Related categories
Subcategories:History/traditions: Non-Human Animals

81 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 81
Material to categorize
  1. Aristotle's Statement on the Reproduction of Sharks.Liliane Bodson - 1983 - Journal of the History of Biology 16 (3):391-407.
  2. Turtles Are Not Just Walking Stones: Conspicuous Coloration and Sexual Selection in Freshwater Turtles.Jindřich Brejcha & Karel Kleisner - 2016 - Biosemiotics 9 (2):247-266.
    Turtles are among the most intriguing amniotes but their communication and signaling have rarely been studied. Traditionally, they have been seen as basically just silent armored ‘walking stones’ with complex physiology but no altruism, maternal care, or aesthetic perception. Recently, however, we have witnessed a radical change in the perception of turtle behavioral and cognitive skills. In our study, we start by reviewing some recent findings pertaining to various highly developed behavioral and cognitive patterns with special emphasis on turtles. Then (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  3. Gestalt Experiments and Inductive Observations: Konrad Lorenz's Early Epistemological Writings and the Methods of Classical Ethology.Ingo Brigandt - 2003 - Evolution and Cognition 9:157–170.
    Ethology brought some crucial insights and perspectives to the study of behavior, in particular the idea that behavior can be studied within a comparative-evolutionary framework by means of homologizing components of behavioral patterns and by causal analysis of behavior components and their integration. Early ethology is well-known for its extensive use of qualitative observations of animals under their natural conditions. These observations are combined with experiments that try to analyze behavioral patterns and establish specific claims about animal behavior. Nowadays, there (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  4. On Two New Therocephalian Reptiles.R. Broom - 1904 - Transactions of the South African Philosophical Society 15 (1):85-88.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Plutonium and Marine Life.A. C. Brown - 1994 - Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 49 (2):213-224.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Qualitative and Quantitative Explanation of the Forms of Heat Sensitive Organs in Snakes.Tjard De Cock Buning - 1985 - Acta Biotheoretica 34 (2-4):193-205.
    Heat sensitive pit organs in different species of snakes show various shapes. The relation between form characters and functions were analysed by means of two different research programs. This paper presents the methodological steps involved in these research programs. The first approach is called a qualitative explanation because it connects experimental data by means of qualitative statements in order to give a functional morphological explanation for the construction of the pits in respect to the behaviour of the snake. The second (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Energetics, Scaling and Sexual Size Dimorphism of Spiders.M. Canals & B. Grossi - 2015 - Acta Biotheoretica 63 (1):71-81.
    The extreme sexual size dimorphism in spiders has motivated studies for many years. In many species the male can be very small relative to the female. There are several hypotheses trying to explain this fact, most of them emphasizing the role of energy in determining spider size. The aim of this paper is to review the role of energy in sexual size dimorphism of spiders, even for those spiders that do not necessarily live in high foliage, using physical and allometric (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. The Biology and Evolution of Bird Songs.Clive K. Catchpole - 1986 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 30 (1):47.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Dogs That Don't Bark in the Night: How to Investigate the Lack of a Domain of Expertise?Dorothy L. Cheney & Robert M. Seyfarth - 1992 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1992:92 - 109.
    Despite being excellent observers' of each others' behavior, vervet monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops) appear to be surprisingly ignorant about the behavior of the species that prey upon them. In particular, they fail to attend to many of the visual cues created by their predators. One explanation for this lack of attentiveness is that natural selection has favored skills in the social domain that cannot be extended to non-social contexts. In this paper, we review the ways that the term "domain" has been (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. The Origin of Animals: Can Molecular Clocks and the Fossil Record Be Reconciled?John A. Cunningham, Alexander G. Liu, Stefan Bengtson & Philip C. J. Donoghue - 2017 - Bioessays 39 (1):e201600120.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. The Origin of Animals: Can Molecular Clocks and the Fossil Record Be Reconciled?John A. Cunningham, Alexander G. Liu, Stefan Bengtson & Philip C. J. Donoghue - 2017 - Bioessays 39 (1):e201600120.
  12. The Birds of China.Rodolphe Meyer de Schauensee - 1985 - Journal of the History of Biology 18 (3):446-446.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. An Inverse Problem: Trappers Drove Hares to Eat Lynx.Bo Deng - 2018 - Acta Biotheoretica 66 (3):213-242.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  14. How to Make a Sterile Helper.Philip A. Downing, Charlie K. Cornwallis & Ashleigh S. Griffin - 2017 - Bioessays 39 (1):e201600136.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. Reckoning with the Beast: Animals, Pain, and Humanity in the Victorian Mind. James Turner.Lindsay Granshaw - 1982 - Isis 73 (2):321-322.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. The Lion's Share.Ian Ground & Michael Bavidge - forthcoming - The Philosopher.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17. Man, The Believing Animal.F. H. Heinemann - 1954 - Hibbert Journal 53:51.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. Review of Can Animals Be Moral? By Rowlands, M. [REVIEW]Tom McClelland - unknown
    In this vivid and engaging book Mark Rowlands asks whether animals are capable of being moral. His answer is a mitigated 'yes', supported by an ambitious and convincing philosophical argument. A great deal of attention has been given to the question of whether animals deserve our moral consideration. Much less has been given to the question of whether animals themselves are moral beings. The dominant view among both philosophers and scientists has been that they are not. The standard position is (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. Article Review of Are Animals Moral Beings?, A Critique of Personhood, Must We Value Life to Have a Right to It?, Ethics & Animals.James A. Nelson - unknown
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. Reply to Dale Jamieson and Marc Bekoff.Kenneth Joel Shapiro - unknown
  21. Animal Lessons.Bronwyn Singleton - 2011 - Symposium: Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy/Revue canadienne de philosophie continentale 15 (1):241-245.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. Can Animals Be Moral?, by Mark Rowlands.Robert Streiffer - 2016 - Mind 125 (498):619-623.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. Jakob von Uexküll : une ontologie des milieux.Olivier Surel - 2014 - Critique 2014 (803):306-319.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. Animal Lifestyles and Anatomies: The Case of the Prosimian Primates.Russell H. Tuttle - 1991 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 34 (4):617-618.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. Descartes' Bête Machine, the Leibnizian Correction and Religious Influence.John Voelpel - unknown
    René Descartes’ 1637 “bête machine” characterization of nonhuman animals has assisted in the strengthening of the Genesis 1:26 and 1: 28 disparate categorization of nonhuman animals and human animals. That characterization appeared in Descartes’ first important published writing, the Discourse on the Method, and can be summarized as including the ideas that nonhuman animals are like machines; do not have thoughts, reason or souls like human animals; and thus, cannot be categorized with humans; and, as a result, do not experience (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. Animal Psychology and Ethology in Britain and the Emergence of Professional Concern for the Concept of Ethical Cost [Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, 33C/2 (2002), 235–261]. [REVIEW]D. A. H. Wilson - 2003 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 34 (1):201-.
  27. " Animals Matter": Reflecting on the Work of Marc Bekoff.Donna Yarri, Graham Harvey, Jay McDaniel & Nancy Howell - forthcoming - Zygon.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
Animal Well-Being
  1. Animal Welfare and Animal Pain: Can Pain Sometimes Be Worse for Them Than for Us?Sahar Akhtar - 2011 - In The Oxford Handbook on Ethics and Animals.
  2. The Case Against Meat.Ben Bramble - forthcoming - In Ben Bramble Bob Fischer (ed.), The Moral Complexities of Eating Meat. Oxford University Press.
    There is a simple but powerful argument against the human practice of raising and killing animals for food (RKF for short). It goes like this: 1. RKF is extremely bad for animals. 2. RKF is only trivially good for human beings Therefore, 3. RKF should be stopped. While many consider this argument decisive, not everyone is convinced. There have been four main lines of objection to it. In this paper, I provide new responses to these four objections.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Animal Morality: What It Means and Why It Matters.Susana Monsó, Judith Benz-Schwarzburg & Annika Bremhorst - forthcoming - Journal of Ethics:1-28.
    It has been argued that some animals are moral subjects, that is, beings who are capable of behaving on the basis of moral motivations. In this paper, we do not challenge this claim. Instead, we presuppose its plausibility in order to explore what ethical consequences follow from it. Using the capabilities approach, we argue that beings who are moral subjects are entitled to enjoy positive opportunities for the flourishing of their moral capabilities, and that the thwarting of these capabilities entails (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Well-Being and Animals.Christopher Rice - 2016 - In Guy Fletcher (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Well-Being. New York, USA: Routledge. pp. 378-388.
    This essay examines several competing accounts of what makes life go well for non-human animals, including prominent subjective and objective theories of animal well-being.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Moral Grounds for Indigenous Hunting Rights.Makoto Usami - 2016 - Philosophy of Law in the Arctic.
    It is crucial for indigenous people living in the Arctic to harvest animals by hunting in a traditional manner, as is the case with such peoples in other parts of the world. Given the nutritional, economic, and cultural importance of hunting for aboriginal people, it seems reasonable to say that they have the moral right to hunt animals. On the other hand, non-aboriginal people are occasionally prohibited from hunting a particular species of animal in many societies. The question then arises: (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
Critical Animal Studies
  1. Le partage du monde: Husserl et la constitution des animaux comme « autres moi ».Christiane Bailey - 2013 - Chiasmi International 15:219-250.
    While phenomenologists claim to have overcome solipsism, most have not pushed beyond the boundaries of individual human intersubjectivity to that of individuals of other species. Yet Husserl recognizes the existence of an interspecific intersubjectivity, an intersubjectivity beyond the limits of the species. He even goes so far as to say that we sometimes understand a companion animal better than a foreign human. However, even if he admits that many animals are capable of a life of subjective consciousness and live in (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Marx on Humans and Animals.Ted Benton - 1984 - In Sean Sayers & Peter Osborne (eds.), Socialism, Feminism, and Philosophy: A Radical Philosophy Reader. Routledge. pp. 235.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Encountering the Animal Other: Reflections on Moments of Empathic Seeing.Scott D. Churchill - 2006 - Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 6 (sup1):1-13.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. The Animal Inside: Essays at the Intersection of Philosophical Anthropology and Animal Studies.Geoffrey Dierckxsens, Rudmer Bijlsma, Michael Begun & Thomas Kiefer (eds.) - 2016 - Rowman & Littlefield International.
    A team of renowned philosophers and a new generation of thinkers come together to offer the first book-length examination of the relationship between philosophical anthropology and animal studies.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Why Do We Go to the Zoo?: Communication, Animals, and the Cultural-Historical Experience of Zoos.Erik A. Garrett - 2013 - Fairleigh Dickinson University Press.
    This book is a phenomenological investigation of the zoo visit experience. Why Do We Go to the Zoo? is rooted in Husserlian phenomenology and focuses on the communicative interactions between humans and animals in the zoo setting.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Der Mensch, das Tier. [REVIEW]Kristin Hagen - 2011 - Philosophische Rundschau 58 (2):139 - 157.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Between Explanation and Understanding: Hermeneutical Circles, Animal Minds and Internal Causes of Behavior.A. M. Karremans & P. Sleurink - unknown
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. Why Was Thomas A. Sebeok Not a Cognitive Ethologist? From “Animal Mind” to “Semiotic Self”.Timo Maran - 2010 - Biosemiotics 3 (3):315-329.
    In the current debates about zoosemiotics its relations with the neighbouring disciplines are a relevant topic. The present article aims to analyse the complex relations between zoosemiotics and cognitive ethology with special attention to their establishers: Thomas A. Sebeok and Donald R. Griffin. It is argued that zoosemiotics and cognitive ethology have common roots in comparative studies of animal communication in the early 1960s. For supporting this claim Sebeok’s works are analysed, the classical and philosophical periods of his zoosemiotic views (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  9. The Birth of the Herd.Dimitrij Mlekuž - 2013 - Society and Animals 21 (2):150-161.
    One of the most significant contributions of archaeology to the studies of human-animal relations is the concept of the “domestication” of non-human animals. Domestication is often seen as a specific human-animal relation that explains the ways people and animals interact. However, I argue, that “domestication” does not explain anything but has to be explained or “reassembled” by focusing on the many historically specific ways human and animals live together. Thus, the paper tackles the emergence of a “herd”, an assembly of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Domesticating Animals: Description of a Certain Disturbance.Szymon Wróbel - 2014 - Dialogue and Universalism 24 (1):173-191.
    In my text, I ask—investigating mainly the works of Freud, Lévi-Strauss, and Kafka—if humanity empowered by kinship or even contamination with other species would be a sick society, frail and ill-selected, or whether it would rather be a society which is active and audacious, devoid of the traces of resentment towards other living beings. I analyze the mono-individual species on the basis of examples which are clinical , literary , and also those borrowed from mass culture in order to illustrate (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. From Blubber and Baleen to Buddha of the Deep: The Rise of the Metaphysical Whale.Frank Zelko - 2012 - Society and Animals 20 (1):91-108.
    Human attitudes to various nonhuman animals have varied considerably\nacross cultures and throughout time. While some of our responses are\nundoubtedly instinctive and universal-a visceral fear of large\ncarnivores or the feeling of spontaneous warmth for creatures exhibiting\nhigh degrees of neoteny-it is clear that our attitude toward specific\nspecies is largely shaped by our innate anthropomorphism: that is, when\nwe think about animals, we are also thinking about ourselves. There are\nfew better examples of this than the shifting attitudes toward whales\nand dolphins throughout the 20th century, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
Non-Human Animals, Misc
  1. A History of Animal Welfare Science.Donald Broom - 2011 - Acta Biotheoretica 59 (2):121-137.
    Human attitudes to animals have changed as non-humans have become more widely incorporated in the category of moral agents who deserve some respect. Parallels between the functioning of humans and non-humans have been made for thousands of years but the idea that the animals that we keep can suffer has spread recently. An improved understanding of motivation, cognition and the complexity of social behaviour in animals has led in the last 30 years to the rapid development of animal welfare science. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  2. Man is a Swarm Animal.Justin Clemens - 2009 - In Dominiek Hoens, Sigi Jottkandt & Gert Buelens (eds.), The Catastrophic Imperative: Subjectivity, Time and Memory in Contemporary Thought. Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Husserl e la questione uomo/animale.Carmine Di Martino - 2012 - Nóema 3:1-34.
    Nell’agenda della fenomenologia non figura la questione uomo- animale. E tuttavia nell’ultima fase della sua riflessione Husserl ha ripetutamente affrontato il tema, nell’ottica di una analisi fenomenologico-trascendentale della costituzione del mondo umano. La fenomenologia husserliana si mostra come una via per interrogare, in maniera non ideologica, a partire dall’esperienza del mondo della vita, i problemi della animalità e dell’umanità, per ripensare differenze e continuità.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Review of Victoria Braithwaite's „Do Fish Feel Pain?“. [REVIEW]S. Benjamin Fink - 2010 - Metapsychology 14 (34).
  5. Book Review: The Open: Man and Animal. [REVIEW]Dienstag Joshua Foa - 2006 - Political Theory 34 (1):148-152.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. The Persistent Progression: A Third View on Animal Evolution.Por Francis Dov - unknown
    Abstract. Animal evolution is seen today through the dilemma of two reigning views. The first sees animal evolution as a shallow sequence of contingent accidents and catastrophic extinctions. The second ,accepting a progressive trend in this evolution, sees a hidden vitalistic or deistic force at work. I propose a third way which accepts progressivism , but considers it to be a historical consequence of directional dissipative thermodynamic processes which are acting on the globe. The animals have a crucial role in (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Attempting Animal Histories.Erica Fudge - 2011 - Society and Animals 19 (4):425-431.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 81