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  1. Nietzsche's Life Sentence.David B. Allison - 2007 - New Nietzsche Studies 7 (3-4):141-150.
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  2. Nietzsche and Asian Thought.Thomas J. J. Altizer - 1994 - International Studies in Philosophy 26 (1):130-131.
  3. Nietzsche's Thirst For India.S. M. Amadae - 2004 - Idealistic Studies 34 (3):239-262.
    This essay represents a novel contribution to Nietzschean studies by combining an assessment of Friedrich Nietzsche’s challenging uses of “truth” and the “eternal return” with his insights drawn from Indian philosophies. Specifically, drawing on Martin Heidegger’s Nietzsche, I argue that Nietzsche’s critique of a static philosophy of being underpinning conceptual truth is best understood in line with the Theravada Buddhist critique of “self ” and “ego” as transitory. In conclusion, I find that Nietzsche’s “eternal return” can be understood as a (...)
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  4. The Eternal Return of the Overhuman: The Weightiest Knowledge and the Abyss of Light.Ansell-Pearson Keith - 2005 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 30 (1):1-21.
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  5. Nietzsehe's Philosophy of the Etemal Recurrence of the Same.Charles Bambach - 2003 - New Nietzsche Studies 5 (3/4/1/2):208-213.
  6. The Three Stigmata of Friedrich Nietzsche: Political Physiology in the Age of Nihilism.Nandita Biswas Mellamphy - 2011 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
  7. Different Kinds of Ecstasy: Review of Three Recent Works on ‚Eternal Recurrence'. [REVIEW]Peter Bornedal - 2006 - Nietzsche-Studien 35 (1):343-356.
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  8. Eternal Recurrence in Inner-Mental-Life.Peter Bornedal - 2006 - Nietzsche-Studien 35 (1):104-165.
    The essay introduces an interpretation of Nietzsche's Eternal-Recurrence-Thought distinct from traditional 'cosmological' as well as 'ethical' interpretations. The interpretation suggests that eternal recurrence is a conceptualization of intellectual and volitional processes. External recurrence is understood as a concept articulating peculiarities about mental processes related to knowledge and pleasure.Der Aufsatz stellt ein Interpretation von Nietzsches Gedanken der Ewigen Wiederkunft vor, die weder 'kosmologisch' noch 'ethisch' sein möchte. Diese Interpretation hält die Ewige Wiederkunft für eine Konzeptualisierung von Verstandes- und Willensakten. Der Begriff (...)
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  9. Nietzsche's Eternal Return of the Same.Philippe Gagnon - 2011 - Twin Cities Review of Political Philosophy 1:25-26.
    In this shorter piece, at the instigation of a former philosophy student, I accepted to contribute alongside two other writers to the "Expert Help" rubric, and attempted to explain the genesis in Nietzsche's mind of the conception of the eternal recurrence. I lay stress on both the internal contradiction that the solitary of Sils-Maria was trying to resolve and the secret desire that this cherished and embraced rather than demonstrated theory be true in the face of conflicting evidence, and I (...)
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  10. Nietzsche.Martin Heidegger - 1961 - Harpersanfrancisco.
    A landmark discussion between two great thinkers, vital to an understanding of twentieth-century philosophy and intellectual history.
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  11. Eternal Recurrence and Nihilism: Adding Weight to the Unbearable Lightness of Action.Nadeem J. Z. Hussain - manuscript
    (Version 2.4) I have argued elsewhere for ascribing an error theory about all normative and evaluative judgements to Nietzsche. Such a nihilism brings with it a puzzle: how could we—or at least the select few of us being addressed by Nietzsche—continue in the face of this nihilism? This is a philosophical puzzle and so, defeasibly, an interpretive puzzle. If there is no theory it would make sense for Nietzsche to have about how the select few could go on, then this (...)
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  12. The Cosmological Aesthetic Worldview in Van Gogh’s Late Landscape Paintings.Erman Kaplama - 2016 - Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 12 (1):218-237.
    Some artworks are called sublime because of their capacity to move human imagination in a different way than the experience of beauty. The following discussion explores how Van Gogh’s The Starry Night along with some of his other late landscape paintings accomplish this peculiar movement of imagination thus qualifying as sublime artworks. These artworks constitute examples of the higher aesthetic principles and must be judged according to the cosmological-aesthetic criteria for they manage to generate a transition between ethos and phusis (...)
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  13. Cosmological Aesthetics Through the Kantian Sublime and Nietzschean Dionysian.Erman Kaplama - 2013 - UPA, Rowman & Littlefield.
    This book is founded on a close reading of Kant’s Opus Postumum in order both to explore the essential motivation that drove Kant to write a last comprehensive magnum opus and, by doing so, to show the essential link between his aesthetics and the idea of Übergang, the title of this last work. For this work contains not only his dynamical theory of matter defining motion as preliminary to the notions of space and time, and the advanced version of his (...)
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  14. Introduction to Cosmological Aesthetics: The Kantian Sublime and Nietzschean Dionysian.Erman Kaplama - 2010 - International Journal of the Humanities 8 (2):69-84.
    This paper is founded on a close reading of Kant’s Opus Postumum in order both to explore the essential motivation that drove Kant to write a last comprehensive magnum opus and, by doing so, to show the essential link between his aesthetics and the idea of Übergang, the title of this last work. For this work contains not only his dynamical theory of matter defining motion as preliminary to the notions of space and time, and the advanced version of his (...)
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  15. The Eternal Recurrence of the Same as the Gift of Difference: Naming the Enigma, the Enigma of Names.John Krummel - 1996 - PoMo Magazine 2 (1):31-46.
    Published in PoMo Magazine vol. 2, nr. 1 (Spring/Summer 1996) during my years as a grad student at the New School. I examine Nietzsche's presentation of the eternal recurrence, and discuss its interpretations by Heidegger, Bataille, Derrida, Klossowski, Stambaugh, and Vattimo. I will be returning to Nietzsche in the future.
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  16. Uma Perspectiva Ética do Eterno Retorno.Diego Ramos Mileli - 2015 - Revista Filosofia Capital 10 (17):96-102.
    O problema do eterno retorno, conforme este é construído no aforismo 341 da Gaia Ciência, é analisado em sua possibilidade de se construir uma perspectiva ética. Além disso, são abordadas as relações que se estabelecem entre essas expressões 'cuidado de si' e 'eterno retorno', respectivamente em Foucault e Nietzsche, de forma a compreender como as noções que residem nelas se aproximam, afastam ou complementam-se.
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  17. Nietzsche und Heidegger als nihilistische Denker.Wolfgang Müller-Lauter - 1998 - Nietzsche-Studien 27 (1):52-81.
  18. Das willenswesen und der übermensch ein beitrag zu heideggers Nietzsche-interpretationen.Wolfgang Müller-Lauter - 1981 - Nietzsche-Studien 10 (1):132.
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  19. The Eternal Return of the Same: Nietzsche's "Valueless" Revaluation of All Values.David Rowe - 2012 - Parrhesia 15:71-86.
    In this paper I argue that Nietzsche should be understood as a “thorough-going nihilist”. Rather than broaching two general projects of destroying current values and constructing new ones, I argue that Nietzsche should be understood only as a destroyer of values. I do this by looking at Nietzsche’s views on nihilism and the role played by Nietzsche’s cyclical view of time, or his doctrine of the eternal recurrence of the same. I provide a typology of nihilisms, as they are found (...)
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  20. Metaphysics Without Truth: On the Importance of Consistency Within Nietzsche's Philosophy.Stefan Lorenz Sorgner - 2007 - Marquette University Press.
  21. Heidegger's Nietzsche, the Doctrine of Eternal Return, and the Phenomenology of Human Finitude.Robert D. Stolorow - 2010 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 41 (1):106-114.
    Nietzsche’s doctrine of the eternal return of the same, seen through the lens of Heidegger’s interpretation, captures the groundlessness of existence in a technological world devoid of normative significance. The author contends that the temporality depicted poetically in the thought of eternal return is the traumatic temporality of human finitude, to which Nietzsche was exposed at the age of 4 when the death of his father shattered his world. Nietzsche’s metaphysical position is seen as a metaphorical window into the phenomenology (...)
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  22. The Tragic and the Metaphysical in Philosophy and Psychoanalysis.Robert D. Stolorow & George E. Atwood - 2013 - The Psychoanalytic Review 100 (3):405-421.
    This article elaborates a claim, first introduced by Wilhelm Dilthey, that metaphysics represents an illusory flight from the tragedy of human finitude. Metaphysics, of which psychoanalytic metapsychologies are a form, transforms the unbearable fragility and transience of all things human into an enduring, permanent, changeless reality, an illusory world of eternal truths. Three “clinical cases” illustrate this thesis in the work and lives of a philosopher and two psychoanalytic theorists: Friedrich Nietzsche and his metaphysical doctrine of the eternal return of (...)
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  23. Life, Death, and Eternal Recurrence in Nietzsche's Zarathustra.Gabriel Zamosc - 2015 - The Agonist 8 (1&2).
    -/- This paper offers a preliminary interpretation of Nietzsche’s doctrine of Eternal Recurrence, according to which the doctrine constitutes a parable that, speaking of what is permanent in life, praises and justifies all that is impermanent. What is permanent, what always recurs, is the will to power or to self-overcoming that is the fundamental engine of all life. The operating mechanism of such a will consists in prompting the living to undergo transformations or transitory deaths, after which this fundamental engine (...)
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  24. Nietzsche and Eternal Recurrence.Arnold Zuboff - 1980 - In Robert C. Solomon (ed.), Nietzsche: A Collection of Critical Essays. pp. 343-357.
    I critically examine Nietzsche’s argument in The Will to Power that all the detailed events of the world are repeating infinite times (on account of the merely finite possible arrangements of forces that constitute the world and the inevitability with which any arrangement of force must bring about its successors). Nietzsche celebrated this recurrence because of the power of belief in it to bring about a revaluation of values focused wholly on the value of one’s endlessly repeating life. Belief in (...)
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