Ruiping Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s11712-010-9189-7 Authors Stephen C. Angle, Department of Philosophy, Wesleyan University, 350 High Street, Middletown, CT 06459, USA Journal Dao Online ISSN 1569-7274 Print ISSN 1540-3009.
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  4. Fan, Ruiping, Reconstructionist Confucianism: Rethinking Morality After the West. [REVIEW]Stephen C. Angle - 2010 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (3):353-357.
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  5. New Confucianism: A Critical Examination, Edited by John Makeham. [REVIEW]Stephen C. Angle - 2004 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 31 (4):535–540.
    This collection of essays explores the development of the New Confucianism movement during the 20th century and questions whether it is, in fact, a distinctly new intellectual movement or one that has been mostly retrospectively created. The questions that contributors to this book seek to answer about this neo-conservative philosophical movement include: “What has been the cross-fertilization between Chinese scholars in China and overseas made possible by the shared discourse of Confucianism?” “To what extent does this discourse transcend geographical, political, (...)
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  6. Human Rights in Chinese Thought: A Cross-Cultural Inquiry.Stephen C. Angle - 2002 - Cambridge University Press.
    What should we make of claims by members of other groups to have moralities different from our own? Human Rights in Chinese Thought gives an extended answer to this question in the first study of its kind. It integrates a full account of the development of Chinese rights discourse - reaching back to important, though neglected, origins of that discourse in 17th and 18th century Confucianism - with philosophical consideration of how various communities should respond to contemporary Chinese claims about (...)
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  7. Philosophy of Doctrinal Classification: Kōyama Iwao and Mou Zongsan.Tomomi Asakura - 2014 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (4):453-468.
    Doctrinal classification or the panjiao 判教 system of Chinese Buddhism has been rediscovered and renewed in modern East Asian philosophy since both the Kyoto School and New Confucianism clarified the philosophical meaning of this intellectual tradition. The theoretical relation between these two modern reconsiderations, however, has not yet been studied. I analyze the theory of panjiao in Kōyama Iwao 高山岩男 and Mou Zongsan 牟宗三 so as to identify and extract, despite their apparent irrelevance, the same type of philosophical argument concerning (...)
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  8. 'Higashiajia ni tetsugaku wa nai' noka: Kyoto gakuha to Shinjuka (The Problem of East Asian Philosophy: the Kyoto School and New Confucianism).Tomomi Asakura - 2014 - Iwanami Shoten.
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  9. On the Principle of Comparative East Asian Philosophy: Nishida Kitarō and Mou Zongsan.Tomomi Asakura - 2013 - National Central University Journal of Humanities 54:1-25.
    Recent research both on the Kyoto School and on the contemporary New Confucians suggests significant similarities between these two modern East Asian philosophies. Still missing is, however, an explanation of the shared philosophical ideas that serve as the foundation for comparative studies. For this reason, I analyze the basic theories of the two distinctly East Asian philosophies of Nishida Kitarō (1870-1945) and Mou Zongsan (1909-95) so as to identify and extract the same type of argument. This is an alternative to (...)
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  10. On Buddhistic Ontology: A Comparative Study of Mou Zongsan and Kyoto School Philosophy.Tomomi Asakura - 2011 - Philosophy East and West 61 (4):647-678.
    Mou Zongsan's notion of "Buddhistic ontology" is interpreted here in its fundamental difference from his own previous metaphysical scheme, in the light of the Kyoto School philosophers' similar attempts to resolve the Kantian antinomy of practical reason. This is an alternative both to the analysis provided by previous interpreters of Mou's Buddhistic philosophy, such as Hans-Rudolf Kantor and N. Serina Chan, and to the comparative studies of Mou's theories with Kyoto School philosophy by Ng Yu-kwan. Previous researchers considered Mou's Buddhist (...)
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  11. Liang Shuming Kou Shu Shi Lu.Ji'an Bai - 2009 - Tuan Jie Chu Ban She.
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  12. Riding the Third Wave: T U Weiming's Confucian Axiology.John B. Berthrong - 2008 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (4):423-435.
    Weiming) has assisted in defining the New Confucian movement, a philosophical discourse that depends on axiological themes and traits based on an exegesis and defense of the revival and reform of traditional Confucian discourse inherited from the Classical and Neo-Confucian waves in East Asia. Thomas A. Metzger’s discussion of the profound difference between modern Western post-Enlightenment discourse and New Confucian discourse challenges many of Du’s primary assumptions. My conclusion is that Du is both a citizen of the modern Western academy (...)
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  13. Clower, Jason: The Unlikely Buddhologist, Tiantai Buddhism in Mou Zongsan's New Confucianism.Sébastien Billioud - 2012 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (1):101-104.
    Clower, Jason: The Unlikely Buddhologist, Tiantai Buddhism in M ou Zongsan’s New Confucianism Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-4 DOI 10.1007/s11712-011-9261-y Authors Sébastien Billioud, Univ Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité. UFR LCAO/East Asian Studies Department, Case 7009, 16 rue Marguerite Duras, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 Paris, France Journal Dao Online ISSN 1569-7274 Print ISSN 1540-3009.
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  14. Thinking Through Confucian Modernity: A Study of Mou Zongsan's Moral Metaphysics.Sébastien Billioud - 2011 - Brill.
    This book explores a pivotal dimension of Mou Zongsan’s philosophy—that is, his project of reconstructing a moral metaphysics based largely on a dialogue between reinterpreted Chinese thought and Kantism—and thoroughly analyzes a ...
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  15. Mou Zongsan's Problem with the Heideggerian Interpretation of Kant.Sébastien Billioud - 2006 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 33 (2):225–247.
    The article elucidates the modern Chinese philosopher Mou Zongsan's relation to the philosophy of Martin Heidegger. It postulates that Mou's appropriation of Immanuel Kant to build up his metaphysical system encountered one real obstacle, which was Heidegger's interpretation of the "Critique of Pure Reason" in the "Kantbuch." Heidegger and Mou both link their conceptions of the Self with understandings of ontology which are totally incompatible.
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  16. God's Knowledge and Ours: Kant and Mou Zongsan on Intellectual Intuition.Nicholas Bunnin - 2008 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 35 (4):613-624.
    This article examines Mou Zongsan's claim that “if it is true that human beings cannot have intellectual intuition, then the whole of Chinese philosophy must collapse completely, and the thousands years of effort must be in vain. It is just an illusion.” I argue that Mou's commitment to establishing and justifying a “moral metaphysics” was his main motivation for rejecting Kant's denial of the possibility of humans having intellectual intuition. I consider the implications of Mou's response to Kant for the (...)
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  17. Review of David Jones, Ed., Confucius Now: Contemporary Encounters with the Analects. [REVIEW]Edward Butler - 2009 - Philosophy in Review 29 (5):347.
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  18. Feng Youlan Xian Sheng Ping Zhuan.Zhongde Cai - 2000 - San Lian Shu Dian (Xianggang) You Xian Gong Si.
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  19. Feng Youlan Si Xiang Yan Jiu =.Wenhua Chai (ed.) - 2010 - Ren Min Chu Ban She.
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  20. Mou Zongsan on Zen Buddhism.Chan Wing-Cheuk - 2005 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 5 (1):73-88.
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  21. 'Self-Restriction' and the Confucian Case for Democracy.Joseph Chan - 2014 - Philosophy East and West 64 (3):785-795.
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  22. Confucian Perfectionism: A Political Philosophy for Modern Times.Joseph Chan - 2014 - Princeton University Press.
    Since the very beginning, Confucianism has been troubled by a serious gap between its political ideals and the reality of societal circumstances. Contemporary Confucians must develop a viable method of governance that can retain the spirit of the Confucian ideal while tackling problems arising from nonideal modern situations. The best way to meet this challenge, Joseph Chan argues, is to adopt liberal democratic institutions that are shaped by the Confucian conception of the good rather than the liberal conception of the (...)
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  23. Democracy and Meritocracy: Toward a Confucian Perspective.Joseph Chan - 2007 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 34 (2):179–193.
  24. The Thought of Mou Zongsan.N. Serina Chan - 2011 - Brill.
    The first thorough study in English of the multi-faceted system of Mou Zongsan, this book examines key influences on the New Confucian thinker and introduces his Kantian- and Mah?y?na Fo-inflected moral metaphysical reading of the Lu-Wang ...
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  25. On Mou Zongsan's Hermeneutic Application of Buddhism.Wing-Cheuk Chan - 2011 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (2):174-189.
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  26. Mou Zongsan and Tang Junyi on Zhang Zai's and Wang Fuzhi's Philosophies of Qi : A Critical Reflection.Wing-Cheuk Chan - 2011 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (1):85-98.
    Fuzhi’s philosophies of qi. In this essay, both the strength and weakness of their interpretations will be critically examined. As a contrast, an alternative interpretation of the School of qi in Song-Ming Neo-Confucianism will be outlined. This new interpretation will uncover that, like Leibniz, Zhang Zai and Wang Fuzhi introduced a non-substantivalist approach in natural philosophy in terms of an innovative concept of force. This interpretation not only helps to show the limitations of Mou Zongsan’s and Tang Junyi’s understandings of (...)
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  27. Mou Zongsan on Confucian and Kant's Ethics: A Critical Reflection.Wing-Cheuk Chan - 2011 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (s1):146-164.
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  28. Yang, Zebo 楊澤波, an Examination of Mou Zongsan's Three-Fold Typology 牟宗三三系論論衡.Wing-cheuk Chan - 2010 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (1):133-136.
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  29. Mou Zongsan's Transformation of Kant's Philosophy.Wing-cheuk Chan - 2006 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 33 (1):125–139.
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  30. Introduction: Mou Zongsan and Chinese Buddhism.Wing-Cheuk Chan & Henry C. H. Shiu - 2011 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (2):169-173.
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  31. Neo-Confucianism and Chinese Scientific Thought.Wing-Tsit Chan - 1957 - Philosophy East and West 6 (4):309-332.
  32. Hu Shih and Chinese Philosophy.Wing-Tsit Chan - 1956 - Philosophy East and West 6 (1):3-12.
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  33. [Book Review of] a Short History of Chinese Philosophy. [REVIEW]Wing-Tsit Chan - 1951 - University of Hawaii Press.
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  34. T'ang Chün-I's Philosophy of Love.Cheung Chan-fai - 1998 - Philosophy East and West 48 (2):257-271.
    T'ang Chün-i's early work Ai-ching chih fu-yin (Gospel of love) has been much neglected by T'ang scholars. This essay argues that this text is not a caprice, and that it marks an important stage in T'ang's life and studies. Furthermore, in the history of Chinese philosophy, it is probably the first book ever written on the philosophy of love.
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  35. Li Hsing Yü Liang Chih Chang Tung-Sun Wen Hsüan.Tung-sun Chang - 1995
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  36. Existential Themes in Confucianism.Stephen Shyong Chao - 1974 - Dissertation, Depaul University
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  37. Three Political Confucianisms and Half a Century.Albert H. Y. Chen - unknown
    Modern Chinese intellectual history was dominated by rejection and criticism of much of Chinese traditional culture and thought in general and of Confucianism in particular. Chinese communism was one of the products of the May Fourth tradition of radical anti-traditionalist thought. So was Chinese liberalism, which however failed to exert significant influence on Chinese politics and society in the mainland, nor on the island of Taiwan during the authoritarian era of one-party rule by the Nationalist Party. In the early twenty-first (...)
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  38. Metaphorical Metaphysics in Chinese Philosophy: Illustrated with Feng Youlan's New Metaphysics.Derong Chen - 2011 - Lexington Books.
    In Metaphorical Metaphysics in Chinese Philosophy: Illustrated with Feng Youlan's New Metaphysics, Derong Chen examines Chinese philosophy through a critical analysis of Feng Youlan's nnew metaphysics. He views metaphysics in Chinese philosophy as a metaphorical metaphysics separate from Western metaphysics. In examining the historical influences and contemporary reaction to Feng's work, he identify's Feng's system as the continuation of the Chinese philosophical tradition. This approach is most applicable to scholars of comparative philosophy and Chinese philosophy.
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  39. The Trend of Humanism in Contemporary Chinese Philosophy.Jiaming Chen - 1997 - Philosophy Project, Centre for Modern Chinese Studies, Institute for Chinese Studies, University of Oxford.
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  40. Contemporary Chinese Philosophy.Cheng Chung-Ying & Bunnin Nicholas (eds.) - 2002 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    _Contemporary Chinese Philosophy_ features discussion of sixteen major twentieth-century Chinese philosophers. Leading scholars in the field describe and critically assess the works of these significant figures. Critically assesses the work of major comtemporary Chinese philosophers that have rarely been discussed in English. Features essays by leading scholars in the field. Includes a glossary of Chinese characters and definitions.
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  41. Preface: New Confucianism as a Philosophy of Humanity and Governance.Chung-Ying Cheng - 2011 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (s1):1-2.
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  42. Mou Zongsan Zhe Xue Yan Jiu: Dao de de Xing Shang Xue Zhi Ke Neng = Mouzongsan Zhexue Yanjiu: Daode Xingshanxue Zhi Keneng.Zhihua Cheng - 2009 - Ren Min Chu Ban She.
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  43. A Critique of Leftist Chang Tai-Nien's So-Called "Some Characteristics of Classical Chinese Philosophy".Hsiao Chieh-Fu, Chu Po-Kung, T'ang I.-Chieh & Lu Yü-San - 1971 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 2 (4):196-245.
    As early as January of 1957, at the Peking University Symposium on the Problems of the History of Chinese Philosophy, Chang Tai-nien was already attacking with his glittering words.
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  44. Confucian Thought in Postwar Taiwanese Culture.Huang Chun-Chieh - 2009 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 41 (1):28-48.
    The article examines the two forms of Confucianism in postwar Taiwan: the state ideology presented in elementary and secondary textbooks, which emphasizes governmental authority; and the intellectual tradition, with a particular emphasis on meeting the challenge of modern Western values.
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  45. The Conservative Trend of Confucianism in Taiwan After World War II.Huang Chun-Chieh - 2009 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 41 (1):49-69.
    The article discusses the conservative tendency of state Confucianism, particularly its celebration of political leaders and of the uniqueness of Chinese culture as an excuse to oppose Western values and reject political reform.
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  46. The Development of Ideas of Spiritual Value in Chinese Philosophy.T'ang Chun-I. - 1959 - Philosophy East and West 9 (1/2):32-34.
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  47. Philosophical Consciousness, Scientific Consciousness, and Moral Reason.T'ang Chün-I. - 1974 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 5 (4):72-109.
    We may have different ways of defining the nature of philosophy. One view would take philosophy to be a system of knowledge just like science; only it is a more comprehensive system that includes all science, or rather, it is a synthetic system of knowledge. Another view would take philosophy to be just a reflective and critical attitude. It purports to reflect on methods, postulates, axioms, and fundamental concepts that science relies on to build its knowledge in order to clarify (...)
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  48. My Option Between Philosophy and Religion.T'ang Chün-I. - 1974 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 5 (4):4-38.
    I wrote this essay for three reasons. First, in proofreading The Reconstruction of the Humanistic Spirit, I felt that this great pile of articles contained only general discourses on the social and cultural problems of China and the Western world but did not mention my own philosophical position and religious faith. Although the pattern and style of the essays in this book might excuse this defect, I was afraid that some of my readers would find it difficult to grasp the (...)
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  49. Religious Beliefs and Modern Chinese Culture Part II: The Religious Spirit of Confucianism.T'ang Chün-I. - 1973 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 5 (1):48-85.
    As the title suggests, in this part of the essay I am going to discuss in brief the religious spirit of Confucianism.
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  50. Cosmologies in Ancient Chinese Philosophy.T'ang Chün-I. - 1973 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 5 (1):4-47.
    My discussion in previous chapters was limited to the origin of Chinese culture and its fundamental spirit exhibited in the process of historical development. In what follows, I am going to discuss the spirit of Chinese culture in specific areas such as philosophy of nature, theory of human nature, ideals of moral life, the world of daily living, the world of ideal personalities, and the spirit of art and religion. The center of discussion will be a comparison between Chinese and (...)
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1 — 50 / 228