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  1. V. Attack on Neo-Confucianism.Thomas R. H. Havens - 2015 - In Nishi Amane and Modern Japanese Thought. Princeton University Press. pp. 114-140.
  2. VI. Ethics for the New Society.Thomas R. H. Havens - 2015 - In Nishi Amane and Modern Japanese Thought. Princeton University Press. pp. 141-163.
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  3. IV. A Leader in Enlightening Japan.Thomas R. H. Havens - 2015 - In Nishi Amane and Modern Japanese Thought. Princeton University Press. pp. 77-113.
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  4. VII. Nishi on Politics and Current Events.Thomas R. H. Havens - 2015 - In Nishi Amane and Modern Japanese Thought. Princeton University Press. pp. 164-190.
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  5. IX. Nishi and Modern Japan.Thomas R. H. Havens - 2015 - In Nishi Amane and Modern Japanese Thought. Princeton University Press. pp. 217-222.
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  6. II. The Early Development of Nishi's Thought.Thomas R. H. Havens - 2015 - In Nishi Amane and Modern Japanese Thought. Princeton University Press. pp. 20-39.
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  7. I. The Intellectual in Japan's Transition From Feudalism to Modernism.Thomas R. H. Havens - 2015 - In Nishi Amane and Modern Japanese Thought. Princeton University Press. pp. 1-19.
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  8. Japanese Philosophy: A Sourcebook.James W. Heisig, Thomas P. Kasulis & John C. Maraldo - 2011 - University of Hawaiʻi Press.
  9. Nishi Amane No Seiji Shisō: Kiritsu, Kōri, Shin = Nishi, Amane.Hikaru Sugawara - 2009 - Perikansha.
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  10. Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy: Neglected Themes and Hidden Variations.Victor Hori & Melissa Anne-Marie Curley (eds.) - 2008 - Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture.
    The growing scholarship on the Kyoto School of Japanese Buddhist philosophy has brought it to the attention of more and more people in the West, but in the process, the Kyoto School has acquired a fixed identity. It is usually depicted as centered around three main figures—Nishida Kitarō, Tanabe Hajime and Nishitani Keiji—and concerned with the philosophy of nothingness. In fact, however, as the thirteen scholars in this volume show, the Kyoto School included several other members beside the inner circle (...)
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  11. Nihon Tetsugaku No Reimeiki: Nishi Amane No "Hyakuichi Shinron" to Meiji No Tetsugakkai.Genʼyoku Kuwaki - 2008 - Shoshi Shinsui.
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  12. The Meaning of Heaven According to Nishi Amane.Takako Saitō - 2006 - In James W. Heisig (ed.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy Vol.1. Nagoya: Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 1-21.
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  13. Review of Sourcebook for Modern Japanese Philosophy: Selected Documents by David A. Dilworth; Valdo H. Viglielmo; Agustin Jacinto Zavala. [REVIEW]Steven Heine - 2001 - Philosophy East and West 51 (2):311-312.
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  14. Nishi Amane’s Efforts to Translate Western Knowledge: Sound, Written Character, and Meaning.Douglas Howland - 1991 - Semiotica 83 (3-4):283-310.
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  15. Nishi Amane Ni Okeru Tetsugaku No Seiritsu Kindai Nihon Ni Okeru Hotetsugaku Seiritsu No Tame No Echudo.Keisuke Hasunuma - 1987
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  16. Nishi Amane and Modern Japanese Thought.Thomas R. H. Havens - 1970 - Princeton: Princeton University Press.
    A nineteenth-century aristocrat, Nishi Amane (1829-1897) was one of the first Japanese to assert the supremacy of Western culture. He was sent by his government to Leiden to study the European social sciences; on his return to Japan shortly before the climactic Meiji Restoration of 1868 he introduced and adapted European utilitarianism and positivism to his country's intellectual world. To modernize, Nishi held, Japan must cast off the bonds of the Confucian world-view in order to adopt new principles of empirical (...)
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  17. Nishi Amane Zenshu.Amane Nishi & Toshiaki Okubo - 1962 - Munetaka Shobo.
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  18. The Beginnings of Western Philosophy in Japan: Nishi Amane, 1829–1897.Gino K. Piovesana - 1962 - International Philosophical Quarterly 2 (2):295-306.
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  19. Meiji Shisokai No Choryu.Yoshishige Abe - 1932 - Iwanami Shoten.