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  1. Nietzsche’s English Genealogy of Truthfulness.Matthieu Queloz - forthcoming - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie.
    This paper aims to increase our understanding of the genealogical method by taking a developmental approach to Nietzsche’s genealogical methodology and reconstructing an early instance of it: Nietzsche’s genealogy of truthfulness in On Truth and Lie. Placing this essay against complementary remarks from his notebooks, I show that Nietzsche’s early use of the genealogical method concerns imagined situations before documented history, aims to reveal practical necessity before contingency, and focuses on vindication before it turns to subversion or problematization. I argue (...)
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  2. Nietzsche's Intuitions.Justin Remhof - forthcoming - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy:1-22.
    This essay examines a particular rhetorical strategy Nietzsche uses to supply prima facie epistemic justification: appeals to intuition. I first investigate what Nietzsche thinks intuitions are, given that he never uses the term ‘intuition’ as we do in contemporary philosophy. I then examine how Nietzsche can simultaneously endorse naturalism and intuitive appeals. I finish by looking at why and how Nietzsche uses appeals to intuition to further his philosophical agenda. Answering these questions should provide a deeper understanding of how Nietzsche (...)
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  3. Nietzsche: Metaphysician.Justin Remhof - 2021 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 7 (1):117-132.
    Perhaps the most fundamental disagreement concerning Nietzsche's view of metaphysics is that some commentators believe Nietzsche has a positive, systematic metaphysical project, and others deny this. Those who deny it hold that Nietzsche believes metaphysics has a special problem, that is, a distinctively problematic feature that distinguishes metaphysics from other areas of philosophy. In this paper, I investigate important features of Nietzsche's metametaphysics in order to argue that Nietzsche does not, in fact, think metaphysics has a special problem. The result (...)
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  4. “Being Just Is Always a Positive Attitude”: Justice in Nietzsche's Virtue Epistemology.Rachel Cristy - 2019 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 50 (1):33-57.
    In the second of the UM, "On the Uses and Disadvantages of History for Life", Nietzsche delivers a rare and lengthy encomium to the traditional Platonic-Aristotelian virtue of justice. "In truth," he says, "no one has a greater claim to our veneration than he who possesses the drive to and strength for justice. For the highest and rarest virtues are united and concealed in justice as in an unfathomable ocean that receives streams and rivers from all sides and takes them (...)
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  5. Artificial and Unconscious Selection in Nietzsche's Genealogy: Expectorating the Poisoned Pill of the Lamarckian Reading.Brian Lightbody - 2019 - Genealogy 3:1-23.
    I examine three kinds of criticism directed at philosophical genealogy. I call these substantive, performative, and semantic. I turn my attention to a particular substantive criticism that one may launch against essay two of On the Genealogy of Morals that turns on how Nietzsche answers “the time-crunch problem”. On the surface, there is evidence to suggest that Nietzsche accepts a false scientific theory, namely, Lamarck’s Inheritability Thesis, in order to account for the growth of a new human “organ”—morality. I demonstrate (...)
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  6. The Epistemic Function of Contempt and Laughter in Nietzsche.Mark Alfano - 2018 - In Michelle Mason (ed.), The Moral Psychology of Contempt. Rowman & Littlefield.
    Interpreters have noticed that Nietzsche, in addition to sometimes being uproariously funny, reflects more on laughter and having a sense of humor than almost any other philosopher. Several scholars have further noticed that Nietzschean laughter sometimes seems to have an epistemic function. In this chapter, I assume that Nietzsche is a pluralist about the functions of humor and laughter, and seek to establish the uses he finds for them. I offer an interpretation according to which he tactically uses humor and (...)
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  7. Review of Tsarina Doyle, Nietzsche's Metaphysics of the Will to Power: The Possibility of Value. [REVIEW]Justin Remhof - 2018 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 5.
    Review of Tsarnia Doyle, Nietzsche's Metaphysics of the Will to Power: The Possibility of Value.
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  8. A Nietzschean Critique of Metaphysical Philosophy.Jonathan Mitchell - 2017 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 48 (3):347.
    This article provides a new account of Nietzsche’s critique of metaphysical philosophy. After framing Nietzsche’s anti-metaphysical project (Section 1), I suggest that to understand the logic of his critique we should reconstruct a taxonomy which distinguishes between ‘rich metaphysics’ and ‘thin metaphysics’ (Section 2). I then consider Nietzsche’s methodological critique of ‘rich metaphysics’, arguing that his position, which alleges motivational bias against ‘rich metaphysics’, is not compelling, since even granting that previous ‘rich metaphysicians’ exemplified such bias there is no necessity (...)
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  9. Scientific Fictionalism and the Problem of Inconsistency in Nietzsche. Remhof - 2016 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 47 (2):238-246.
    Fictionalism plays a significant role in philosophy today, with defenses spanning mathematics, morality, ordinary objects, truth, modality, and more.1 Fictionalism in the philosophy of science is also gaining attention, due in particular to the revival of Hans Vaihinger’s work from the early twentieth century and to heightened interest in idealization in scientific practice.2 Vaihinger maintains that there is a ubiquity of fictions in science and, among other things, argues that Nietzsche supports the position. Yet, while contemporary commentators have focused on (...)
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  10. Nietzsche's Conception of Truth: Correspondence, Coherence, or Pragmatist? Remhof - 2015 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 46 (2):239-248.
    Nearly every common theory of truth has been attributed to Nietzsche, while some commentators have argued that he simply has no theory of truth. This essay argues that Nietzsche's remarks on truth are best situated within either the coherence or pragmatist theories of truth rather than the correspondence theory. Nietzsche's thoughts on truth conflict with the correspondence framework because he believes that the truth conditions of propositions are constitutively dependent on our actions.
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  11. Nietzsche on Objects.Justin Remhof - 2015 - Nietzsche-Studien 44 (1).
    Nietzsche was persistently concerned with what an object is and how different views of objects lead to different views of facts, causality, personhood, substance, truth, mathematics and logic, and even nihilism. Yet his treatment of objects is incredibly puzzling. In many passages he assumes that objects such as trees and leaves, tables and chairs, and dogs and cats are just ordinary entities of experience. In other places he reports that objects do not exist. Elsewhere he claims that objects exist, but (...)
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  12. Nietzsche and Mechanism. On the Use of History for Science.Pietro Gori - 2014 - In Helmut Heit & Lisa Heller (eds.), Handbuch Nietzsche und die Wissenschaften. de Gruyter. pp. 119-137.
    This paper is devoted to a comparison between Ernst Mach's and Friedrich Nietzsche's anti-metaphysical approach to scientific and philosophical concepts. By making reference to Mach’s early essay on the conservation of energy (Die Geschichte und die Wurzel des Satzes von der Erhaltung der Arbeit, 1872), I argue that Nietzsche shares with him the idea that the concepts we adopt are only useful fictions developed during the history of humankind and its culture. This idea is fundamental for the development of modern (...)
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  13. The Most Agreeable of All Vices: Nietzsche as Virtue Epistemologist.Mark Alfano - 2013 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (4):767-790.
    It’s been argued with some justice by commentators from Walter Kaufmann to Thomas Hurka that Nietzsche’s positive ethical position is best understood as a variety of virtue theory – in particular, as a brand of perfectionism. For Nietzsche, value flows from character. Less attention has been paid, however, to the details of the virtues he identifies for himself and his type. This neglect, along with Nietzsche’s frequent irony and non-standard usage, has obscured the fact that almost all the virtues he (...)
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  14. Nietzsche and the Ancient Skeptical Tradition. [REVIEW]Rebecca Bamford - 2013 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 51 (1):138-140.
    Jessica Berry provides the first detailed analysis of whether, and in what sense, Nietzsche was a skeptic (5). Exploring the affinity between Nietzsche’s work and Pyrrhonism in six main chapters, Berry differentiates between modern skepticism, understood as epistemological pessimism or nihilism (33), and Pyrrhonian skepticism as a commitment to continuing inquiry, based on the equipollence of arguments, “roughly equal persuasive weight for and against just about any claim,” and epochē, suspension of judgment (36–37). Berry shows that Nietzsche appreciated this distinction (...)
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  15. Benjamin Gittel: Lebendige Erkenntnis und ihre literarische Kommunikation. Robert Musil im Kontext der Lebensphilosophie [Living knowledge and its communication through literature. Robert Musil in the context of Lebensphilosophie].Benjamin Gittel - 2013 - Münster, Germany: mentis.
    This study seeks to contribute to the current debate in literary studies, philosophy, and the history of science about knowledge’s forms of representation and the “knowledge of literature,” while in two respects also going beyond the debate. First, it shows how and why the demand for an alternative non-scientific form of knowledge mediated by literature becomes widespread within a particular constellation in the history of ideas. In particular, it situates this phenomenon within the philosophy of life (Lebensphilosophie) and the so-called (...)
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  16. Nietzsche and the Unfolding of Mind.Christoph Schuringa - 2013 - Nietzscheforschung 20 (1):279-287.
  17. Nietzsche as Phenomenalist?Pietro Gori - 2012 - In Marco Brusotti, Günter Abel & Helmut Heit (eds.), Nietzsches Wissenschaftsphilosophie. Berlin/Boston: deGruyter. pp. 345-356.
    During the second decade of the 20th century Hans Kleinpeter, an Austrian scholar devoted to the development of the modern science, published some brief papers on Nietzsche’s thought. Kleinpeter has been one of the main upholders of Mach’s epistemology and probably the first who connected his ideas with the philosophy of Nietzsche. In his book on Der Phänomenalismus (1913) he described a new world view that arose in the 19th century, a perspective that ‒ according to him ‒ completely contrasted (...)
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  18. Nietzsche on Agency and Self-Ignorance.Paul Katsafanas - 2012 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 43 (1):5-17.
    Nietzsche frequently claims that agents are in some sense ignorant of their own actions. In this conference paper, I ask two questions: what exactly does Nietzsche mean by this claim, and how would the truth of this claim affect philosophical models of agency? I argue that Nietzsche's claim about self-ignorance is intended to draw attention to the fact that there are influences upon reflective episodes of choice that have three features. First, these influences are pervasive, occurring in every episode of (...)
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  19. Contra Leiter’s Anti-Skeptical Interpretation of Nietzsche’s Perspectivism.Justin Marquis - 2012 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 12 (1):69-75.
    Nietzsche, in his work On the Genealogy of Morals, argues that human cognition is analogous in certain significant respects to the perspectival nature of optical vision. Because of this analogy, his account of human cognition is often referred to as perspectivism. Brian Leiter argues that Nietzsche’s use of this optical perspective metaphor undermines interpretations that take perspectivism to have radically skeptical implications. In this paper, I examine Leiter’s argument and show that the considerations he raises based on the optical perspective (...)
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  20. Truth, Perspectivism, and Philosophy.David Simpson - 2012 - eLogos 2012 (2):1-17.
    In Nietzsche’s later work the problem of the possibility of philosophy presents a significant interpretative and practical dilemma. Nietzsche attempts to undermine the idea of the absolute, as a source of value, meaning and truth, and to tease out the traces of this idea in our philosophising. He is thus one of those who has given us the means to complete the Kantian project of moving beyond metaphysical realism and a representational understanding of meaning. However, along with the gift comes (...)
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  21. Nietzsche on Epistemology and Metaphysics: The World in View.Joseph Ward - 2011 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 19 (4):628 - 633.
    International Journal of Philosophical Studies, Volume 19, Issue 4, Page 628-633, October 2011.
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  22. Nietzsche and the Ancient Skeptical Tradition.Jessica N. Berry - 2010 - Oxford University Press.
    Introduction : reading Nietzsche skeptically -- Nietzsche and the Pyrrhonian tradition -- Skepticism in Nietzsche's early work : the case of "on truth and lie" -- The question of Nietzsche's "naturalism" -- Perspectivism and Ephexis in interpretation -- Skepticism and health -- Skepticism as immoralism.
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  23. Fenomenalismo e prospettivismo in Gaia scienza 354.Pietro Gori - 2010 - In Chiara Piazzesi, Giuliano Campioni & Patrick Wotling (eds.), Letture della Gaia Scienza. ETS.
    «Questo è il vero fenomenalismo e prospettivismo, come lo intendo io», scrive Nietzsche in FW 354, chiudendo una lunga riflessione sul tema della coscienza e del bisogno di comunicazione dell’uomo. Mantenendo sullo sfondo le questioni più strettamente legate alla dimensione psicologica, vorrei partire da questa dichiarazione per considerare alcuni aspetti della teoria della conoscenza di Nietzsche ed intervenire in una nuova determinazione del suo carattere prospettico. In particolare, vorrei soffermarmi sul tema del gregge umano e della specie come reale soggetto (...)
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  24. Must Nietzsche Be Incorporated Into Hermeneutics? Some Reasons for a Little Resistance.Jean Grondin - 2010 - Iris. European Journal of Philosophy and Public Debate 2 (3):105-122.
    The question of Nietzsche's place in hermeneutics raises many questions: can Nietzsche's thought itself be characterized as "hermeneutical" and to what extent, given that hermeneutics was only developed as such after him? Can and should hermeneutics, which until recently did not take his thought much into account, incorporate Nietzsche's thought as a whole? Whereas a mutual fecundation will always be fruitful, this paper argues that one should resist a simple integration of Nietzsche into hermeneutics in light of their different understandings (...)
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  25. Nietzsche, Perspectivism, Anti-Realism: An Inconsistent Triad.Brian Lightbody - 2010 - The European Legacy 15 (4):425-438.
    “Philosophical perspectivism” is surely one of Nietzsche's most important insights regarding the limits of human knowledge. However, the perspectivist thesis combined with a minimal realist metaphysical position produces what Brian Leiter calls the 'Received View': an epistemologically incoherent misinterpretation of Nietzsche which pervades the secondary literature. In order to salvage the thesis of perspectivism, Leiter argues that we must commit Nietzsche to an anti-realist metaphysical position. I argue that Leiter's proposed solution is (1) epistemically weak, and (2) inconsistent with much (...)
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  26. Nietzsche on Epistemology and Metaphysics: The World in View.Tsarina Doyle - 2009 - Edinburgh University Press.
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  27. The Usefulness of Substances. Knowledge, Science and Metaphysics in Nietzsche and Mach.Pietro Gori - 2009 - Nietzsche Studien 38:111-155.
    In this paper I discuss the role played by Ernst Mach on Nietzsche’s thought. Starting from the contents of his Beiträge zur Analyse der Empfindungen, I’ll show the close similarities between their view on both human knowledge and the scientific world description. In his writing on science Nietzsche shares Mach’s critique to the 19th century mechanism and its metaphysical ground, as much as his way of defining the substantial notions such as matter, ego and free will. Moreover, my investigation will (...)
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  28. Book ReviewsTamsin Shaw,. Nietzsche’s Political Skepticism.Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2007. Pp. X+159. $24.95. [REVIEW]William R. Schroeder - 2009 - Ethics 119 (2):390-394.
  29. Skepticism in Nietzsche’s Earliest Work: Another Look at Nietzsche’s “On Truth and Lies in an Extra-Moral Sense‘.Jessica N. Berry - 2006 - International Studies in Philosophy 38 (3):33-48.
  30. Nietzsche’s Perspectivism and Problems of Self-Refutation.Nick Trakakis - 2006 - International Philosophical Quarterly 46 (1):91-110.
    Nietzsche’s perspectivism has aroused the perplexity of many a recent commentator, not least because of the doctrine’s apparent self-refuting character. If, as Nietzsche holds, there are no facts but only interpretations, then how are we to understand this claim itself? Nietzsche’s perspectivism must be construed either as a fact or as one further interpretation—but in the former case the doctrine is clearly self-refuting, while in the latter case any reasons or arguments one may have in support of one’s perspective are (...)
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  31. Nietzsche on Truth, Illusion, and Redemption.R. Lanier Anderson - 2005 - European Journal of Philosophy 13 (2):185–225.
  32. Who's Afraid of Idealism?Luis M. Augusto - 2005 - University Press of America.
    In Who's Afraid of Idealism? the philosophical concept of idealism, the extent to which reality is mind-made, is examined in new light. Author Luis M. Augusto explores epistemological idealism, at the source of all other kinds of idealism, from the viewpoints of Immanuel Kant and Friedrich Nietzsche, two philosophers who spent a large part of their lives denigrating the very concept. Working from Kant and Nietzsche's viewpoints that idealism was a scandal to philosophy and the cause of nihilism, Augusto evaluates (...)
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  33. La ambivalencia de sentido en el lenguaje y en el pensamiento de Nietzsche.Marco Parmeggiani - 2005 - In J. Quesada – J. E. Esteban Enguita (ed.), Nietzsche bifronte. Madrid, Spain: Biblioteca Nueva. pp. 193-222.
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  34. Philosophy as Fiction: Self, Deception, and Knowledge in Proust.Joshua Landy - 2004 - Oxford University Press.
    Philosophy as Fiction seeks to account for the peculiar power of philosophical literature by taking as its case study the paradigmatic generic hybrid of the twentieth century, Marcel Proust's In Search of Lost Time. At once philosophical--in that it presents claims, and even deploys arguments concerning such traditionally philosophical issues as knowledge, self-deception, selfhood, love, friendship, and art--and literary, in that its situations are imaginary and its stylization inescapably prominent, Proust's novel presents us with a conundrum. How should it be (...)
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  35. Nietzsche’s Perspectivism.Tsarina Doyle - 2001 - International Philosophical Quarterly 41 (2):249-250.
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  36. "Les Moi En Moi": The Proustian Self in Philosophical Perspective.Joshua Landy - 2001 - New Literary History 1 ( 32):91-132.
    This essay discusses Proust’s theory of selfhood. Throughout the novel, it argues, Proust’s protagonist struggles with the problem of finding or constructing a self that is both unique and enduring, in the face not only of change across time but also of serious division at any given moment, as the various faculties vie for control. Involuntary memory offers a partial solution, by revealing the existence within us of an aspect that is both individuating and stable—namely, our perspective. Our perspective, however, (...)
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  37. Nietzsche and Wittgenstein: On Truth, Perspectivism, and Certainty.Shoshana Ronen - 2001 - Dialogue and Universalism 11 (5-6):97-116.
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  38. Nietzsche's Perspectivism.Steven D. Hales & Rex Welshon - 2000 - University of Illinois Press.
    In "Nietzsche's Perspectivism", Steven Hales and Rex Welshon offer an analytic approach to Nietzsche's important idea that truth is perspectival. Drawing on Nietzsche's entire published corpus, along with manuscripts he never saw to press, they assess the different perspectivisms at work in Nietzsche's views with regard to truth, logic, causality, knowledge, consciousness, and the self. They also examine Nietzsche's perspectivist ontology of power and the attendant claims that substances and subjects are illusory while forces and alliances of power constitute the (...)
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  39. Sloughing One’s Skin.Brian Bowles - 1999 - Southwest Philosophy Review 15 (2):25-38.
    Nietzsche's perspectivism can be seen as a two-leveled cure for dogmatism. On the one hand, perspectivism amounts to the dismissal of the metaphysical world and the acknowledgement of the esential incompleteness of all knowledge insofar as knowledge is only and always perspectival. On the other hand, perspectivism is an affirmation of the central role the affects play in all interpretations of the world; consequently, it presents itself as a summary rejection of the notion of disinterested contemplation or knowledge. Nietzsche's theory (...)
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  40. Nietzsche, Perspectivism, and Mental Health.Steven D. Hales & Rex Welshon - 1999 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, Psychology 6 (3):173-177.
    This paper is a response to Ronald Lehrer's "Perspectivism and Psychodynamic Psychotherapy". Lehrer treats Nietzsche as promoting only a modest perspectivism according to which different cognitive strategies triangulate the truth. We argue that Nietzsche's perspectivism is much more radical, and defensible, than Lehrer admits. We also suggest that Nietzsche's bundle theory of the self has important implications for psychotherapy and the concept of mental health. According to this theory, the self is an aggregate of ever-changing drives and affects. The conditions (...)
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  41. Truth and Objectivity in Perspectivism.R. Lanier Anderson - 1998 - Synthese 115 (1):1-32.
    I investigate the consequences of Nietzsche's perspectivism for notions of truth and objectivity, and show how the metaphor of visual perspective motivates an epistemology that avoids self-referential difficulties. Perspectivism's claim that every view is only one view, applied to itself, is often supposed to preclude the perspectivist's ability to offer reasons for her epistemology. Nietzsche's arguments for perspectivism depend on “internal reasons”, which have force not only in their own perspective, but also within the standards of alternative perspectives. Internal reasons (...)
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  42. Knowledge as Masculine Heroism or Embodied Perception: Knowledge, Will, and Desire in Nietzsche.Cynthia Kaufman - 1998 - Hypatia 13 (4):63 - 87.
    Two distinct doctrines of the will operate in Nietzsche. On one, each person has a will that grows out of their engagement with life. This view can be the basis for a feminist epistemology. On the other, the will must be stimulated through the creation of unattainable goals and games of seduction. This view of the will is misogynist, as it posits a self that must constitute for itself a dominated and silenced other.
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  43. Skepticism, Belief, and the Modern: Maimonides to Nietzsche.Aryeh Botwinick - 1997 - Cornell University Press.
  44. The "Subject" of Nietzsche's Perspectivism.Christoph Cox - 1997 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 35 (2):269-291.
    The "Subject" of Nietzsche's Perspectivism CHRISTOPH COX FORMERLY TAKEN TO ENDORSE a profound skepticism and relativism, Nietz- sche's "doctrine of perspectivism" recently has been seen to fit within tradi- tional conceptions of epistemology and ontology? In the most recent and influential study of the matter, Maudemarie Clark maintains that, properly understood, perspectivism is "an obvious and nonproblematic doctrine. ''~ In a similar vein, Brian Leiter has recently argued that "perspectivism turns out to be much less radical than is usually supposed," (...)
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  45. Nietzsche’s Perspectivist Ontology.Robert C. Welshon - 1996 - International Studies in Philosophy 28 (3):77-98.
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  46. Truth, Paradox, and Nietzschean Perspectivism.Steven D. Hales & Robert C. Welshon - 1994 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 11 (1):101 - 119.
    We argue that Nietzsche's interest in truth is more than merely a critical one. He criticizes one historically prominent conception of truth while proposing his own theory, called "perspectivism". However, Nietzsche's truth perspectivism appears to face a self-referential paradox, which is explored in detail. We argue that no commentator has yet solved this puzzle, and then provide our own solution. This solution, which depends upon distinguishing between weak and strong perspectivism while promoting the former, supplies Nietzsche with a consistent truth (...)
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  47. Nietzsche on Truth and Philosophy.Robert C. Welshon - 1994 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 54 (1):229-233.
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  48. Nietzsche on Truth and Philosophy.John T. Wilcox - 1994 - International Studies in Philosophy 26 (1):103-104.
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  49. Clark, Maudemarie, "Nietzche on Truth and Philosophy". [REVIEW]Panos D. Alexakos - 1993 - International Philosophical Quarterly 33:127-128.
  50. Nietzsche on Truth and Philosophy, by Maudemarie Clark. [REVIEW]Wayne Klein - 1993 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 16 (1):259-275.
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