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  1. The Epistemic Function of Contempt and Humor in Nietzsche.Mark Alfano - forthcoming - In Michelle Mason (ed.), The Moral Psychology of Contempt. Rowman & Littlefield.
    Interpreters have noticed that Nietzsche, in addition to sometimes being uproariously funny, reflects more on laughter and having a sense of humor than almost any other philosopher. Several scholars have further noticed that Nietzschean laughter sometimes seems to have an epistemic function. In this chapter, I therefore assume that Nietzsche is a pluralist about the functions of humor and laughter, and seek to establish the uses he finds for them. I offer an interpretation according to which he tactically uses humor (...)
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  2. Nietzsche on the Future of Education.Valerie Allen & Ares Axiotis - 1998 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1998 (111):107-121.
    In the winter of 1872, while still a young professor in Basel, having just published his first book, The Birth of Tragedy, Friedrich Nietzsche delivered a series of lectures entitled “On the Future of Our Educational Institutions.”1 These five lectures were well received at the time. It appears that Nietzsche intended to add two more lectures and to publish the whole series as a book. By the end of the year, however, the title of the series featured only as the (...)
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  3. Beyond Nihilism Nietzsche's Healing and Edifying Philosophy.Nimrod Aloni - 1991
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  4. Nihilism and the Will: A Study of Nietzsche's Moral and Political Philosophy.Keith James Ansell-Pearson - 1987 - Dissertation, University of Sussex (United Kingdom)
    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. ;This thesis examines the contentious question of Nietzsche's politics by situating Nietzsche's political thought in the context of his chief theoretical concerns. Attention is focused on the role the concepts of nihilism and the will play in Nietzsche's moral and political thought. With this theme of "nihilism and the will" as a way of comprehending the meaning and significance of Nietzsche's moral and political thought, the thesis shows how Nietzsche's work can (...)
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  5. The Philosophy of Friedrich Nietzsche as a Foundation for Physical Education.Gary Chester Banks - 1966
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  6. Open Secrets: Literature, Education, and Authority From J-J. Rousseau to J. M. Coetzee.Michael Bell - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    This study reflects on contemporary humanistic pedagogy by exploring the limits of the teachable. Revisiting the Bildungsroman, it studies the pedagogical relationship from the point of view of the mentor rather than of the young hero. Writers examined include Rousseau, Sterne, Goethe, Nietzsche, D. H. Lawrence, F. R. Leavis, and J. M. Coetzee.
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  7. Nietzsche's Critique of the Liberals' Education to Control the Love of Domination.Michael G. Bend - 1991 - Dissertation, University of Delaware
    Some educators affirm the Nietzschean belief that there are no universally valid moral principles. This belief is inconsistent with the fundamental principles of liberalism, which include, prominently, the belief that domination is bad. The educators who affirm moral relativism, however, generally do not acknowledge the antagonism between relativism and liberalism, and some even wrongly suggest that the absence of universal moral standards is the source of the belief in the illegitimacy of domination. In order to make clear the fundamental antagonism (...)
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  8. Education in an Age of Nihilism: Education and Moral Standards.Nigel Blake, Paul Smeyers, Richard Smith & Paul Standish - 2001 - Routledge.
    This book addresses concerns about educational and moral standards in a world increasingly characterised by nihilism. On the one hand there is widespread anxiety that standards are falling; on the other, new machinery of accountability and inspection to show that they are not. The authors in this book state that we cannot avoid nihilism if we are simply _laissez-faire_ about values, neither can we reduce them to standards of performance, nor must we return to traditional values. They state that we (...)
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  9. Laying Down the Law for the Historical Imagination: Kant, Schiller and Nietzsche.Matthew Louis Blanshei - 2000 - Dissertation, University of Massachusetts Amherst
    Is there an epistemological and/or practical basis for an ethic of history at the close of the twentieth century? This dissertation focuses upon selected works within the tradition of Western metaphysics that have allowed such a question to become both recognizable and problematic today. ;The problematic aspects of such a question become readily apparent. For it gives rise to the idea of a world-history---of a teleological historical process---which is all but unanimously considered to be of contemporary relevance only as a (...)
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  10. Cultivating ‘the Capacity for an Unconstrained View’: Nietzsche, Education and Psychotherapy.Onel Brooks - 2008 - Philosophical Practice 3 (2):285-297.
    This paper takes up a theme in Nietzsche’s philosophy and argues that the capacity to take an unconstrained view can be seen to be of great importance in philosophy, and more specifically, in counselling and psychotherapy, and that therefore much thought needs to be given to the cultivation of this capacity in the education of philosophical practitioners. This paper is specifically concerned with the education of psychotherapists and counsellors and how this process can constrain and restrict the practitioner, because it (...)
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  11. Untimely Education: Nietzsche's Early Experiments in Revaluing and Self-Overcoming.Laura Anders Canis - 2000 - Dissertation, The Pennsylvania State University
    A fundamental problem in philosophy involves the question of how to apply the insights of philosophy to culture at large. This dissertation focuses on a pivotal episode in German intellectual and philosophical history, namely the period of transition from a classicist vision to a modernist vision of the aims and needs of culture, which culminated in Germany's victory in the Franco-Prussian War in 1871. Nietzsche problematizes this period of transition in his early work, where he seeks to reconcile philosophy and (...)
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  12. Dreaming of the True Erotic: Nietzsche's Socrates and the Reform of Modern Educatio. Church - 2006 - History of Political Thought 27 (4):685-710.
    Education reform requires in Nietzsche's view a trenchant criticism of contemporary educational institutions. The criticism of the institutions and the suggested path for change demand a comprehensive historical study of the foundations of these educational institutions, a study that points out their failures and the available avenues for change. The historical study leads Nietzsche back to Socrates, who is not only the root of contemporary problems, but also a ripe source for new possibilities for education and culture. Socrates' multifarious character (...)
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  13. Dreaming of the True Erotic: Nietzsche's Socrates and the Reform of Modern Education.Jeffrey Church - 2006 - History of Political Thought 27 (4):687-710.
    Education reform requires in Nietzsche's view a trenchant criticism of contemporary educational institutions. The criticism of the institutions and the suggested path for change demand a comprehensive historical study of the foundations of these educational institutions, a study that points out their failures and the available avenues for change. The historical study leads Nietzsche back to Socrates, who is not only the root of contemporary problems, but also a ripe source for new possibilities for education and culture. Socrates' multifarious character (...)
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  14. Does That Sound Strange to You? : Education and Indirection in Essay III of on the Genealogy of Morality.Daniel Conway - 2009 - In Jeffrey A. Metzger (ed.), Nietzsche, Nihilism, and the Philosophy of the Future. Continuum.
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  15. Nietzsche on History and Historical Education Through Tragic Sense.B. Dimopoulos - 2011 - Filozofia 66:133-140.
    Nietzsche’s definition of history is based on his refusal to conceive it as “pure science”: We can employ history only “for the purpose of life”. This vitalistic perspective led us to initially tackle the nietzschean interpretation of life, which is concerned with a “dark, driving power that insatiably thirsts for itself”, which, in its effort to be redeemed from “the “unconsciousness of instinct”, can be find in a small minority of geniuses, the human types who will ensure the fulfillment of (...)
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  16. Self-Education and University.Aleksandar Dobrijević & Predrag Krstić - 2013 - Synthesis Philosophica 55 (1):83-96.
    In an attempt to articulate the link between the “ideas” of university and self-education, the authors of this paper firstly set forth the classical understanding of education that precedes the conception of self-education. The second part deals with Nietzsche’s rigorous understanding of self-education as the most consequent and most far-reaching intervention in the concept of education so far. The third part is exploring the example of Derrida’s wavering in regard to university activity and efficacity and signals the modern “antinomies” of (...)
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  17. Das Programm ästhetischer Erziehung bei Schiller und beim frühen Nietzsche.Andreas Dorschel - 1992 - Vierteljahrsschrift Für Wissenschaftliche Pädagogik 68 (3):260-284.
    Friedrich Nietzsche, in his early work, both appropriated and transformed Friedrich Schiller’s idea of aesthetic education. Art must cease to be a mere object of private pleasure and turn into a medium of public communication – this is the vision both philosophers share. As Nietzsche assigns the rôle held by language in Schiller to music, he shifts the project’s meaning. Yet both authors have to address the paradox that art, cut off from political and economic structures they disapprove of, is (...)
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  18. Nietzsche, Culture and Education – Edited by Thomas E. Hart.George Duke - 2010 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (8):918-920.
  19. When Teachers Must Let Education Hurt: Rousseau and Nietzsche on Compassion and the Educational Value of Suffering.E. Jonas Mark - 2010 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 44 (1):45-60.
    Avi Mintz has recently argued that Anglo‐American educators have a tendency to alleviate student suffering in the classroom. According to Mintz, this tendency can be detrimental because certain kinds of suffering actually enhance student learning. While Mintz compellingly describes the effects of educator's desires to alleviate suffering in students, he does not examine one of the roots of the desire: the feeling of compassion or pity. Compassion leads many teachers to unreflectively alleviate student struggles. While there are certainly times when (...)
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  20. Bloom and His Critics: Nietzsche, Nihilism, and the Aims of Education.Jon Fennell - 1999 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 18 (6):405-434.
    The central questions raised by Allan Bloom's The Closing of theAmerican Mind are often overlooked. Among the most important ofBloom's themes is the impact of nihilism upon education. Bloom condemnsnihilism. Interestingly, we find among his critics two alternativejudgments. Richard Schacht, citing Nietzsche, asserts that nihilism,while fruitless in and of itself, is a necessary prerequisite tosomething higher. Harry Neumann, affirming the accuracy of nihilism,declares that both Bloom and Nietzsche reject nihilism out of ignoranceborn of weakness. All three philosophers understand that the (...)
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  21. Nietzsche’s Übermensch as a Metaphor for Education.Peter Fitzsimons - 2007 - Paideusis: Journal of the Canadian Philosophy of Education Society 16:5-15.
    Rather than appealing to universal truth or morality based on the power of reason, Nietzsche’s impassioned plea for resuscitating the embodied self as a source of ethics provides a new perspective on educational philosophy. Within the concept of Will to Power, he offers the notion of the Übermensch as a model for overcoming the social limitations of Christian morality and the dictates of fashion. In a formative state, ‘untimely men’ stand outside the homogenising influence of the State. Nietzsche’s Übermensch, involving (...)
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  22. Nietzsche, Ethics and Education: An Account of Difference – By P. Fitzsimons.Gibbons Andrew - 2010 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (1):142-145.
  23. Nietzsche, Ethics and Education: An Account of Difference – by P. Fitzsimons.Andrew Gibbons - 2010 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (1):142-145.
  24. Humanism Betrayed: Theory, Ideology and Culture in the Contemporary University.Graham Good - 2001 - Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    Political correctness in Canada: the McEwen report on the political science department at UBC -- The new sectarianism: gender, race, sexual orientation -- Theory 1: Marx, Freud, Nietzsche -- Theory 2: Constructionism, ideology, textuality -- Presentism: postmodernism, poststructuralism, postcolonialism -- The carceral vision: Geertz, Greenblatt, Foucault, and culture as constraint -- The liberal humanist vision: Northrup Frye and culture as freedom -- Conclusion: the hegemony of theory and the managerial university.
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  25. Between Remembering and Forgetting.Mordechai Gordon - 2015 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 34 (5):489-503.
    This essay seeks to add to a growing body of literature in philosophy of education that focuses on issues of historical consciousness and remembrance and their connections to moral education. In particular, I wish to explore the following questions: What does it mean to maintain a tension between remembering and forgetting tragic historical events? And what does an ethical stance that seeks to maintain this tension provide us? In what follows, I first describe two contemporary approaches to cultivating historical consciousness (...)
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  26. The Perils of Rationality: Nietzsche, Peirce and Education.Gregory Maughn - 2001 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 33 (1):23-34.
  27. The Perils of Rationality: Nietzsche, Peirce and Education.Maughn Gregory - 2001 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 33 (1):23–34.
  28. Nietzsche, Culture, and Education.Thomas Hart (ed.) - 2008 - Ashgate.
    This book brings together a collection of specially commissioned essays on the theme of Nietzsche's cultural critique and its use in and effect on educational ...
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  29. Nietzsche's Tragic Regime Culture, Aesthetics, and Political Education.Thomas W. Heilke - 1998
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  30. Friedrich Nietzsche's Political Education: The Foundations for an Aesthetic State.Thomas Wolfgang Heilke - 1990 - Dissertation, Duke University
    Although it is now generally acknowledged that Friedrich Nietzsche had a theory of politics, the character and content of that theory remain in dispute. This dissertation argues that Nietzsche had a vision of an aesthetic state as the best political regime, and that he developed a new kind of political education to serve as the pedagogical basis for such a regime. It examines Nietzsche's conception of politics from the point of view of his political education and its importance for his (...)
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  31. Heidegger and Nietzsche; the Question of Value and Nihilism in Relation to Education.Ruth Irwin - 2003 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 22 (3/4):227-244.
    This paper is a philosophical analysis ofHeidegger and Nietzsche's approach tometaphysics and the associated problem ofnihilism. Heidegger sums up the history ofWestern metaphysics in a way which challengescommon sense approaches to values education.Through close attention to language, Heideggerargues that Nietzsche inverts thePlatonic-Christian tradition but retains theanthropocentric imposition of ‘values’. Ihave used Nietzsche's theory to suggest aslightly different definition of metaphysicsand nihilism which draws attention to theontological parameters of human truths as astruggle between competing sets of conflictingor contradictory values (perspectives) thatopens (...)
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  32. Overcoming Ressentiment: Nietzsche's Education for an Aesthetic Aristocracy.Mark Jonas - 2013 - History of Political Thought 34 (4):669-701.
    I argue that recent interpretations of Nietzsche's political theory that make him out to be a Machiavellian elitist are misguided. While Nietzsche's philosophy advocates a return to an order of rank among individuals, it does not entail the domination of the few over the many. Rather, it is meant to benefit all individuals, whatever their rank. To this end, I examine several Machiavellian interpretations and demonstrate the inadequacy of their exegetical evidence. I then turn to Nietzsche's educational theory and show (...)
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  33. When Teachers Must Let Education Hurt: Rousseau and Nietzsche on Compassion and the Educational Value of Suffering.Mark Jonas - 2010 - Philosophy of Education 44 (1):45-60.
    Avi Mintz has recently argued that Anglo-American educators have a tendency to alleviate student suffering in the classroom. According to Mintz, this tendency can be detrimental because certain kinds of suffering actually enhance student learning. While Mintz compellingly describes the effects of educator's desires to alleviate suffering in students, he does not examine one of the roots of the desire: the feeling of compassion or pity. Compassion leads many teachers to unreflectively alleviate student struggles. While there are certainly times when (...)
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  34. Gratitude, Ressentiment, and Citizenship Education.Mark E. Jonas - 2012 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 31 (1):29-46.
    Patricia White (Stud Philos Educ 18:43–52, 1999) argues that the virtue gratitude is essential to a flourishing democracy because it helps foster universal and reciprocal amity between citizens. Citizens who participate in this reciprocal relationship ought to be encouraged to recognize that “much that people do does in fact help to make communal civic life less brutish, pleasanter and more flourishing.” This is the case even when the majority of citizens do not intentionally seek to make civic life better for (...)
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  35. When Teachers Must Let Education Hurt: Rousseau and Nietzsche on Compassion and the Educational Value of Suffering.Mark E. Jonas - 2010 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 44 (1):45-60.
    Avi Mintz (2008) has recently argued that Anglo-American educators have a tendency to alleviate student suffering in the classroom. According to Mintz, this tendency can be detrimental because certain kinds of suffering actually enhance student learning. While Mintz compellingly describes the effects of educator's desires to alleviate suffering in students, he does not examine one of the roots of the desire: the feeling of compassion or pity (used as synonyms here). Compassion leads many teachers to unreflectively alleviate student struggles. While (...)
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  36. A (R)Evaluation of Nietzsche's Anti-Democratic Pedagogy: The Overman, Perspectivism, and Self-Overcoming.Mark E. Jonas - 2009 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 28 (2):153-169.
    In this paper, I argue that Friedrich Nietzsche’s concept of self-overcoming has been largely misinterpreted in the philosophy of education journals. The misinterpretation partially stems from a misconstruction of Nietzsche’s perspectivism, and leads to a conception of self-overcoming that is inconsistent with Nietzsche’s educational ideals. To show this, I examine some of the prominent features of the so-called “debate” of the 1980s surrounding Nietzsche’s conception of self-overcoming. I then offer an alternative conception that is more consistent with Nietzsche’s thought, and (...)
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  37. Finding Truth in 'Lies': Nietzsche's Perspectivism and its Relation to Education.Mark E. Jonas & Yoshiaki M. Nakazawa - 2008 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 42 (2):269-285.
    In his 2001 article 'Teaching to Lie and Obey: Nietzsche on Education', Stefan Ramaekers defends Nietzsche's concept of perspectivism against the charge that it is relativistic. He argues that perspectivism is not relativistic because it denies the dichotomy between the 'true' world and the 'seeming' world, a dichotomy central to claims to relativism. While Ramaekers' article is correct in denying relativistic interpretations of perspectivism it does not go far enough in this direction. In fact, the way Ramaekers makes his case (...)
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  38. Finding Truth in ‘Lies’: Nietzsche's Perspectivism and its Relation to Education.Mark Jonas & Yoshiaki Nakazawa - 2008 - Philosophy of Education 42 (2):269-285.
    In his 2001 article ‘Teaching to Lie and Obey: Nietzsche on Education’, Stefan Ramaekers defends Nietzsche's concept of perspectivism against the charge that it is relativistic. He argues that perspectivism is not relativistic because it denies the dichotomy between the ‘true’ world and the ‘seeming’ world, a dichotomy central to claims to relativism. While Ramaekers' article is correct in denying relativistic interpretations of perspectivism it does not go far enough in this direction. In fact, the way Ramaekers makes his case (...)
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  39. Nietzsche’s New Dawn. Educating Students to Strive for Better in a Dynamic Professional World.H. Joosten - 2015 - Dissertation, The Hague University of Applied Sciences
    Professional higher education is expected to educate large numbers of students to become innovative professionals within a time frame of three or four years. A mission impossible? Not necessarily, according to Henriëtta Joosten who is a philosopher as well as a teacher. She uses the experimental, liberating, but also dangerous ideas of Friedrich Nietzsche to rethink contemporary higher professional education. What does it mean to teach students to strive for better in a professional world where horizons tend to disperse and (...)
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  40. Learning and Teaching in Uncertain Times: A Nietzschean Approach in Professional Higher Education.Henriëtta Joosten - 2013 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 47 (4):548-563.
    Today professionals have to deal with more uncertainties in their field than before. We live in complex and rapidly changing environments. The British philosopher Ronald Barnett adds the term ‘supercomplexity’ to highlight the fact that ‘we can no longer be sure how even to describe the world that faces us’ (Barnett, 2004). Uncertainty is, nevertheless, not a highly appreciated notion. An obvious response to uncertainty is to reduce it—or even better, to wipe it away. The assumption of this approach is (...)
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  41. Philosophy, Education, and the Cycle of Enlightenment: Thus Spoke Zarathustra, Thus Listened the Rabbis.Claire Katz - 2007 - New Nietzsche Studies 7 (3/4):75-90.
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  42. Philosophy, Education, and the Cycle of Enlightenment.Claire Katz - 2007 - New Nietzsche Studies 7 (3-4):75-90.
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  43. The Philosopher as Untimely Educator: A Study of the Task of the Philosopher-Educator in Plato and Nietzsche.Utong Kovindha - 1985 - Dissertation, Duquesne University
    To speak of the philosopher as an educator implies that philosophy is a social, pedagogical activity, which must communicate with society. As a pedagogical activity, can philosophy overcome the age-old notion that philosophy is useless, that "we cannot do anything with philosophy?" Considering philosophy as pedagogical activity reverses this notion of philosophy as useless. Perhaps philosophy can, as Heidegger has suggested in his Introduction to Metaphysics, "do something with us." But what is this "doing"? Asking this question prompts us to (...)
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  44. Nihilism: Beyond Optimism and Pessimism.Bert Lambeir & Paul Smeyers - 2003 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 22 (3/4):183-194.
    Is the youth culture, or more precisely aparticular kind of it, to be characterized as nihilistic ? And is this a threat or ablessing for education? To deal with this nihilism is first characterized generally andfollowing particular attention is paid toNietzsche's own version and revaluation ofvalues. Then Foucault's concept of life as awork of art is brought to the forefront as aparticular manner to give shape to one's life.It is argued that some of the more popularforms of pleasure nowadays may (...)
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  45. Kierkegaard and Nietzsche - Educational Meaning of Negativity -.Byung-Duk Lim - 2014 - The Journal of Moral Education 26 (3):95.
  46. The Paradox of Philosophical Education: Nietzsche's New Nobility and the Eternal Recurrence in Beyond Good and Evil.Harvey J. Lomax - 2003 - Lexington Books.
    Lomax pays particular attention to the problematic concept of nobility, which concerned Nietzsche during his later years. This study provides a close textual analysis and a thoughtful reconceptualization ofBeyond Good and Evil.
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  47. Nietzsche, Culture and Education. By Thomas E. Hart, Ed.Ian McPherson - 2011 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 45 (3):569-572.
  48. Nietzsche's Apollonian and Dionysian Consciousness of Community and Classroom Samba.Chrstopher Naughton - 2006 - Action, Criticism and Theory of Music Education 2 (5):1-14.
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  49. Autonomy, Agency and Education: He Tangata, He Tangata, He Tangata.Ruth Irwin Nesta Devine - 2005 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 37 (3):317-331.
    In this paper the authors take up James Marshall's work on the individual and autonomy. Their suggestion is that although the liberal notion of the autonomous individual might give us a standard of reference for the freedom of persons, the liberal tradition also circumscribes that freedom by prescribing it both as an attribute of persons and as a necessity for persons to exercise, in the form of choice, even though the range of choice is in fact limited. Starting from an (...)
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  50. An Educational Interpretation of Nietzsche’s ‘Overman’ and ‘Eternal Recurrence’.Sang-Cheol Park - 2014 - The Journal of Moral Education 26 (2):81.
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