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  1. Review of Thomas Stern (Ed.), The New Cambridge Companion to Nietzsche, Cambridge. [REVIEW]Jonathan Mitchell - forthcoming - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.
  2. Introduction: Nietzsche's Life and Works.Tom Stern - 2019 - In The New Cambridge Companion to Nietzsche. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 1-21.
  3. Nietzsche, le sujet, la subjectivation. Une lecture d'Ecce Homo.François Kammerer - 2009 - Paris, France: L'Harmattan.
    Nietzsche est souvent perçu comme un philosophe de la critique du " moi ", qui entreprend d'évacuer le sujet souverain pour en faire un simple effet des rapports entre les volontés de puissance. L'ambition de ce livre est de montrer qu'une telle vision est incomplète. Il y a dans l'œuvre de Nietzsche, et particulièrement dans son dernier livre, Ecce Homo, une forte pensée de l'individu et du rapport à soi qui, loin d'éliminer le problème de la subjectivité, le pose à (...)
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  4. Not Another Image of Torment: Nietzsche, Eternal Recurrence, and Theatricality.Jeremy Killian - 2019 - In Brian Pines & Douglas Burnham (eds.), Understanding Nietzsche, Understanding Modernism. London, UK: pp. 135-147.
    Nietzsche’s early philosophy is marked by the sentiment that “only as an aesthetic phenomenon is existence and the world eternally justified (BT §5),” however, in aphorism 313 of The Gay Science, Nietzsche writes: No image of torment: I want to follow Raphael’s example and never paint another image of torment. There are enough sublime things; one does not have to seek out sublimity where it lives in sisterhood with cruelty; anyway, my ambition would find no satisfaction if I wanted to (...)
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  5. Nietzsche's Subversive Rewritings of Phaedo-Platonism.Mark Anderson - 2017 - In Mark T. Conard (ed.), Nietzsche and the Philosophers. London, UK: Routledge. pp. 63-85.
  6. Nietzsche on Mirth and Morality.Trip Glazer - 2017 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 34 (1):79-97.
    Beginning in The Gay Science, Nietzsche repeatedly exhorts his readers to laugh. But why? I argue that Nietzsche wants us to laugh because the emotion that laughter expresses, mirth, plays an important psychological-cum-epistemological role in his attack on traditional morality. I contend that Nietzsche views mirth as an attitude that is uniquely suited to rooting out beliefs that have covertly infiltrated our psychologies. And given that Nietzsche considers morality to be insidious, or to maintain its hold over us even after (...)
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  7. On Nietzsche’s Criticism Towards Common Sense Realism in Human, All Too Human I, 11.Pietro Gori - 2017 - Philosophical Readings 9 (3):207-213.
    The paper explores Nietzsche's observations on language in Human, All Too Human I, 11; reflects on the anti-realist position that Nietzsche defends in that aphorism; and focuses on the role she plays in his later investigation on Western culture and its anthropology. As will be argued, Nietzsche's criticism towards common sense realism is consistent with some pragmatist epistemologies developed during the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth century. This treat of " timeliness " does not limit Nietzsche's originality on the topic. In fact, (...)
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  8. Nietzschean Approaches to Hermeneutics.Paul Katsafanas - forthcoming - In Michael Förster & Kristin Gjesdal (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Hermeneutics. Cambridge University Press.
    This essay charts several key points of contact between Nietzsche and the hermeneutical tradition. It begins by arguing that the familiar claim that Nietzsche offers a hermeneutics of suspicion is potentially misleading. Seeking a more accurate representation of Nietzsche’s views, the essay argues that Nietzsche’s interpretive stance has several key features: he rejects immediate givens, endorses holism and perspectivism, and sees conscious experience as structured by concepts and language. Methodologically, Nietzsche inaugurates a genealogical approach to studying objects of philosophical concern, (...)
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  9. John T. Wilcox, "Truth and Value in Nietzsche: A Study of His Metaethics and Epistemology". [REVIEW]Richard Schacht - 1976 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 14 (4):490.
  10. Nietzsche Und Die Wahrheitsgewissheitsverluste Im Anbruch der Moderne.Gregor Schiemann - 2014 - In H. Heit & L. Heller (eds.), Handbuch. Nietzsche und die Wissenschaften. de Gruyter. pp. 46-75.
    Im ersten Teil verorte ich den historischen Kontext des Umbruchprozesses der Wissenschaft des 19. Jahrhunderts im Hinblick auf die Physik. Vom Beginn der Neuzeit bis weit ins 20. Jahrhundert hinein war die Physik die Leitwissenschaft in den Naturwissenschaften. Der Wandlungsprozess der auf sie bezogenen Wissenschaftsauffassungen setzt im 19. Jahrhundert bislang unangetastete, von der Antike herrührende Geltungsansprüche außer Kraft. Im zweiten Teil vergleiche ich Nietzsches Charakterisierung der Wissenschaften exemplarisch mit der von Hermann von Helmholtz. Helmholtz kann als ein herausragender Vertreter der (...)
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  11. Dialettica, Storia E Conflitto: Il Proprio Tempo Appreso Nel Pensiero: Festschrift in Onore di Domenico Losurdo: Vii Congresso Internazionale, Urbino, Palazzo Albani, 18-20 Novembre 2011. [REVIEW]Stefano G. Azzarà, Paolo Ercolani, Emanuela Susca & Domenico Losurdo (eds.) - 2011 - La Scuola di Pitagora.
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  12. What Is To Be Overcome? Nietzsche, Carnap, and Modernism as the Overcoming of Metaphysic.Carl B. Sachs - 2011 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 28 (3):303-318..
    I examine why Carnap ended his "The Overcoming of Metaphysics" with admiration for Nietzsche, and contextualize his admiration for Nietzsche within their shared commitment to 'modernism.' I show that Carnap's modernism helps explain his enthusiasm for symbolic logic and his attitude towards metaphysics.
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  13. The Dialectic of Perspectivism, II.James Conant - 2006 - SATS 7 (1):6-57.
    As we have seen, the crucial step in Nietzsche’s argument for his early doctrine is summed by in the following remark: ‘If we are forced to comprehend all things only under these forms, then it ceases to be amazing that in all things we actually comprehend nothing but these forms’ (1979, pp. 87–8). Before eventually learning to be suspicious of it, Nietzsche spends a good deal of time wondering instead what it would mean to live with the conclusion that (what (...)
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Nietzsche: Metaphysics
  1. Metafizyka ustanawiania w perspektywie wybranych wątków filozofii F. Nietzschego.Ada Gał - 2019 - Dissertation,
    The main goal of my master thesis is to present a way of grounding of being, alternative to the methods of traditional metaphysics. In this picture the ground for being is a process of constituting of what there is by a specifically understood subject, namely center of force (Kraftzentrum). Human being who is a center of force not only imposes form onto beings but in addition to that he creates them in all dimensions. This way of grounding is untypical, yet (...)
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  2. Précis of Nietzsche’s Constructivism: A Metaphysics of Material Objects (Routledge, 2017).Justin Remhof - forthcoming - Philosophia.
    This is a précis of Nietzsche’s Constructivism: A Metaphysics of Material Objects (Routledge, 2017), for a forthcoming symposium on the book.
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  3. Antichrist Psychonaut: Nietzsche's Psychoactive Drugs.Peter Sjöstedt-H. - 2015 - Psychedelic Press Journal 12:19-41.
    An exploration into the reciprocity between Nietzsche's drug use and his philosophy.
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  4. Paradox and Tragedy in Human Morality.Pouwel Slurink - 1994 - International Political Science Review 15 (347):378.
    An evolutionary approach to ethics supports, to some extent, the sceptical meta-ethics found by some of the Greek sophists and Nietzsche. On the other hand, a modern naturalistic account on the origin and nature of morality, leads to somewhat different conclusions. This is demonstrated with an answer to three philosophical questions: does real freedom exist?, does the good, or real virtue, exist?, does life have a meaning?
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  5. Nietzsche’s Masks.Harold Alderman - 1972 - International Philosophical Quarterly 12 (3):365-388.
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  6. The New Nietzsche: Contemporary Styles of Interpretation.David B. Allison (ed.) - 1977 - MIT Press.
    The fifteen essays, written by such eminent scholars as Derrida, Heidegger, Deleuze, Klossowski, and Blanchot, focus on the Nietzschean concepts of the Will to ...
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Nietzsche: Will to Power
  1. The Will to Power as Parallel Distributed Processing.Eric Steinhart - 1999 - In Babette Babich & Richard Cohen (eds.), Nietzsche's Epistemological Writings. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic. pp. 313-322.
    The will to power has non-trivial physical models taken from the class of parallel dis¬tributed processing systems, specifically wave-mechanical discrete dynamical systems with cyclical entropy. The will to power is thus linked to research in non-linear self-organizing dynami¬cal systems, includ¬ing oscillons, cellular automata, spin-glasses, Ising systems, and connectionist networks.
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  2. Nietzsche Contra Sublimation.Eli I. Lichtenstein - forthcoming - Journal of the History of Philosophy.
    Many commentators have claimed that Nietzsche views the “sublimation” (Sublimierung) of drives as a positive achievement. Against this tradition, I argue that, on the dominant if not universal Nietzschean use of Sublimierung and its cognates, sublimation is just a broad psychological analogue of the traditional (al)chemical process: the “vaporization” of drives into a finer or lighter state, figuratively if not literally. This can yield ennobling elevation, or purity in a positive sense—the intensified “sublimate” of an unrefined original sample. But it (...)
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  3. The Value of Critical Knowledge, Ethics and Education: Philosophical History Bringing Epistemic and Critical Values to Values.Ignace Haaz - 2019 - Geneva, Switzerland: Globethics Publications.
    This book aims at six important conceptual tools developed by philosophers. The author develops each particular view in a chapter, hoping to constitute at the end a concise, interesting and easily readable whole. These concepts are: 1. Ethics and realism: elucidation of the distinction between understanding and explanation – the lighthouse type of normativity. 2. Leadership, antirealism and moral psychology – the lightning rod type of normativity. 3. Bright light on self-identity and positive reciprocity – the reciprocity type of normativity. (...)
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  4. The Passions and Disinterest: From Kantian Free Play to Creative Determination by Power, Via Schiller and Nietzsche.Eli I. Lichtenstein - 2019 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 6:249-279.
    I argue that Nietzsche’s criticism of the Kantian theory of disinterested pleasure in beauty reflects his own commitment to claims that closely resemble certain Kantian aesthetic principles, specifically as reinterpreted by Schiller. I show that Schiller takes the experience of beauty to be disinterested both (1) insofar as it involves impassioned ‘play’ rather than desire-driven ‘work’, and (2) insofar as it involves rational-sensuous (‘aesthetic’) play rather than mere physical play. In figures like Nietzsche, Schiller’s generic notion of play—which is itself (...)
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  5. Psychologischer Skeptizismus. Nietzsches Kritik Am Deutschen Idealismus.Michael Lewin - 2017 - Coincidentia. Zeitschrift für Europäische Geistesgeschichte 8:383-406.
    Eine Untersuchung zu Nietzsches Kritik am Deutschen Idealismus im Rahmen seiner allgemeinen Idealismuskritik und seiner Lehre vom Willen zur Macht.
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  6. Review of Tsarina Doyle, Nietzsche's Metaphysics of the Will to Power: The Possibility of Value. [REVIEW]Justin Remhof - 2018 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 5.
    Review of Tsarnia Doyle, Nietzsche's Metaphysics of the Will to Power: The Possibility of Value.
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  7. Defending Nietzsche's Constructivism About Objects.Justin Remhof - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (2):1132-1158.
    Nietzsche appears to adopt a radical Kantian view of objects called constructivism, which holds that the existence of all objects depends essentially on our practices. This essay provides a new reconstruction of Nietzsche's argument for constructivism and responds to five pressing objections to reading Nietzsche as a constructivist that have not been addressed by commentators defending constructivist interpretations of Nietzsche.
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  8. Feeling, Not Freedom: Nietzsche Against Agency.Donovan Miyasaki - 2016 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 47 (2):256-274.
    Despite his rejection of the metaphysical conception of freedom of the will, Nietzsche frequently makes positive use of the language of freedom, autonomy, self-mastery, self-overcoming, and creativity when describing his normative project of enhancing humanity through the promotion of its highest types. A number of interpreters have been misled by such language to conclude that Nietzsche accepts some version of compatibilism, holding a theory of natural causality that excludes metaphysical or “libertarian” freedom of the will, while endorsing morally substantial alternative (...)
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  9. Introduction to Cosmological Aesthetics: The Kantian Sublime and Nietzschean Dionysian.Erman Kaplama - 2010 - International Journal of the Humanities 8 (2):69-84.
    This paper is founded on a close reading of Kant’s Opus Postumum in order both to explore the essential motivation that drove Kant to write a last comprehensive magnum opus and, by doing so, to show the essential link between his aesthetics and the idea of Übergang, the title of this last work. For this work contains not only his dynamical theory of matter defining motion as preliminary to the notions of space and time, and the advanced version of his (...)
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  10. Nietzsche on Objects.Justin Remhof - 2015 - Nietzsche-Studien 44 (1).
    Nietzsche was persistently concerned with what an object is and how different views of objects lead to different views of facts, causality, personhood, substance, truth, mathematics and logic, and even nihilism. Yet his treatment of objects is incredibly puzzling. In many passages he assumes that objects such as trees and leaves, tables and chairs, and dogs and cats are just ordinary entities of experience. In other places he reports that objects do not exist. Elsewhere he claims that objects exist, but (...)
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  11. Nietzsche and Eternal Recurrence.Arnold Zuboff - 1973 - In Robert C. Solomon (ed.), Nietzsche: A Collection of Critical Essays. pp. 343-357.
    I critically examine Nietzsche’s argument in The Will to Power that all the detailed events of the world are repeating infinite times (on account of the merely finite possible arrangements of forces that constitute the world and the inevitability with which any arrangement of force must bring about its successors). Nietzsche celebrated this recurrence because of the power of belief in it to bring about a revaluation of values focused wholly on the value of one’s endlessly repeating life. Belief in (...)
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  12. Moritz Schlicks Vorlesungen über Nietzsche und Schopenhauer. [REVIEW]Thomas Mormann - 2015 - Journal of General Philosophy of Science 46 (2): 419 - 423.
  13. Originary Dehiscence: An Invitation to Explore the Resonances Between the Philosophies of Nietzsche and Merleau-Ponty.Frank Chouraqui - 2013 - In Christine Daigle & Élodie Boublil (eds.), Nietzsche and Phenomenology: Power, Life, Subjectivity. Indiana University Press. pp. 177-194.
    This paper seeks to provide a basis for a fruitful correspondence between the projects of Nietzsche and Merleau-Ponty. It argues that both philosophers are committed to an ontology of relation and they both regards any terms to these relations as being hypostases of a horizontal movement. This commits them to very parallel views of history, politics, and perception.
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  14. Das willenswesen und der übermensch ein beitrag zu heideggers Nietzsche-interpretationen.Wolfgang Müller-Lauter - 1981 - Nietzsche-Studien 10 (1):132.
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  15. Nietzsches lehre vom willen zur macht.Wolfgang Müller-Lauter - 1974 - Nietzsche-Studien 3 (1):1.
  16. Nietzsche and Antiquity: His Reaction and Response to the Classical Tradition Ed. By Paul Bishop (Review).Charles Bambach - 2013 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 44 (1):113-115.
    The hermeneutic thicket surrounding the question of Nietzsche and the Greeks is both dense and forbidding. Every attempt to pose this question confronts a wide range of difficult issues. Who is “Nietzsche”? Which “Greeks”? What range of concerns? methods? disciplinary boundaries? How to think the relation between the early Nietzsche of the Basel years and the later Nietzsche post-Zarathustra? Where to turn for help in working through the palimpsest of interpretations that have formed the Nietzschebild in our time? To simply (...)
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  17. The Eternal Return of the Same: Nietzsche's "Valueless" Revaluation of All Values.David Rowe - 2012 - Parrhesia 15:71-86.
    In this paper I argue that Nietzsche should be understood as a “thorough-going nihilist”. Rather than broaching two general projects of destroying current values and constructing new ones, I argue that Nietzsche should be understood only as a destroyer of values. I do this by looking at Nietzsche’s views on nihilism and the role played by Nietzsche’s cyclical view of time, or his doctrine of the eternal recurrence of the same. I provide a typology of nihilisms, as they are found (...)
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  18. Salvation in a Naturalized World: The Role of the Will and Intellect in the Philosophies of Nietzsche and Spinoza.Tammy Nyden - 1998 - NASS (North American Spinoza Society) Monograph 7:17-31.
  19. The Will to Power in Science and Philosophy.R. Lanier Anderson - 2012 - In Helmut Heit, Günter Abel & Marco Brusotti (eds.), Nietzsches Wissenschaftsphilosophie. de Gruyter.
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  20. The Hopelessness of Hedonism and the Will to Power.Ivan Soll - 1986 - International Studies in Philosophy 18 (2):97-112.
  21. Nietzsche: His Philosophy of Contradictions and the Contradictions of His Philosophy (Review).Tom Bailey - 2003 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 25 (1):95-100.
  22. Nietzsche on Reality as Will to Power: Toward an "Organization–Struggle" Model.Ciano Aydin - 2007 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 33 (1):25-48.
  23. Nietzsehe’s Philosophy of the Etemal Recurrence of the Same.Charles Bambach - 2003 - New Nietzsche Studies 5 (3/4/1/2):208-213.
  24. Nietzsche.Martin Heidegger - 1961 - Harpersanfrancisco.
    A landmark discussion between two great thinkers, vital to an understanding of twentieth-century philosophy and intellectual history.
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  25. Metaphysics Without Truth: On the Importance of Consistency Within Nietzsche's Philosophy.Stefan Lorenz Sorgner - 2007 - Marquette University Press.
Nietzsche: Eternal Recurrence
  1. Nietzsche's Eternal Return and Guimarães Rosa's Tale 'The Third Riverbank' **.Marcos Wagner Da Cunha - manuscript
    Nietzsche's Ewige Wiederkunft; (Eternal Return), as a possible interpretation of 'The Third River Bank';, a poignant tale by the great Brazilian writer João Guimarães Rosa [1908-1967]. As such, this paper is a part of 'Genealogy of the Real. Nietzsche, Freud'; a Doctorate Dissertation at the Institute of Philosophy of the University of São Paulo (1993).
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  2. Existence Is Evidence of Immortality.Michael Huemer - manuscript
    Time may be infinite in both directions. If it is, then, if persons could live at most once in all of time, the probability that you would be alive now would be zero. But if persons can live more than once, the probability that you would be alive now would be nonzero. Since you are alive now, with certainty, either the past is finite, or persons can live more than once.
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  3. Zarathustra Stone: Friedrich Nietzsche in Sils-Maria, August 1881.Mark Anderson - 2016 - Nashville, TN, USA: SPh Press.
    Stylistically fictionalized but true to the salient facts, Zarathustra Stone relates the story of the day Friedrich Nietzsche thought the thought that changed his life, and that would, he believed, alter the course of western intellectual history. The Eternal Recurrence of the Same. Eternal Return. The narrative explains imaginatively the origin of Nietzsche’s idea, not only its philosophical roots, but its biographical, emotional, and psychological sources as well.
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  4. Nietzsche’s Thirst For India: Schopenhauerian, Brahmanist, and Buddhist Accents In Reflections on Truth, the Ascetic Ideal, and the Eternal Return.S. M. Amadae - 2004 - Idealistic Studies 34 (3):239-262.
    This essay represents a novel contribution to Nietzschean studies by combining an assessment of Friedrich Nietzsche’s challenging uses of “truth” and the “eternal return” with his insights drawn from Indian philosophies. Specifically, drawing on Martin Heidegger’s Nietzsche, I argue that Nietzsche’s critique of a static philosophy of being underpinning conceptual truth is best understood in line with the Theravada Buddhist critique of “self ” and “ego” as transitory. In conclusion, I find that Nietzsche’s “eternal return” can be understood as a (...)
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  5. The Eternal Recurrence of the Same as the Gift of Difference: Naming the Enigma, the Enigma of Names.John Krummel - 1996 - PoMo Magazine 2 (1):31-46.
    Published in PoMo Magazine vol. 2, nr. 1 (Spring/Summer 1996) during my years as a grad student at the New School. I examine Nietzsche's presentation of the eternal recurrence, and discuss its interpretations by Heidegger, Bataille, Derrida, Klossowski, Stambaugh, and Vattimo. I will be returning to Nietzsche in the future.
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  6. The Cosmological Aesthetic Worldview in Van Gogh’s Late Landscape Paintings.Erman Kaplama - 2016 - Cosmos and History 12 (1):218-237.
    Some artworks are called sublime because of their capacity to move human imagination in a different way than the experience of beauty. The following discussion explores how Van Gogh’s The Starry Night along with some of his other late landscape paintings accomplish this peculiar movement of imagination thus qualifying as sublime artworks. These artworks constitute examples of the higher aesthetic principles and must be judged according to the cosmological-aesthetic criteria for they manage to generate a transition between ethos and phusis (...)
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