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History/traditions: Non-Human Animals

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  1. "Une voie moyenne entre les discours sur la 'souffrance' des animaux et leur réduction au statut de biens meubles".Philippe Gagnon - 2024 - In Marie Pelé & Catherine Vialle (eds.), La vulnérabilité de l'animal en question : Vulnérabilités du vivant II. Paris: Éditions du Cerf. pp. 87-103.
  2. Healing as an Object: Curation, Sentience, and Slowness.Jan Gresil Kahambing - 2024 - Oxford Public Philosophy 4.
  3. Are humans the only rational animals?Giacomo Melis & Susana Monsó - 2023 - The Philosophical Quarterly (3):844-864.
    While growing empirical evidence suggests a continuity between human and non-human psychology, many philosophers still think that only humans can act and form beliefs rationally. In this paper, we challenge this claim. We first clarify the notion of rationality. We then focus on the rationality of beliefs and argue that, in the relevant sense, humans are not the only rational animals. We do so by first distinguishing between unreflective and reflective responsiveness to epistemic reasons in belief formation and revision. We (...)
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  4. Rawls and Animal Moral Personality.Guy Baldwin - 2023 - Animals 13:1238.
    The relationship between animal rights and contractarian theories of justice such as that of Rawls has long been vexed. In this article, I contribute to the debate over the possibility of inclusion of animals in Rawls’s theory of justice by critiquing the rationale he gives for their omission: that they do not possess moral personality. Contrary to Rawls’s assumptions, it appears that some animals may possess the moral powers that comprise moral personality, albeit to a lesser extent than most humans. (...)
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  5. Agency, Inventiveness, and Animal Play: Novel Insights into the Active Role of Organisms in Evolution.Mathilde Tahar - 2023 - Spontaneous Generations 11 (1).
    Agency is a central concept in the organisational approach to organisms, which accounts for their internal purposiveness. Recent recognition of the active role played by organisms in evolution has led researchers to use this concept in an evolutionary approach. Agency is then considered in terms of ‘unintentional’ choice: agents choose from a given repertoire the behaviour most appropriate to their goal, with this choice influencing evolutionary pathways. This view, while allowing for the evolutionary role of the activity of organisms, presents (...)
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  6. Normative expectations in human and nonhuman animals.Susana Monsó & Richard Moore - forthcoming - Perspectives on Psychological Science.
    We admire Heyes's attempt to develop a mechanistic account of norm cognition. Nonetheless, her account leaves us unsure of whom Heyes counts as normative agents, and on what grounds. Therefore we ask a series of questions designed to clarify which features of Heyes's account she thinks are necessary and sufficient for norm cognition.
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  7. The Evolutionary Foundations of Common Ground.Josh Armstrong - forthcoming - In Bart Geurts & Richard Moore (eds.), Evolutionary Pragmatics. Oxford University Press.
    (Penultimate Draft). I consider common ground in its evolutionary context and argue for several claims. First, common ground is widely (though not universally) distributed among social animals. Second, the use of common ground is favored (i.e. is predicted to emerge and subsequently persist) among populations of animals whose members face recurrent interdependent decision-making problems in which the benefit of their courses of action are contingent on the variable choices of their stable social partner(s). Third, humans deploy cognitive and social mechanisms (...)
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  8. Animals as criminals: Towards a Foucauldian analysis of animal trials.Emre Koyuncu - 2018 - Parergon 35 (1):79-96.
    Scholarship on the early modern practice of animal trials in Europe has grown substantially in the last few decades. After a critical literature review pointing at the shortcomings of positivist approaches and of the interpretation of the phenomenon as a purely religious practice, I present Foucauldian genealogy as a more rigorous framework for understanding the purpose this peculiar practice may have served. The benefits of adopting a Foucauldian perspective are twofold. First, it allows for a subtle functionalism that does not (...)
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  9. The problem of evil: unseen animal suffering.Daniel Molto - 2021 - Religious Studies 57 (2):353-371.
    On my view, every bone, every fossil, and every putrid whiff of carrion that one smells on a hike in the country is just as good evidence for a divine intervention as it is for the suffering of an animal.
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  10. What could cognition be, if not human cognition?: Individuating cognitive abilities in the light of evolution.Carrie Figdor - 2022 - Biology and Philosophy 37 (6):1-21.
    I argue that an explicit distinction between cognitive characters and cognitive phenotypes is needed for empirical progress in the cognitive sciences and their integration with evolution-guided sciences. I elaborate what ontological commitment to characters involves and how such a commitment would clarify ongoing debates about the relations between human and nonhuman cognition and the extent of cognitive abilities across biological species. I use theoretical proposals in episodic memory, language, and sociocultural bases of cognition to illustrate how cognitive characters are being (...)
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  11. How to Tell If Animals Can Understand Death.Susana Monsó - 2019 - Erkenntnis 87 (1):117-136.
    It is generally assumed that humans are the only animals who can possess a concept of death. However, the ubiquity of death in nature and the evolutionary advantages that would come with an understanding of death provide two prima facie reasons for doubting this assumption. In this paper, my intention is not to defend that animals of this or that nonhuman species possess a concept of death, but rather to examine how we could go about empirically determining whether animals can (...)
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  12. The problem of interspecies welfare comparisons (preprint).Heather Browning - manuscript
    One of the biggest problems in applications of animal welfare science is our ability to make comparisons between different individuals, particularly different species. Although welfare science provides methods for measuring the welfare of individual animals, there’s no established method for comparing measures between individuals. This problem occurs because of the underdetermination of the conclusions given the data, arising from two sources of variation that we cannot distinguish – variation in the underlying target variable (welfare experience) and in the relationship of (...)
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  13. La zarigüeya de Schrödinger: Cómo viven y entienden la muerte los animales.Susana Monsó - 2021 - Madrid, Spain: Plaza y Valdés.
    Cuando la zarigüeya se siente amenazada, se paraliza, con los ojos y la boca abiertos en una mueca petrificada, la temperatura corporal y respiración reducidas al mínimo, la lengua desplegando un tono azulado y sus glándulas anales oliendo a podrido. Pese a este disfraz de cadáver putrefacto, sigue pendiente de su entorno, lista para volver a la acción. Como el gato en la famosa paradoja de Schrödinger, la zarigüeya está viva y muerta al mismo tiempo. -/- En este libro exploraremos (...)
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  14. Curiosidad clasificatoria y cultura nacional en el Reino Unido entre los siglos XVIII y XIX. Reseña de Harriet Ritvo, The Platypus and the Mermaid and Other Figments of the Classifying Imagination, Cambridge, Harvard University Press, 1997. [REVIEW]Biani Paola Sánchez López -
  15. Communication before communicative intentions.Josh Armstrong - 2021 - Noûs 57 (1):26-50.
    This paper explores the significance of intelligent social behavior among non-human animals for philosophical theories of communication. Using the alarm call system of vervet monkeys as a case study, I argue that interpersonal communication (or what I call “minded communication”) can and does take place in the absence of the production and recognition of communicative intentions. More generally, I argue that evolutionary theory provides good reasons for maintaining that minded communication is both temporally and explanatorily prior to the use of (...)
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  16. Noble Animals, Brutish Animals.Marcus Hunt - 2021 - Between the Species 24 (1):70-92.
    The paper begins with a description of a grey seal performing conspecific infanticide. The paper then gives an account of “nobleness” and “brutishness.” Roughly, a behavioural-disposition is noble/brutish if it is one that would be a moral virtue/vice if the possessor of the behavioural-disposition were a moral agent. The paper then advances two pairs of axiological claims. The first pair of claims is that nobleness is good and that brutishness is bad. The second pair of claims is about an axiological (...)
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  17. Margery Fee. Polar Bear. (Animal.) 224 pp., figs., bibl., index. London: Reaktion Books, 2019. £12.95 (paper); ISBN 9781789141467. [REVIEW]Ann Norton Greene - 2021 - Isis 112 (1):168-169.
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  18. Human beings among the beasts.Andrew M. Bailey & Alexander R. Pruss - 2021 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 102 (3):455-467.
    In this article, we develop and defend a new argument for animalism -- the thesis that we human persons are human animals. The argument takes this rough form: since our pets are animals, we are too. We’ll begin with remarks on animalism and its rivals, develop our main argument, and then defend it against a few replies.
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  19. Issues and Themes in comparative studies: Language, Cognition and Culture .Louise Röska-Hardy - 2008 - In Louise Röska-Hardy & Eva M. Neumann-Held (eds.), Learning from Animals? Examining the Nature of Human Uniqueness. London: Psychology Press. pp. 1-12.
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  20. Angelica Groom. Exotic Animals in the Art and Culture of the Medici Court in Florence. (Rulers and Elites, 16.) xix + 340 pp., figs., bibl., index. Leiden/Boston: Brill, 2018. €127 (cloth). E-book available. [REVIEW]Adriana Turpin - 2020 - Isis 111 (3):665-666.
  21. Michel Anctil. Luminous Creatures: The History and Science of Light Production in Living Organisms. xvii + 467 pp., bibl., index. Montreal/Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2018. $49.95 (cloth). E-book available. [REVIEW]Rachel A. Ankeny - 2020 - Isis 111 (3):654-655.
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  22. Michael Worboys; Julie-Marie Strange; Neil Pemberton. The Invention of the Modern Dog: Breed and Blood in Victorian Britain. (Animals, History, Culture.) viii + 282 pp., notes, index. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2018. [REVIEW]Peter Hobbins - 2020 - Isis 111 (2):407-409.
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  23. Posthumanism: A Guide for the Perplexed. By PeterMahon. Pp. vi, 346, London, Bloomsbury Academic, 2017, £21.99. [REVIEW]Peter Admirand - 2020 - Heythrop Journal 61 (3):587-588.
    In Posthumanism: A Guide for the Perplexed, Peter Mahon gives his readers an overview of posthumanism, examining the intoxicating-and often troubling-entanglements of humans, animals and technology in science, society and culture that constitute its field. Mahon not only explores the key scientific advances in information technology and genetics have made us and society posthuman, but also how certain strands in art (such as science fiction and video games) and philosophy (for example, in the work of Andy Clarke and Jacques Derrida) (...)
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  24. Learning from Animals? Examining the Nature of Human Uniqueness.Louise Röska-Hardy & Eva M. Neumann-Held (eds.) - 2008 - London: Psychology Press.
    Human language, cognition, and culture are unique; they are unparalleled in the animal kingdom. The claim that we can learn what makes us human by studying other animal species provokes vigorous reactions and many deny that comparative research can shed any light on the origins and character of human distinctive capacities. However, Learning from Animals? presents empirical research and an analysis of comparative approaches for an understanding of human uniqueness, arguing that we cannot know what capacities are uniquely human until (...)
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  25. A ‘monster with human visage’: The orangutan, savagery, and the borders of humanity in the global Enlightenment.Silvia Sebastiani - 2019 - History of the Human Sciences 32 (4):80-99.
    To what extent did the debate on the orangutan contribute to the global Enlightenment? This article focuses on the first 150 years of the introduction, dissection, and public exposition of the so-called ‘orangutan’ in Europe, between the 1630s, when the first specimens arrived in the Netherlands, and the 1770s, when the British debate about slavery and abolitionism reframed the boundaries between the human and animal kingdoms. Physicians, natural historians, antiquarians, philosophers, geographers, lawyers, and merchants all contributed to the knowledge of (...)
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  26. Animal moral psychologies.Susana Monsó & Kristin Andrews - 2022 - In Manuel Vargas & John Doris (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Moral Psychology. Oxford, U.K.: Oxford University Press.
    Observations of animals engaging in apparently moral behavior have led academics and the public alike to ask whether morality is shared between humans and other animals. Some philosophers explicitly argue that morality is unique to humans, because moral agency requires capacities that are only demonstrated in our species. Other philosophers argue that some animals can participate in morality because they possess these capacities in a rudimentary form. Scientists have also joined the discussion, and their views are just as varied as (...)
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  27. Deconstructing Anthropocentric Privilege: Imago Dei and Nonhuman Agency.Daniel P. Horan - 2019 - Heythrop Journal 60 (4):560-570.
  28. Fellow Creatures. Our Obligations to the Other Animals.Christine M. Korsgaard - 2018 - Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 73 (1):165-168.
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  29. Book review: When species meet: Donna Haraway, When Species Meet. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2008. ISBN 978-0-8166-5046-0. x + 420 pp. $24.95. [REVIEW]Duncan Wilson - 2009 - History of the Human Sciences 22 (1):149-155.
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  30. Animal Lessons. [REVIEW]Bronwyn Singleton - 2011 - Symposium: Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy/Revue canadienne de philosophie continentale 15 (1):241-245.
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  31. Reckoning with the Beast: Animals, Pain, and Humanity in the Victorian Mind. James Turner.Lindsay Granshaw - 1982 - Isis 73 (2):321-322.
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  32. Animal Affects: Spinoza and the Frontiers of the Human.Hasana Sharp - 2011 - Journal for Critical Animal Studies 9 (1-2):48-68.
    Like any broad narrative about the history of ideas, this one involves a number of simplifications. My hope is that by taking a closer look Spinoza's notorious remarks on animals, we can understand better why it becomes especially urgent in this period as well as our own for philosophers to emphasize a distinction between human and nonhuman animals. In diagnosing the concerns that give rise to the desire to dismiss the independent purposes of animals, we may come to focus on (...)
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  33. Man, The Believing Animal.F. H. Heinemann - 1954 - Hibbert Journal 53:51.
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  34. Primate Encounters: Models of Science, Gender, and Society. [REVIEW]Nina Jablonksi - 2002 - Isis 93:168-169.
    Primates have been studied by more people, from more angles, for longer periods of time than any other vertebrates. Primate studies have existed for over fifty years and have attracted leagues of students from diverse backgrounds to studies of primate behavior, ecology, and evolution. The nature of the primates and their students has insured that the field has enjoyed considerable public exposure. Most people with access to a television have watched programs in which the lives of baboons, chimps, or gorillas (...)
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  35. Descartes' Bête Machine, the Leibnizian Correction and Religious Influence.John Voelpel - unknown
    René Descartes’ 1637 “bête machine” characterization of nonhuman animals has assisted in the strengthening of the Genesis 1:26 and 1: 28 disparate categorization of nonhuman animals and human animals. That characterization appeared in Descartes’ first important published writing, the Discourse on the Method, and can be summarized as including the ideas that nonhuman animals are like machines; do not have thoughts, reason or souls like human animals; and thus, cannot be categorized with humans; and, as a result, do not experience (...)
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  36. Reply to Dale Jamieson and Marc Bekoff.Kenneth Joel Shapiro - unknown
  37. A Strong Distinction between Humans and Non-Humans is no Longer Required for Research Purposes: A Debate Between Bruno Latour and Steve Fuller.Colin Barron - 2003 - History of the Human Sciences 16 (2):77-99.
    The second International Knowledge and Discourse Conference, held at the University of Hong Kong in June 2002, was the forum for the long-awaited debate between Bruno Latour and Steve Fuller. Bruno Latour counts beyond two. He places the blame for the emphasis in academia on the subject-object distinction on Kant. Latour wants academics to acknowledge that things act, and suggests we look at other traditions, e.g. the Chinese, for alternatives to the subject-object dichotomy. Steve Fuller concentrated on the moral project (...)
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  38. The Lion's Share.Ian Ground & Michael Bavidge - forthcoming - The Philosopher.
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  39. Managing cows: an ethnography of breeding practices and uses of reproductive technology in contemporary dairy farming in Lombardy (Italy).Cristina Grasseni - 2007 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 38 (2):488-510.
    The aim of this article is to contribute detailed ethnographic material to broaden the scope of what we mean by reproductive technology. Technology can be defined not only by a series of laboratory techniques that are drafted into the daily management of the animal body, but also by a range of on-farm management strategies and working routines, as well as the cultural dispositions, social networks and tacit knowledge of the actors involved. RT is communicated to lay operators and disseminated amongst (...)
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  40. At the borders of the human: beasts, bodies, and natural philosophy in the early modern period.Erica Fudge, Ruth Gilbert & Susan Wiseman (eds.) - 1999 - New York: Palgrave.
    What is, what was the human? This book argues that the making of the human as it is now understood implies a renogotiation of the relationship between the self and the world. The development of Renaissance technologies of difference such as mapping, colonialism and anatomy paradoxically also illuminated the similarities between human and non-human. This collection considers the borders between humans and their imagined others: animals, women, native subjects, machines. It examines border creatures (hermaphrodites, wildmen, and cyborgs) and border practices (...)
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  41. Read them, then you simply must!Peter Singer - manuscript
    After reading Fouts' Next Of Kin I was speechless. I can express how wonderful it is to learn from an individual whose humility, concern for life and compassion is his life work. I simply could not put the book down! It was one of the most thoughtful, eye-opening, and educated books that I have ever read. Having the opportunity to listen to Roger Fouts speak on book tour, my heart opened to his message of compassion; his willingness to express his (...)
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Critical Animal Studies
  1. La philosophie animale de Bergson. Conscience du vivant, créativité instinctive et biologie contemporaine.Mathilde Tahar - 2024 - Thaumazein Rivista di Filosofia, 12 (1):83-107.
    The non-human animal holds a significant position in Bergson’s work. However, because it often serves to illuminate other concepts – humanity, the élan vital – few studies have delved into Bergson’s animal philosophy. However, Bergson’s conception of the animal as an instinctive but conscious being, distinct from humans but partaking, like them, in the élan vital, provides valuable philosophical tools to address contemporary challenges in ethology and evolutionary theory. The aim of this article is to analyse the paradoxical instinctive consciousness (...)
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  2. Ethical Extensionism Defended.Joel MacClellan - 2024 - Between the Species 27 (1):140-178.
    Ethical extensionism is a common argument pattern in environmental and animal ethics, which takes a morally valuable trait already recognized in us and argues that we should recognize that value in other entities such as nonhuman animals. I exposit ethical extensionism’s core argument, argue for its validity and soundness, and trace its history to 18th century progressivist calls to expand the moral community and legal franchise. However, ethical extensionism has its critics. The bulk of the paper responds to recent criticisms, (...)
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  3. More Ethics Than Politics, More Animals Than Species.Joel MacClellan - 2016 - Humanimalia 8 (1):120-30.
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  4. Review of The Imaginary of Animals by Annabelle Dufourcq. [REVIEW]Chandler D. Rogers - 2023 - Environmental Philosophy 20 (1):163-169.
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  5. Human-Animal Relationships and Animal Ethics in Crisis: A New Way Out? “Animal Crisis: A New Critical Theory” by Alice Crary and Lori Gruen. [REVIEW]Konstantin Deininger - 2023 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 36 (2):1-5.
  6. The importance of end-of-life welfare.Heather Browning & Walter Veit - 2022 - Animal Frontiers 12 (1):8–15.
    The conditions of transport and slaughter at the end of their lives are a major challenge to the welfare of agricultural animals. • End-of-life experiences should be of a greater ethical concern than others of similar intensity and duration, due to their position in the animal’s life. • End-of-life welfare can have both internal importance to the animals and external ethical importance to human decision-makers. • We should pay extra care to ensure that the conditions during transport and slaughter are (...)
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  7. Being Consistently Biocentric: On the (Im)possibility of Spinozist Animal Ethics.Chandler D. Rogers - 2021 - Journal for Critical Animal Studies 18 (1):52-72.
    Spinoza’s attitude toward nonhuman animals is uncharacteristically cruel. This essay elaborates upon this ostensible idiosyncrasy in reference to Hasana Sharp’s commendable desire to revitalize a basis for animal ethics from within the bounds of his system. Despite our favoring an ethics beginning from animal affect, this essay argues that an animal ethic adequate to the demands of our historical moment cannot be developed from within the confines of strict adherence to Spinoza’s system—and this is not yet to speak of a (...)
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  8. From the Hiatus Model to the Diffuse Discontinuities: A Turning Point in Human-Animal Studies.Carlo Brentari - 2018 - Biosemiotics 11 (3):331-345.
    In twentieth-century continental philosophy, German philosophical anthropology can be seen as a sort of conceptual laboratory devoted to human/animal research, and, in particular, to the discontinuity between human and non-human animals. Its main notion—the idea of the special position of humans in nature—is one of the first philosophical attempts to think of the specificity of humans as a natural and qualitative difference from non-human animals. This school of thought correctly rejects both the metaphysical and/or religious characterisations of humans, and the (...)
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  9. Beyond Biosecurity.Chandler D. Rogers - 2018 - Environmental Philosophy 15 (1):7-19.
    As boundaries between domesticity and the undomesticated increasingly blur for cohabitants of Vancouver Island, home to North America’s densest cougar population, predatorial problems become more and more pressing. Rosemary-Claire Collard responds on a pragmatic plane, arguing that the encounter between human and cougar is only ever destructive, that contact results in death and almost always for the cougar. Advocating for vigilance in policing boundaries separating cougar from civilization, therefore, she looks to Foucault’s analysis of modern biopower in the first volume (...)
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