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  1. La Notion d'Archétype Chez Malebranche.Michel Adam - forthcoming - Les Etudes Philosophiques.
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  2. Malebranche Ou l'Individuation Perdue.Jean-Christophe Bardout - forthcoming - Les Etudes Philosophiques.
    Assurant que « nous voyons toutes choses en Dieu », autrement dit par des idées universelles et infinies, la philosophie de Malebranche se doit d'affronter le problème de la connaissance des choses singulières, seules véritablement existantes. Après avoir montré que sa pensée échoue à fonder un authentique principe d'individuation physique des corps, nous tentons de mettre en évidence une difficulté identique à théoriser une véritable connaissance des êtres matériels. Ce déplacement de la question nous semble légitime dans la mesure où (...)
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  3. Our Body Is the Measure: Malebranche and the Body-Relativity of Sensory Perception.Colin Chamberlain - forthcoming - Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy.
    Malebranche holds that sensory experience represents the world from the body’s point of view. I argue that Malebranche gives a systematic analysis of this bodily perspective in terms of the claim that the five familiar external senses and bodily awareness represent nothing but relations to the body.
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  4. Malebranche et l'exemplarisme médiéval.Kim-Sang Ong-Van-Cung - forthcoming - Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale.
    En comparant les deux auteurs que cite Malebranche Iorsqu'il met en place sa doctrine de la vision en Dieu, on montre ce qu'il y a d'irréconciliable avec l'exemplarisme augustinien et thomasien. Aucun de ces deux auteurs n'avait dit en effet que nous voyons les corps en Dieu. De plus, l'influence de l'exemplarisme sur la noétique thomasienne suppose l'efficacité des causes secondes que la notion de cause occasionnelle récuse. La vision en Dieu est pourtant une tentative pour appliquer l'exemplarisme à la (...)
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  5. Self-Love or Diffidence? Malebranche and Hume on the Love of Fame.Alison McIntyre & Julie Walsh - 2022 - Journal of Modern Philosophy 4 (1):2.
    Hume’s discussion of pride and sympathy in the _Treatise_ shows direct engagement with Malebranche’s discussion of ‘imitation’ in the _Search_. For Malebranche, imitation—both of passions and belief—and our tendency to judge ourselves by comparison, generate the passion of pride or grandeur, which plays a useful social role. However, as both cause and effect of the admiration of others, grandeur is ungrounded and thus imaginary. Hume disagrees. He invokes the principle of sympathy to explain how the evaluations of others can support (...)
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  6. Prouver sans démontrer. Malebranche et la Trinité.Jean-­Christophe Bardout - 2021 - Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 4:715-742.
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  7. How Physics Flew the Philosophers' Nest.Katherine Brading - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 88:312-20.
  8. The Most Dangerous Error: Malebranche on the Experience of Causation.Colin Chamberlain - 2021 - Philosophers' Imprint 21 (10).
    Do the senses represent causation? Many commentators read Nicolas Malebranche as anticipating David Hume’s negative answer to this question. I disagree with this assessment. When a yellow billiard ball strikes a red billiard ball, Malebranche holds that we see the yellow ball as causing the red ball to move. Given Malebranche’s occasionalism, he insists that the visual experience of causal interaction is illusory. Nevertheless, Malebranche holds that the senses represent finite things as causally efficacious. This experience of creaturely causality explains (...)
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  9. Malebranche: Theological Figure, Being 2: By Alain Badiou, Translated by Jason E. Smith and Susan Spitzer, New York, Columbia University Press, 2019, Xxxvii + 193 Pp., $35.00/£27.00.Laurie M. Johnson - 2021 - The European Legacy 27 (2):212-214.
    This book is the English translation of Alain Badiou’s seminar on Nicolas Malebranche, part of a series of seminars on Being, the One, and the Infinite. In this extraordinary seminar, originally ta...
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  10. Ideas and Explanation in Early Modern Philosophy.Kenneth L. Pearce - 2021 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 103 (2):252-280.
    Malebranche argues that ideas are representative beings existing in God. He defends this thesis by an inference to the best explanation of human perception. It is well known that Malebranche’s theory of vision in God was forcefully rejected by philosophers such as Arnauld, Locke, and Berkeley. However, the notion that ideas exist in God was not the only controversial aspect of Malebranche’s approach. Another controversy centered around Malebranche’s view that ideas are to be understood as posits in an explanatory theory. (...)
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  11. Malebranche on Intelligible Extension: A Programmatic Interpretation.Andrew Dennis Bassford - 2020 - Metaphysica: International Journal for Ontology and Metaphysics 21 (2):199-221.
    The purpose of this essay is exegesis. I explicate Nicolas Malebranche's (1674, 1678, 1688, 1714) concept of intelligible extension. I begin by detailing how the concept matured throughout Malebranche's work, and the new functions it took on within his metaphysical system. I then examine Gustav Bergmann's “axiomatic” interpretation, as well as the criticism of it offered by Daise Radner. I argue that Radner's criticism of the interpretation is only partly successful; some of her objections can be met; others cannot. I (...)
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  12. Personal Identity and Self-Interpretation & Natural Right and Natural Emotions.Gabor Boros, Judit Szalai & Oliver Toth (eds.) - 2020 - Budapest: Eötvös University Press.
  13. ‘Let Us Imagine That God has Made a Miniature Earth and Sky’: Malebranche on the Body-Relativity of Visual Size.Colin Chamberlain - 2020 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 6 (2):206-224.
    Malebranche holds that visual experience represents the size of objects relative to the perceiver's body and does not represent objects as having intrinsic or nonrelational spatial magnitudes. I argue that Malebranche's case for this body-relative thesis is more sophisticated than other commentators—most notably, Atherton and Simmons —have presented it. Malebranche's central argument relies on the possibility of perceptual variation with respect to size. He uses two thought experiments to show that perceivers of different sizes—namely, miniature people, giants, and typical human (...)
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  14. Zen Buddhist and Christian Views of Causality: A Comparative Analysis.Takaharu Oda - 2020 - Alternative Spirituality and Religion Review 11 (2):133-160.
    This article presents a new approach to Japanese Zen Buddhism, alternative to its traditional views, which lack exact definitions of the relation between the meditator and the Buddha’s ultimate cause, dharma. To this end, I offer a comparative analysis between Zen Buddhist and Christian views of causality from the medieval to early modern periods. Through this, human causation with dharma in the Zen Buddhist meditations can be better defined and understood. Despite differences between religious traditions in deliberating human causal accounts, (...)
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  15. Philo's Second Circumstance: Malebranche and the General Laws Theodicy in Hume's Dialogues.Todd Ryan - 2020 - Hume Studies 46 (1):145-166.
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  16. The Protestant and the Pelagian.Julie Walsh & Eric Stencil - 2019 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 93 (3):497-526.
    One of the longest and most acrimonious polemics in the history of philosophy is between Antoine Arnauld and Nicolas Malebranche. Their central disagreements are over the nature of ideas, theodicy, and, the topic of this paper, grace. We offer the most in-depth English language treatment of their discussion of grace to date. Our focus is one particular aspect of the polemic: the power of finite agents to assent to grace. We defend two theses. First, we show that as the debate (...)
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  17. Our Bodies, Our Selves: Malebranche on the Feelings of Embodiment.Colin Chamberlain - 2018 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 5.
    Malebranche holds that the feeling of having a body comes in three main varieties. A perceiver sensorily experiences herself (1) as causally connected to her body, in so far as the senses represent the body as causing her sensory experiences and as uniquely responsive to her will, (2) as materially connected to her body, in so far as the senses represent the perceiver as a material being wrapped up with the body, and (3) as perspectivally connected to her body, in (...)
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  18. Berkeley on Continuous Creation: Occasionalism Contained.Sukjae Lee - 2018 - In Stefan Storrie (ed.), Berkeley's Three Dialogues: New Essays. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 106-122.
  19. The Evolution Concept: The Concept Evolution.Agustin Ostachuk - 2018 - Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 14 (3):354-378.
    This is an epistemologically-driven history of the concept of evolution. Starting from its inception, this work will follow the development of this pregnant concept. However, in contradistinction to previous attempts, the objective will not be the identification of the different meanings it adopted through history, but conversely, it will let the concept to be unfolded, to be explicated and to express its own inner potentialities. The underlying thesis of the present work is, therefore, that the path that leads to the (...)
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  20. Fontenelle, Malebranche et les limites de la philosophie.Mitia Rioux-Beaulne - 2018 - Science Et Esprit 70 (1):81-99.
    L’hypothèse de travail qui régit cette contribution est que les discussions sur les rapports entre théologie et philosophie forment un thème récurrent dans la réception de Malebranche depuis les premières lectures de La Recherche de la vérité, et que cela s’explique par la rupture qu’il provoque avec les horizons d’attente des philosophes et théologiens. Rupture qui tient largement à l’enchevêtrement singulier des registres discursifs que présente son argumentaire. C’est là, nous semble-t-il, l’intérêt indéniable de la lecture – plutôt négligée par (...)
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  21. Liberté et volonté chez Bayle et Malebranche.Jean-Luc Solere - 2018 - In Le Malebranchisme à l’épreuve de ses Amis et de ses Ennemis. Paris: pp. 97-128.
    La conception malebranchiste de la liberté est originale. Malebranche ne croit pas en une liberté d’indifférence absolue, c'est-à-dire en une capacité d’opérer un choix indépendamment de toute motivation. Il ne croit pas non plus que nous puissions indifféremment choisir entre deux motivations de force inégale : au moment où on se détermine, le bien le plus grand (du moins selon l’apparence) l’emporte. La liberté réside seulement dans le fait que l’on n’est pas obligé de se déterminer : nous pouvons toujours (...)
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  22. Descartes, Malebranche, and the Crisis of Perception.Walter Ott - 2017 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    The seventeenth century witnesses the demise of two core doctrines in the theory of perception: naive realism about color, sound, and other sensible qualities and the empirical theory, drawn from Alhacen and Roger Bacon, which underwrote it. This created a problem for seventeenth century philosophers: how is that we use qualities such as color, feel, and sound to locate objects in the world, even though these qualities are not real? -/- Ejecting such sensible qualities from the mind-independent world at once (...)
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  23. Confusing Faith and Reason? Malebranche and Academic Scepticism.Julie Walsh - 2017 - In P. J. Smith & S. Charles (eds.), Academic Scepticism in the Development of Early Modern Philosophy. Springer. pp. 181-213.
    When we consider early modern philosophers who engage with sceptical arguments, Nicolas Malebranche is not usually among the first names to come to mind. But, while Malebranche does not spend much time with this topic, the way in which he responds to it when he does is nevertheless valuable. This is because his response underlines the central role of a particular principle in his system: the utter dependence of all created things on God. In this paper, I argue that the (...)
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  24. A Bodily Sense of Self in Descartes and Malebranche.Colin Chamberlain - 2016 - In Jari Kaukua & Tomas Ekenberg (eds.), Subjectivity and Selfhood in Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy. Basel, Switzerland: pp. 219-234.
    Although Descartes and Malebranche argue that we are immaterial thinking things, they also maintain that each of us stands in a unique experiential relation to a single human body, such that we feel as though this body belongs to us and is part of ourselves. This paper examines Descartes’s and Malebranche’s accounts of this feeling. They hold that our experience of being embodied is grounded in affective bodily sensations that feel good or bad: namely, sensations of pleasure and pain, hunger (...)
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  25. Les Malebranchismes des Lumières: Études Sur les Réceptions Contrastées de la Philosophie de Malebranche, Fin XVIIe Et XVIIIe Siècles. [REVIEW]Julie Walsh - 2016 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de L’Etranger 3:384-386.
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  26. Malebranche on the Metaphysics and Epistemology of Particular Volitions.Julie Walsh & Eric Stencil - 2016 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 54 (2):227-255.
    among nicolas malebranche’s most influential contributions to philosophy are his defense of occasionalism, his highly original theodicy, and his philosophical method elaborated in greatest detail in his magnum opus De la Recherche de la vérité. In his account of occasionalism, Malebranche argues that finite things have no causal power and that God is the only true causal agent. Malebranche’s theodicy—his attempt to reconcile the existence of evil in the world with the existence of an all-good and all-powerful God—is most thoroughly (...)
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  27. Jolley, Nicholas , Causality and Mind: Essays on Early Modern Philosophy . Reviewed By. [REVIEW]Markku Roinila - 2015 - Philosophy in Review 35 (2):97-99.
    Causality and Mind presents seventeen of Nicholas Jolley's essays on early modern philosophy, which focus on two main themes. One theme is the continuing debate over the nature of causality in the period from Descartes to Hume. Jolley shows that, despite his revolutionary stance, Descartes did no serious re-thinking about causality; it was left to his unorthodox disciple Malebranche to argue that there is no place for natural causality in the new mechanistic picture of the physical world. Several essays explore (...)
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  28. The Metaphysics of Rest in Descartes and Malebranche.Tad M. Schmaltz - 2015 - Res Philosophica 92 (1):21-40.
    I consider a somewhat obscure but important feature of Descartes’s physics that concerns the notion of the “force of rest.” Contrary to a prominent occasionalist interpretation of Descartes’s physics, I argue that Descartes himself attributes real forces to resting bodies. I also take his account of rest to conflict with the view that God conserves the world by “re-creating” it anew at each moment. I turn next to the role of rest in Malebranche. Malebranche takes Descartes to endorse his own (...)
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  29. Malebranche, Freedom, and the Divided Mind.Julie Walsh - 2015 - In P. Easton & K. Smith (eds.), Gods and Giants in Early Modern Philosophy. Brill. pp. 194-216.
    In this paper I argue that according to Malebranche mental attention is the corrective to epistemic error and moral lapse and constitutes the essence of human freedom. Moreover, I show how this conception of human freedom is both morally significant and compatible with occasionalism. By attending to four distinctions made by Malebranche throughout his writings we can begin to understand first, what it means for human beings to exercise their freedom in a way that has some meaningful consequence, and second, (...)
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  30. The Self-Body Problem in Descartes and Malebranche.Colin William Chamberlain - 2014 - Dissertation, Harvard University
    Descartes and Malebranche often seem to argue that the self is identical to an immaterial thinking substance distinct from the body. But there are also many passages where they insist that the body is part of the self. This means that Descartes and Malebranche have a problem, since they seem to endorse three mutually inconsistent propositions: I am an immaterial thinking thing. Immaterial things don't have bodily parts. I include my body as part of myself. I call this puzzle the (...)
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  31. Biology and Theology in Malebranche's Theory of Organic Generation.Karen Detlefsen - 2014 - In Ohad Nachtomy & Justin E. H. Smith (eds.), The Life Sciences in Early Modern Philosophy. Oxford University Press. pp. 137-156.
    This paper has two parts: In the first part, I give a general survey of the various reasons 17th and 18th century life scientists and metaphysicians endorsed the theory of pre-existence according to which God created all living beings at the creation of the universe, and no living beings are ever naturally generated anew. These reasons generally fall into three categories. The first category is theological. For example, many had the desire to account for how all humans are stained by (...)
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  32. Occasionalism and Non-Reductive Physicalism: Another Look at the Continuous Creation Argument.Daniel Lim - 2014 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 75 (1):39-57.
    Malebranche’s so-called conservation is continuous creation (CCC) argument has been celebrated as a powerful and persuasive argument for Occasionalism—the claim that only God has and exercises causal powers. In this paper I want to examine the CCC argument for Occasionalism by comparing it to Jaegwon Kim’s so-called Supervenience argument against non-reductive physicalism. Because the arguments have deep similarities it is interesting and fruitful to consider them in tandem. First I argue that both the CCC argument and the Supervenience argument turn (...)
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  33. Malebranche and the Riddle of Sensation.Walter Ott - 2014 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 88 (3):689-712.
    Like their contemporary counterparts, early modern philosophers find themselves in a predicament. On one hand, there are strong reasons to deny that sensations are representations. For there seems to be nothing in the world for them to represent. On the other hand, some sensory representations seem to be required for us to experience bodies. How else could one perceive the boundaries of a body, except by means of different shadings of color? I argue that Nicolas Malebranche offers an extreme -- (...)
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  34. Carlo Borghero. Les Cartésiens Face À Newton. Turnhout: Brepols, 2011. Pp. 156. $64.88. [REVIEW]Delphine Bellis - 2013 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 3 (2):364-367.
  35. God’s Creatures? Divine Nature and the Status of Animals in the Early Modern Beast-Machine Controversy.Lloyd Strickland - 2013 - International Journal of Philosophy and Theology 74 (4):291-309.
    In early modern times it was not uncommon for thinkers to tease out from the nature of God various doctrines of substantial physical and metaphysical import. This approach was particularly fruitful in the so-called beast-machine controversy, which erupted following Descartes’ claim that animals are automata, that is, pure machines, without a spiritual, incorporeal soul. Over the course of this controversy, thinkers on both sides attempted to draw out important truths about the status of animals simply from the notion or attributes (...)
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  36. Emotional Sensations and the Moral Imagination in Malebranche.Jordan Taylor - 2013 - In H. Martyn Lloyd (ed.), The Discourse of Sensibility: The Knowing Body in the Enlightenment. Springer.
    This paper explores the details of Malebranche‘s philosophy of mind, paying particular attention to the mind-body relationship and the roles of the imagination and the passions. I demonstrate that Malebranche has available an alternative to his deontological ethical system: the alternative I expose is based around his account of the embodied aspects of the mind and the sensations experienced in perception. I briefly argue that Hume, a philosopher already indebted to Malebranche for much inspiration, read Malebranche in the positive way (...)
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  37. Nicolas Malebranche.Julie Walsh - 2013 - In H. LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  38. Agency and Attention in Malebranche's Theory of Cognition.Deborah Brown - 2012 - In Martin Pickavé & Lisa Shapiro (eds.), Emotion and Cognitive Life in Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy. Oxford University Press. pp. 217.
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  39. Malebranche Et les Pouvoirs de L'Imagination.Raffaele Carbone & Koen Vermeir - 2012 - Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 4:661-669.
    Malebranche's ideas about the imagination have inspired philosophers over the centuries. Drawing on the writings of Aristotle, Bacon, Descartes and many other sources, Malebranche created his own innovative theory. It is especially his work on the force of the imagination, however, that was to be of lasting influence. In this introductory article, we briefly discuss Malebranche's theory of the imagination and point out its role in mathematics, contagion of ideas, monstrous births, errors of the mind and rhetoric.
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  40. Il misticismo della ragione. Alcune considerazioni sulla metafisica di Malebranche.Paolo Fabiani - 2012 - Annali Del Dipartimento di Filosofia 18:5-51.
    This paper investigates the concept of étendue intelligible, as used by Malebranche to frame a metaphysical theory on top of the concept of space, a new perspective on ideas and a solution to Cartesian issues about the nature of thought and its relationships with extension. In particular, attention is paid to the reasons why the étendue intelligible is, for Malebrance, the joining link between the human mind and God. Such a connection is emphasized not only for its metaphysical meaning but (...)
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  41. Sorcerers and Werewolves," Reveries of Demonographers". Imaginative Contagion in Malebranche.Marie-Frederique Pellegrin - 2012 - Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 67 (4):691-704.
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  42. Sorciers Et Loups-Garous, "Ręveries des Démonographes" la Contagion Imaginative Chez Malebranche.Marie-Frédérique Pellegrin - 2012 - Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 4:691-704.
    Nicolas Malebranche looks at the phenomena of imaginative contagion up to the point of madness, as in the case of the visions of sorcerers and werewolves. Although Malebranche relies on a psycho-physiological description, it becomes obvious that the responsibility for such contagions is not to be attributed to those who were expected to be the cause, that is would-be sorcerers, but to those who picked up on their deeds and gave them some importance. It is therefore the material conditions of (...)
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  43. " Les enfants voient ce que leurs mères voient": l'imaginationisme de Malebranche et sa réception au XVIIIe siècle.Mitia Rioux-Beaulne - 2012 - Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 67 (4):705-726.
    «Les enfants voient ce que leurs mères voient»: The imaginationisme of Malebranche and its reception in the eighteenth century. Book II of Malebranche’s Research After the Truth is a philosophical “tour de force” as it merges together numerous philosophical problems that were discussed separately before him, thus changing the traditional way of treating questions concerning heredity, monstrosity, sympathy and so forth. The impact it had led to it being widely discussed during the XVIII century In this paper, the author traces (...)
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  44. Malebranche and Imagination: A Psychosomatic Analysis.Marion Saliceti - 2012 - Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 67 (4):727-743.
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  45. Malebranche Et L'Imagination: Une Analyse Psychosomatique.Marion Saliceti - 2012 - Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 4:727-743.
    The article addresses Malebranche's account of imagination. The author's aim is to shed light on its original features, showing that the analysis of imagination provided is typical of the multidimensional approach Malebranche seeks to develop in what he calls his "science de l'homme". Using metaphysics and biology, as well as a psychology based on the analysis of inner feelings, passions, and the mechanisms of contagion of affects and beliefs, Malebranche describes imagination as the result of mind and body interaction. More (...)
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  46. Family Trees: Sympathy, Comparison, and the Proliferation.Amy M. Schmitter - 2012 - In Martin Pickavé & Lisa Shapiro (eds.), Emotion and Cognitive Life in Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy. Oxford University Press. pp. 255.
  47. Occasionalism: Causation Among the Cartesians.Jordan Taylor - 2012 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (3):627-630.
    British Journal for the History of Philosophy, Volume 20, Issue 3, Page 627-630, May 2012.
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  48. Nicolas Malebranche Et Bernard Lamy: Deux Perspectives Sur L'Imagination.Radu Toderici - 2012 - Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 4:745-758.
    In an attempt to trace the historical origins of Malebranche's reputation as an opponent of imagination, mainly in connection with style and eloquence, the author of this paper maintains that most of the arguments subsequently used against Malebranche may already be found in Bernard Lamy's La Rhétorique ou l'art de parler. Although Lamy might have been influenced by Malebranche, his approach to the use of passions and imagination relies rather on a theory of language and communication than on Malebranche's account (...)
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  49. Ogólna charakterystyka idei w wykładni Malebranche’a.Elżbieta Walerich - 2012 - Roczniki Filozoficzne 60 (3):15-34.
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  50. Gabriel Biel and Occasionalism: Overcoming an Apparent Tension.Fred Ablondi & J. Aaron Simmons - 2011 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 28 (2):159.
1 — 50 / 423