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  1. The Problem of “Inverse Correspondence” in the Philosophy of Nishida: Toward a Critical Understanding.Masao Abe - 1995 - International Philosophical Quarterly 35 (4):419-436.
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  2. The Problem of “Inverse Correspondence” in the Philosophy of Nishida.Masao Abe - 1995 - International Philosophical Quarterly 35 (4):419-436.
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  3. “Inverse Correspondence” in the Philosophy of Nishida: The Emergence of the Notion.Masao Abe - 1992 - International Philosophical Quarterly 32 (3):325-344.
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  4. Nishida’s Philosophy of “Place”.Masao Abe - 1988 - International Philosophical Quarterly 28 (4):355-371.
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  5. The Problem of ‘‘Inverse Correspondence’’ in the Philosophy of Nishida: Comparing Nishida with Tanabe.Masao Abe & James L. Fredericks - 1999 - International Philosophical Quarterly 39 (1):59-76.
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  6. The Problem of Inverse Correspondence in the Philosophy of Nishida: Comparing Nishida with Tanabe.Masao Abe & James L. Fredericks - 1999 - International Philosophical Quarterly 39 (153):59-76.
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  7. Modern Sports and the Eastern Tradition of Physical Culture: Emphasizing Nishida's Theory of the Body.Shinobu Abe - 1987 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 14 (1):44-47.
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  8. Aristotle and the Epistemology of Nishida Kitarō.Z. Agustin Jacinto - 2009 - In Raquel Bouso & James W. Heisig (eds.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy 6: Confluences and Cross-Currents. Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 80-€“108.
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  9. Zettaimu to Basho Suzuki Zengaku to Nishida Tetsugaku.Ryåomin Akizuki - 1996
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  10. Kitaro Nishida, "Intelligibility and the PHilosophy of Nothingness: Three Philosophical Essays". [REVIEW]Van Meter Ames - 1967 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 5 (4):376.
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  11. Self and Other: A Parallel Between Dōgen and Nishida.Laurentiu Andrei - 2010 - In James W. Heisig & Rein Raud (eds.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy: Japanese Philosophy Abroad. Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 175-189.
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  12. Becoming Bamboo Robert E. Carter Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen's University Press, 1992, Xvi + 224 Pp.The Nothingness Beyond God: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Nishida Kitaro Robert E. Carter New York: Paragon House, 1989, Xxvii + 191 Pp.God, the Self, and Nothingness: Reflections Eastern and Western Robert E. Carter, Ed. New York: Paragon House, 1990, Xxxix + 291 Pp. [REVIEW]Leonard Angel - 1995 - Dialogue 34 (2):409-.
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  13. Nishida Kitarō: Rekishi No Ronrigaku.Daisuke Araya - 2008 - Kōdansha.
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  14. 二人称の死:西田・大拙・西谷の思想をめぐって.Hiroshi Asami - 2003 - Yokohama: Shunpusha.
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  15. Nihongo to Nihon Shisō: Motoori Norinaga, Nishida Kitarō, Mikami Akira, Karatani Kōjin.Makoto Asari - 2008 - Fujiwara Shoten.
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  16. Comparative Dialectics: Nishida Kitarō's Logic of Place and Western Dialectical Thought.G. S. Axtell - 1991 - Philosophy East and West 41 (2):163-184.
    Philosophical anthropologist Mircea Eliade once said that "the union of opposites" is a basic category of archaic ontology and comparative world religions. In this paper I develop the theory of contrariety or opposition as a prime focus for East/West comparative philosophy. The paper considers especially Nishida Kitaro's later works and the complex phrase "zettai mujuntekijikodbitsu," variously translated by Schinzinger as "absolute contradictory self-identity," "the self-identity of absolute contradictories," or more simply as "oneness" or "unity" of opposites.
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  17. From the "Topos of Nothingness" to the "Space of Transparency": Kitarō Nishida's Notion Of.Jin Baek - 2008 - Philosophy East and West 58 (1).
    : In his philosophy of nothingness, Kitar Nishida illuminates the matrix of transformation of the world ‘‘from the Created to the Creating’’ (tsukuru mono kara tsukurareta mono e) through shintai, or the body. In this matrix, shintai enters into the stage of an action-sensation continuum and emerges as the immaculate iconic tool of nothingness to create new figures as extended self. This idea of shintai has resonance with the development of postwar art in Japan. The ‘‘Space of Transparency’’ put forth (...)
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  18. From the "Topos of Nothingness" to the "Space of Transparency": Kitarō Nishida's Notion of Shintai and Its Influence on Art and Architecture.Jin Baek - 2008 - Philosophy East and West 58 (1):83-107.
    In his philosophy of nothingness, Kitar Nishida illuminates the matrix of transformation of the world ''from the Created to the Creating'' through shintai, or the body. In this matrix, shintai enters into the stage of an action-sensation continuum and emerges as the immaculate iconic tool of nothingness to create new figures as extended self. This idea of shintai has resonance with the development of postwar art in Japan. The ''Space of Transparency'' put forth by Ufan Lee, the leader of Monoha, (...)
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  19. From the "Topos of Nothingness" to the "Space of Transparency": Kitarō Nishida's Notion of Shintai and Its Influence on Art and Architecture (Part 1).Jin Baek - 2008 - Philosophy East and West 58 (1):83 - 107.
    In his philosophy of nothingness, Kitarō Nishida illuminates the matrix of transformation of the world "from the Created to the Creating" (tsukuru mono kara tsukurareta mono e) through shintai, or the body. In this matrix, shintai enters into the stage of an action-sensation continuum and emerges as the immaculate iconic tool of nothingness to create new figures as extended self. This idea of shintai has resonance with the development of postwar art in Japan. The "Space of Transparency" put forth by (...)
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  20. Empty Cross: Nothingness and the Church of Light.Jin Baek - 2004 - Dissertation, University of Pennsylvania
    This dissertation contextualizes the emergence of the Church of Light by Tadao Ando within the Japanese religio-philosophical tradition of nothingness. The idea of nothingness was revived during the first half of the twentieth-century by Kitaro Nishida with two cultural ramifications in the post-war period: a series of dialogues on the points of convergence and divergence between nothingness and the God of Christianity, and an architectural art movement called Monoha, or l'Ecole de Choses. Under the concept of "structuring emptiness," Monoha attempted (...)
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  21. Uno studio sul bene - Nishida Kitaro. [REVIEW]Scilla Bellucci - 2008 - Humana Mente 7.
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  22. The Transcendental Path: Abhidharma Sources of Nishida’s Logic of Place.Stevens Bernard - 2009 - In Raquel Bouso & James W. Heisig (eds.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy 6: Confluences and Cross-Currents. Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 55-79.
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  23. Logique du Lieu Et Oeuvre Humaine.Augustin Berque, Philippe Nys & Ecole des Hautes Études En Sciences Sociales - 1997
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  24. From Community to Time-Space Development: Comparing N. S. Trubetzkoy, Nishida Kitar, and Watsuji Tetsur.Thorsten Botz-Bornstein - 2007 - Asian Philosophy 17 (3):263 – 282.
    I introduce and compare Russian and Japanese notions of community and space. Some characteristic strains of thought that exist in both countries had similar points of departure, overcame similar problems and arrived at similar results. In general, in Japan and Russia, the nostalgia for the community has been strong because one felt that in society through modernization something of the particularity of one's culture had been lost. As a consequence, both in Japan and in Russia allusions to the German sociologist (...)
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  25. Place and Dream: Japan and the Virtual.Thorsten Botz-Bornstein (ed.) - 2004 - Rodopi.
    This is a book about space. On a first level, it reflects traditional Japanese ideas of space against various “items” of Western culture. Among these items are Bakhtin's “dialogicity”, Wittgenstein’s Lebensform, and “virtual space” or “globalized” space as representatives of the latest development of an “alienated”, modern spatial experience. Some of the Western concepts of space appear as negative counter examples to“basho-like”, Japanese places; others turn out to be compatible with the Japanese idea of space.On a second level, the book (...)
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  26. Nishida and Wittgenstein: From 'Pure Experience' to Lebensform or New Perspectives for a Philosophy of Intercultural Communication.Thorsten Botz-Bornstein - 2003 - Asian Philosophy 13 (1):53 – 70.
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  27. Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy 6: Confluences and Cross-Currents.James W. Heisig Raquel Bouso & James W. Heisig (eds.) - 2009 - Nagoya: Nanzan.
    The list of publications having to do with Japanese intellectual history in general and Kyoto School philosophy in particular has grown steadily over the past years, both inside and outside of Japan. This is due in no small part to the important contributions made by those whose papers are included in this volume, the proceedings of an international conference held in June 2009 at the Universitat Pompeu Fabra in Barcelona. Although much remains to be done if Japanese philosophy is to (...)
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  28. Place of Nothingness and the Dimension of Visibility : Nishida, Merleau-Ponty, and Huineng.David Brubaker - 2009 - In Jin Y. Park & Gereon Kopf (eds.), Merleau-Ponty and Buddhism. Lexington Books.
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  29. Kitaro Nishida Bibliography.Lydia Brüll - 1988 - International Philosophical Quarterly 28 (4):373-381.
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  30. Kitarō Nishida, An Inquiry Into the Good. [REVIEW]Robert Carter - 1991 - Philosophy in Review 11:280-281.
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  31. Nishida Kitarō: Place and Dialectic: Two Essays by Nishida Kitarō Trans. By John W. M. Krummel and Shigenori Nagatomo. Introduction by John W. M. Krummel. [REVIEW]Robert E. Carter - 2012 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 72 (1):67-70.
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  32. God and Nothingness.Robert E. Carter - 2009 - Philosophy East and West 59 (1):pp. 1-21.
    The idea of nothingness has been viewed as neither a vital nor a positive element in Western philosophy or theology. With the exception of a handful of mystics, nothingness has been taken to refer to the negation of being, or to some theoretical void. By contrast, the Japanese philosopher Nishida Kitarō gave nothingness a central role in philosophy. The strategy of this essay is to use the German mystic Meister Eckhart as a more familiar thinker who did take nothingness seriously, (...)
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  33. Bashô and the Mastery of Poetic Space in Oku No Hosomichi.Steven Carter - 2000 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 120 (2):190-198.
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  34. The Potential and Limits of Nishida Kitarō’s Philosophy.Ching Yuen Cheung - 2009 - In Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy 4: Facing the 21st Century. Nagoya: Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 165-175.
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  35. Nishida Kitarō’s Philosophy of Body.Ching-Yuen Cheung - 2014 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (4):507-523.
    In this paper, I shall discuss Nishida’s 西田 philosophy of body from the aspects of acting intuition, rhythm, and situatedness. Pure experience used to be the starting point of Nishida’s early philosophy. In his later philosophy, however, the keyword in Nishida’s philosophy is no longer “experience” but “acting.” It is neither “I think therefore I am” nor “I will therefore I am,” but “I act therefore I am.” As the organ of acting intuition, body is one of the most important (...)
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  36. Hallucinating the End of History: Nishida, Zen, and the Psychedelic Eschaton.Eric Cunningham - 2007 - Academica Press.
    The problem of Nishida Kitaro's historical philosophy and an introduction to the psychedelic paradigm -- The Zen nexus between Nishida Kitaro and modern psychedelic experience -- Experience and the self: the early phase of Nishida's thought (1911-1931) -- Nishida Kitaro's historical world (1931-1945) -- A psychedelic paradigm of history -- Hallucinating the end of history: reflections on myth, the eschaton and the problem of overcoming modernity.
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  37. Visions of a Place Beyond Time: Nishida Kitaro's Historical World and the Problem of Overcoming Modernity.Eric Paul Cunningham - 2004 - Dissertation, University of Oregon
    Since the end of World War II, the historical philosophy of Japanese thinker Nishida Kitaro has been the subject of ongoing academic controversy. Scholarly opinion concerning Nishida's historical philosophy seems to be divided into two main camps. The first consists mostly of intellectual historians, who criticize Nishida's work for its evident support of Japanese militarism during the 1930s and 1940s. The second consists largely of religious scholars, who either excuse Nishida's historical work as the product of the author's imperfect understanding (...)
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  38. L'Hexagone et l'Archipel. Henri Bergson lu par un philosophe japonais. Trois études. Postface de Frédéric Worms.Michel Dalissier - 2015 - Kimé.
    Qu’advient-il quand, à la pointe extrême du continent eurasien, la méditation de l’un des plus grands penseurs français franchit les océans pour être accueillie, critiquée sans concession aussi bien que reprise ? Faut-il s’attendre au récit d’un malentendu quand Henri Bergson se trouve relu par son contemporain Nishida Kitarô, né deux années après que son pays se soit ouvert à l’Occident ? Ce dernier va-t-il, depuis le Japon, risquer avec la pensée française ce que firent jadis les européens Leibniz et (...)
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  39. Nishida Kitarō and Chinese Philosophy. 2: Debt and Distance.Michel Dalissier - 2010 - Japan Review 22:137-170.
    Th is paper is the second part of a general study on the relationship between Nishida and Chinese philosophy. In the fi rst, I explored the extent to which Nishida’s philosophy was infl uenced, directly and indirectly, explicitly and implicitly, historically and conceptually, by materials coming from the intellectual horizon of Chinese thought. I concentrate here on Nishida’s own position toward what he understood by “Chinese philosophy.” Is this philosophy, so suggestive for Nishida, promoted to a central place in his (...)
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  40. Nishida Kitaro and Chinese Philosophy.Michel Dalissier - 2009 - In Wing-Keung Lam & Ching-Yuen Cheung (eds.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy 4: Facing the 21st Century. Nanzan. pp. 211-250.
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  41. Anfractuosité et unification. La philosophie de Nishida Kitarô. Préface de Yasuhiko Sugimura.Michel Dalissier - 2009 - Droz.
    Anfractuosité et unification consiste en une introduction à la pensée de Nishida Kitarô (1870-1945), au moyen du fil directeur interprétatif qu’est la notion d’« unification » (tôitsusuru). Que signifie unifier : atteindre une unité dernière, ou bien poursuivre « sans cesse » l’unité ? Une telle poursuite ne revient-t-elle pas à un « néant pur et simple » ? En fait, cette crainte ne proviendrait-elle pas de ce que l’homme ne peut faire face à l’« infini » qui se trouve (...)
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  42. Nishida Kitarô et la Philosophie du Japon.Michel Dalissier - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 29:171-181.
    le destin singulier de l’aventure philosophique japonaise du XXème siècle nous invite, avec son premier grand représentant, Nishida Kitarô (1870-1945), à un geste d’ « unification » spirituelle, s’illustrant tout d’abord par une lecture stupéfiante de l’histoire de la philosophie occidentale, méditant et critiquant tout à la fois la pensée orientale au sein de laquelle elle s’enracine. Mais ensuite, ces recherches singulières ont pour enjeu plus souterrain de s’enquêter du « lieu » même, au sein duquel une acception plus profonde (...)
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  43. La topologie philosophique.Michel Dalissier - 2008 - Archives de Philosophie 4 (4):631-668.
    Cette étude consiste en une introduction en neuf étapes à la pensée du philosophe japonais Nishida Kitarô . Le néant nous livre des traces diffuses, que nous aimierions bien effacer à la lumière de l’être. Cependant, une fois appréhendé logiquement et approché phénoménologiquement, le néant révèle une structuration topologique remarquable, qui met en question les problématiques de la métaphysique et de la morale, en particulier concernant la distinction entre l’espace et le lieu, le vide et le plein et les rapports (...)
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  44. The Idea of the Mirror in DōGen and Nishida.Michel Dalissier - 2006 - In James W. Heisig (ed.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy Vol.1. Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 99-142.
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  45. The Idea of the Mirror in Dōgen and Nishida.Michel Dalissier - 2006 - In James W. Heisig (ed.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy Vol.1. Nagoya: Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 99-142.
    The image of the “mirror” (鏡kagami) appears frequently in the philosophical texts of Nishida Kitaro (西田幾多郎1870-1945), where it assumes various functions. Mirror references first occur in meditations on the philosophies of Josiah Royce (1855-1916) and Henri Bergson (1859-1941). The most fascinating evocation here corresponds to the idea of a “self-enlightening mirror”, used to probe the philosophical ground for self-illumination. This idea seems to point back to Buddhist meaning that intervenes in Japanese intellectual history. We take this as our warrant for (...)
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  46. Japanese Philosophy, Nothingness, The World, and the Body.Michel Dalissier, Nagai Shin & Sugimura Yasuhiko (eds.) - 2013 - Paris: Vrin.
    L’acte de la philosophie japonaise est celui d’un évidement de soi: acte d’accueil des traditions philosophiques du monde, acte en résonance, créateur d’une terminologie, d’une logique, d’une conceptualité originales, s’alimentant aux sources d’une pensée mythique jamais tarie. Les textes présentés ici en feront sentir l’inclassable nouveauté: cette philosophie n’est ni purement shintoïste, bouddhique, chrétienne, néoconfucianiste ; elle n’est ni « orientale » ni « occidentale », mais proprement japonaise.
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  47. Toward a World of Worlds: Nishida, The Kyoto School, and the Place of Cross-Cultural Dialogue.Bret W. Davis - 2006 - In James W. Heisig (ed.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy Vol.1. Nagoya: Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 184-204.
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  48. Toward a World of Worlds: Nishida, The Kyoto School, and the Place of Cross-Cultural Dialogue.Bret W. Davis - 2006 - In James W. Heisig (ed.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy Vol.1. Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 184-204.
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  49. Provocative Ambivalences in Japanese Philosophy of Religion: With a Focus on Nishida and Zen.Bret W. Davis - 2004 - In James W. Heisig (ed.), Japanese Philosophy Abroad. Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 306-339.
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  50. Provocative Ambivalences in Japanese Philosophy of Religion: With a Focus on Nishida and Zen.Bret W. Davis - 2004 - In James W. Heisig (ed.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy: Japanese Philosophy Abroad. Nagoya: Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 306-339.
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