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Subcategories:History/traditions: Non-Human Animals

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  1. Margery Fee. Polar Bear. (Animal.) 224 Pp., Figs., Bibl., Index. London: Reaktion Books, 2019. £12.95 (Paper); ISBN 9781789141467. [REVIEW]Ann Norton Greene - 2021 - Isis 112 (1):168-169.
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  2. Human Beings Among the Beasts.Andrew M. Bailey & Alexander R. Pruss - forthcoming - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly.
    In this article, we develop and defend a new argument for animalism -- the thesis that we human persons are human animals. The argument takes this rough form: since our pets are animals, we are too. We’ll begin with remarks on animalism and its rivals, develop our main argument, and then defend it against a few replies.
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  3. Issues and Themes in Comparative Studies: Language, Cognition and Culture .Louise Röska-Hardy - 2008 - In Louise Röska-Hardy & Eva Neumann-Held (eds.), In: Learning from animals? Examining the nature of human uniqueness. Hove, UK: pp. 1-12.
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  4. Posthumanism: A Guide for the Perplexed. By Peter Mahon. Pp. Vi, 346, London, Bloomsbury Academic, 2017, £21.99.Peter Admirand - 2020 - Heythrop Journal 61 (3):587-588.
    In Posthumanism: A Guide for the Perplexed, Peter Mahon gives his readers an overview of posthumanism, examining the intoxicating-and often troubling-entanglements of humans, animals and technology in science, society and culture that constitute its field. Mahon not only explores the key scientific advances in information technology and genetics have made us and society posthuman, but also how certain strands in art (such as science fiction and video games) and philosophy (for example, in the work of Andy Clarke and Jacques Derrida) (...)
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  5. Learning From Animals? Examining the Nature of Human Uniqueness.Louise Röska-Hardy & Eva M. Neumann-Held (eds.) - 2008 - London: Psychology Press.
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  6. How to Tell If Animals Can Understand Death.Susana Monsó - forthcoming - Erkenntnis:1-20.
    It is generally assumed that humans are the only animals who can possess a concept of death. However, the ubiquity of death in nature and the evolutionary advantages that would come with an understanding of death provide two prima facie reasons for doubting this assumption. In this paper, my intention is not to defend that animals of this or that nonhuman species possess a concept of death, but rather to examine how we could go about empirically determining whether animals can (...)
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  7. Animal Moral Psychologies.Susana Monsó & Kristin Andrews - forthcoming - In John M. Doris & Manuel Vargas (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Moral Psychology. New York: Oxford University Press.
    Observations of animals engaging in apparently moral behavior have led academics and the public alike to ask whether morality is shared between humans and other animals. Some philosophers explicitly argue that morality is unique to humans, because moral agency requires capacities that are only demonstrated in our species. Other philosophers argue that some animals can participate in morality because they possess these capacities in a rudimentary form. Scientists have also joined the discussion, and their views are just as varied as (...)
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  8. The Problem of Evil: Unseen Animal Suffering.Daniel Molto - forthcoming - Religious Studies.
    On my view, every bone, every fossil, and every putrid whiff of carrion that one smells on a hike in the country is just as good evidence for a divine intervention as it is for the suffering of an animal.
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  9. Deconstructing Anthropocentric Privilege: Imago Dei and Nonhuman Agency.Daniel P. Horan - 2019 - Heythrop Journal 60 (4):560-570.
  10. Animal Lessons. [REVIEW]Bronwyn Singleton - 2011 - Symposium 15 (1):241-245.
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  11. Reckoning with the Beast: Animals, Pain, and Humanity in the Victorian Mind. James Turner.Lindsay Granshaw - 1982 - Isis 73 (2):321-322.
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  12. Animal Lifestyles and Anatomies: The Case of the Prosimian Primates.Russell H. Tuttle - 1991 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 34 (4):617-618.
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  13. Man, The Believing Animal.F. H. Heinemann - 1954 - Hibbert Journal 53:51.
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  14. Descartes' Bête Machine, the Leibnizian Correction and Religious Influence.John Voelpel - unknown
    René Descartes’ 1637 “bête machine” characterization of nonhuman animals has assisted in the strengthening of the Genesis 1:26 and 1: 28 disparate categorization of nonhuman animals and human animals. That characterization appeared in Descartes’ first important published writing, the Discourse on the Method, and can be summarized as including the ideas that nonhuman animals are like machines; do not have thoughts, reason or souls like human animals; and thus, cannot be categorized with humans; and, as a result, do not experience (...)
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  15. Reply to Dale Jamieson and Marc Bekoff.Kenneth Joel Shapiro - unknown
  16. The Lion's Share.Ian Ground & Michael Bavidge - forthcoming - The Philosopher.
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Critical Animal Studies
  1. Being Consistently Biocentric: On the (Im)Possibility of Spinozist Animal Ethics.Chandler D. Rogers - 2021 - Journal for Critical Animal Studies 18 (1):52-72.
    Spinoza’s attitude toward nonhuman animals is uncharacteristically cruel. This essay elaborates upon this ostensible idiosyncrasy in reference to Hasana Sharp’s commendable desire to revitalize a basis for animal ethics from within the bounds of his system. Despite our favoring an ethics beginning from animal affect, this essay argues that an animal ethic adequate to the demands of our historical moment cannot be developed from within the confines of strict adherence to Spinoza’s system—and this is not yet to speak of a (...)
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  2. Capitalism's Holocaust of the Animals: A Non-Marxist Critique of Capital, Philosophy and Patriarchy.Katerina Kolozova - 2019 - London, UK: Bloomsbury Academic.
    Laruelle's version of Marxism is termed "non-Marxism" whereby the "non-" is stated to stand for bracketing out Marxism's "philosophical sufficiency" and seeking to radicalise Marxism. It stands for the Laruellian non-philosophical variant of Marxism. It is precisely the non-philosophical use of Marx that has enabled the analysis at hand, demonstrating that at the heart of patriarchy and capitalism stands philosophical reason and its treatment of the Animal (both human and non-human). Women are de-realised even as use value and what is (...)
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  3. From the Hiatus Model to the Diffuse Discontinuities: A Turning Point in Human-Animal Studies.Carlo Brentari - 2018 - Biosemiotics 11 (3):331-345.
    In twentieth-century continental philosophy, German philosophical anthropology can be seen as a sort of conceptual laboratory devoted to human/animal research, and, in particular, to the discontinuity between human and non-human animals. Its main notion—the idea of the special position of humans in nature—is one of the first philosophical attempts to think of the specificity of humans as a natural and qualitative difference from non-human animals. This school of thought correctly rejects both the metaphysical and/or religious characterisations of humans, and the (...)
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  4. Beyond Biosecurity.Chandler D. Rogers - 2018 - Environmental Philosophy 15 (1):7-19.
    As boundaries between domesticity and the undomesticated increasingly blur for cohabitants of Vancouver Island, home to North America’s densest cougar population, predatorial problems become more and more pressing. Rosemary-Claire Collard responds on a pragmatic plane, arguing that the encounter between human and cougar is only ever destructive, that contact results in death and almost always for the cougar. Advocating for vigilance in policing boundaries separating cougar from civilization, therefore, she looks to Foucault’s analysis of modern biopower in the first volume (...)
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  5. Le partage du monde: Husserl et la constitution des animaux comme « autres moi ».Christiane Bailey - 2013 - Chiasmi International 15:219-250.
    While phenomenologists claim to have overcome solipsism, most have not pushed beyond the boundaries of individual human intersubjectivity to that of individuals of other species. Yet Husserl recognizes the existence of an interspecific intersubjectivity, an intersubjectivity beyond the limits of the species. He even goes so far as to say that we sometimes understand a companion animal better than a foreign human. However, even if he admits that many animals are capable of a life of subjective consciousness and live in (...)
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  6. Review of Jean-Christophe Bailly, The Animal Side. [REVIEW]Chandler D. Rogers - 2016 - Between the Species 19 (1):215-220.
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  7. Encountering the Animal Other: Reflections on Moments of Empathic Seeing.Scott D. Churchill - 2006 - Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 6 (sup1):1-13.
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  8. The Animal Inside: Essays at the Intersection of Philosophical Anthropology and Animal Studies.Geoffrey Dierckxsens, Rudmer Bijlsma, Michael Begun & Thomas Kiefer (eds.) - 2016 - Rowman & Littlefield International.
    A team of renowned philosophers and a new generation of thinkers come together to offer the first book-length examination of the relationship between philosophical anthropology and animal studies.
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  9. Domesticating Animals: Description of a Certain Disturbance.Szymon Wróbel - 2014 - Dialogue and Universalism 24 (1):173-191.
    In my text, I ask—investigating mainly the works of Freud, Lévi-Strauss, and Kafka—if humanity empowered by kinship or even contamination with other species would be a sick society, frail and ill-selected, or whether it would rather be a society which is active and audacious, devoid of the traces of resentment towards other living beings. I analyze the mono-individual species on the basis of examples which are clinical , literary , and also those borrowed from mass culture in order to illustrate (...)
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  10. Why Do We Go to the Zoo?: Communication, Animals, and the Cultural-Historical Experience of Zoos.Erik A. Garrett - 2013 - Fairleigh Dickinson University Press.
    This book is a phenomenological investigation of the zoo visit experience. Why Do We Go to the Zoo? is rooted in Husserlian phenomenology and focuses on the communicative interactions between humans and animals in the zoo setting.
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  11. Marx on Humans and Animals.Ted Benton - 1984 - In Sean Sayers & Peter Osborne (eds.), Socialism, Feminism, and Philosophy: A Radical Philosophy Reader. Routledge. pp. 235.
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  12. The Birth of the Herd.Dimitrij Mlekuž - 2013 - Society and Animals 21 (2):150-161.
    One of the most significant contributions of archaeology to the studies of human-animal relations is the concept of the “domestication” of non-human animals. Domestication is often seen as a specific human-animal relation that explains the ways people and animals interact. However, I argue, that “domestication” does not explain anything but has to be explained or “reassembled” by focusing on the many historically specific ways human and animals live together. Thus, the paper tackles the emergence of a “herd”, an assembly of (...)
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  13. Der Mensch, das Tier. [REVIEW]Kristin Hagen - 2011 - Philosophische Rundschau 58 (2):139 - 157.
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  14. Why Was Thomas A. Sebeok Not a Cognitive Ethologist? From “Animal Mind” to “Semiotic Self”.Timo Maran - 2010 - Biosemiotics 3 (3):315-329.
    In the current debates about zoosemiotics its relations with the neighbouring disciplines are a relevant topic. The present article aims to analyse the complex relations between zoosemiotics and cognitive ethology with special attention to their establishers: Thomas A. Sebeok and Donald R. Griffin. It is argued that zoosemiotics and cognitive ethology have common roots in comparative studies of animal communication in the early 1960s. For supporting this claim Sebeok’s works are analysed, the classical and philosophical periods of his zoosemiotic views (...)
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  15. From Blubber and Baleen to Buddha of the Deep: The Rise of the Metaphysical Whale.Frank Zelko - 2012 - Society and Animals 20 (1):91-108.
    Human attitudes to various nonhuman animals have varied considerably\nacross cultures and throughout time. While some of our responses are\nundoubtedly instinctive and universal-a visceral fear of large\ncarnivores or the feeling of spontaneous warmth for creatures exhibiting\nhigh degrees of neoteny-it is clear that our attitude toward specific\nspecies is largely shaped by our innate anthropomorphism: that is, when\nwe think about animals, we are also thinking about ourselves. There are\nfew better examples of this than the shifting attitudes toward whales\nand dolphins throughout the 20th century, (...)
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  16. The Lived Revolution: Solidarity with the Body in Pain as the New Political Universal.Katerina Kolozova - 2010 - Evro-Balkan Press.
    The book explores the themes of a) “radical concepts” in politics (inspired by François Laruelle’s “non-Marxism” and “non-philosophy,” developed in accordance with Badiouan and Žižekian “realism”); b) politically relevant and applicable epistemologies of “Thought’s Correlating with the Real” (Laruelle), inspired by Laruelle, Badiou and Žižek and c) the possibility of hybridization of the epistemic stance of “radical concept” with the politics of grief and “identification with the suffering itself” proposed by Judith Butler. Radical concepts, the political vision and the theory (...)
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  17. Between Explanation and Understanding: Hermeneutical Circles, Animal Minds and Internal Causes of Behavior.A. M. Karremans & P. Sleurink - unknown
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Non-Human Animals, Misc
  1. Anna Marie Roos. Goldfish. (Animal.) 206 Pp., Refs., Bibl., Index. London: Reaktion Books, 2019. £12.95 (Paper); ISBN 9781789141351. [REVIEW]Lijing Jiang - 2021 - Isis 112 (1):171-173.
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  2. Minds Without Spines: Evolutionarily Inclusive Animal Ethics.Irina Mikhalevich - 2020 - Animal Sentience 29 (1).
    Invertebrate animals are frequently lumped into a single category and denied welfare protections despite their considerable cognitive, behavioral, and evolutionary diversity. Some ethical and policy inroads have been made for cephalopod molluscs and crustaceans, but the vast majority of arthropods, including the insects, remain excluded from moral consideration. We argue that this exclusion is unwarranted given the existing evidence. Anachronistic readings of evolution, which view invertebrates as lower in the scala naturae, continue to influence public policy and common morality. The (...)
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  3. Institution as the Model of Meaning: Gehlen and Merleau-Ponty on the Question of Anthropology.Jiří Klouda & Jan Halák - 2018 - Filosoficky Casopis 66 (6):869-888.
    [This paper is written in Czech language.] The aim of the article is to re-evaluate the still-surviving anthropological trope which, in reaction to an inquiry into the essence of man, compares humans with animals and points to culture as the means by which humans complete their “deficient” nature. This motif contrasting humans with animals has been extended by A. Gehlen who characterises humans as “beings of deficiencies”. In his view, the morphological-instinctive insufficiency of the human being must be stabilised by (...)
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  4. Approaching Other Animals with Caution: Exploring Insights From Aquinas's Psychology.Daniel D. De Haan - 2019 - New Blackfriars 100 (1090):715-737.
    In this essay I explore the resources Thomas Aquinas provides for enquiries concerning the psychological abilities of nonhuman animals. I first look to Aquinas’s account of divine, angelic, human, and nonhuman animal naming, to help us articulate the contours of a ‘critical anthropocentrism’ that aims to steer clear of the mistakes of a na¨ıve anthropocentrism and misconceived avowals to entirely eschew anthropocentrism. I then address the need for our critical anthropocentrism both to reject the mental-physical dichotomy endorsed by ‘folk psychology’ (...)
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  5. Beast or God? – The Intermediate Status of Humans and the Physical Basis of the Stoic Scala Naturae.Jula Wildberger - 2008 - In Annetta Alexandridis, Lorenz Winkler-Horacek & Markus Wild (eds.), Mensch und Tier in der Antike. Wiesbaden: Reichert. pp. 47-70.
    Argues that the demarcation between humans and animals in Stoicism is made in functional terms, by their different capacities, but also quantitative terms, as smaller or larger shares of pneuma and thus the active principle Gods. Discusses how they Stoics may have related these two categories and makes a case for the possibility to formulate a non-exploitative animal ethic in Stoic terms.
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  6. Is Vegetarianism Healthy for Children?Nathan Cofnas - 2019 - Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition 59 (13):2052-2060.
    According to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics’ influential position statement on vegetarianism, meat and seafood can be replaced with milk, soy/legumes, and eggs without any negative effects in children. The United States Department of Agriculture endorses a similar view. The present paper argues that the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics ignores or gives short shrift to direct and indirect evidence that vegetarianism may be associated with serious risks for brain and body development in fetuses and children. Regular supplementation with (...)
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  7. Review of Jennison, Animals for Show and Pleasure. [REVIEW]D'Arcy W. Thompson - 1938 - The Classical Review 52 (2):77-77.
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  8. Dignity and Animals. Does It Make Sense to Apply the Concept of Dignity to All Sentient Beings?Federico Zuolo - 2016 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 19 (5):1117-1130.
    Although the idea of dignity has always been applied to human beings and although its role is far from being uncontroversial, some recent works in animal ethics have tried to apply the idea of dignity to animals. The aim of this paper is to discuss critically whether these attempts are convincing and sensible. In order to assess these proposals, I put forward two formal conditions that any conception of dignity must meet and outline three main approaches which might justify the (...)
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  9. Are Animals Just Noisy Machines?: Louis Boutan and the Co-Invention of Animal and Child Psychology in the French Third Republic.Marion Thomas - 2005 - Journal of the History of Biology 38 (3):425-460.
    Historians of science have only just begun to sample the wealth of different approaches to the study of animal behavior undertaken in the twentieth century. To date, more attention has been given to Lorenzian ethology and American behaviorism than to other work and traditions, but different approaches are equally worthy of the historian's attention, reflecting not only the broader range of questions that could be asked about animal behavior and the "animal mind" but also the different contexts in which these (...)
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  10. The Alienation of Humans and Animals in Uplift Fiction.Ina Roy-Faderman - 2015 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 39 (1):78-97.
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  11. Mechanizing the Sensitive Soul.Gary Hatfield - 2012 - In Gideon Manning (ed.), Matter and Form in Early Modern Science and Philosophy. Brill. pp. 151–86.
    Descartes set for himself the ambitious program of accounting for the functions of the Aristotelian vegetative and sensitive souls without invoking souls or the faculties or powers of souls in his explanations. He rejects the notion that the soul is hylomorphically present in the organs of the body so as to carry out vital and sensory functions. Rather, the body’s organs operate in a purely mechanical fashion. That is what is involved in “mechanizing” these phenomena. The role of the soul (...)
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  12. Animals.Gary Hatfield - 2008 - In Janet Broughton & John Carriero (eds.), Companion to Descartes. Blackwell. pp. 404–425.
    This chapter considers philosophical problems concerning non-human (and sometimes human) animals, including their metaphysical, physical, and moral status, their origin, what makes them alive, their functional organization, and the basis of their sensitive and cognitive capacities. I proceed by assuming what most of Descartes’s followers and interpreters have held: that Descartes proposed that animals lack sentience, feeling, and genuinely cognitive representations of things. (Some scholars interpret Descartes differently, denying that he excluded sentience, feeling, and representation from animals, and I consider (...)
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  13. Deleuze's Larval Subject and the Question of Bodily TIme.Tano S. Posteraro - forthcoming - Symposium: Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy/Revue canadienne de philosophie continentale.
    This paper treats Deleuze's first synthesis of time and the corresponding concept of larval subjectivity by routing it through a biophilosophy of organism. I develop, out of my reading of Deleuze, a temporal concept of organismic subjectivity.
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  14. Organismic Spatiality: Toward a Metaphysic of Composition.Tano S. Posteraro - 2014 - Environment and Planning D 32 (4):739-752.
  15. On the Utility of Virtuality for Relating Abilities and Affordances.Tano S. Posteraro - 2014 - Ecological Psychology 26 (4):353-367.
  16. A Concise History Of Ornithology. [REVIEW]Paul Fisher - 2004 - Isis 95:105-105.
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  17. The Open: Man and Animal. [REVIEW]Michael O’Sullivan - 2004 - Radical Philosophy 128.
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1 — 50 / 77