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Subcategories:History/traditions: Non-Human Animals
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  1. Sean Allen-Hermanson (forthcoming). Companion to the Philosophy of Animal Minds. Routledge.
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  2. Lauren B. Alloy & Naomi Tabachnik (1984). Assessment of Covariation by Humans and Animals: The Joint Influence of Prior Expectations and Current Situational Information. Psychological Review 91 (1):112-149.
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  3. Kristin Andrews & Jacob Beck (eds.) (2017). The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Animal Minds. Routledge.
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  4. Reuben M. Baron & Stephen P. Needel (1980). Toward an Understanding of the Differences in the Responses of Humans and Other Animals to Density. Psychological Review 87 (3):320-326.
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  5. Burkhardt (1982). The Origins and Rise of Ethology: The Science of the Natural Behavior of AnimalsW. H. Thorpe. Isis 73 (1):123-124.
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  6. H. A. Carr (1927). The Interpretation of the Animal Mind. Psychological Review 34 (2):87-106.
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  7. I. D. Chase & T. H. DeWitt (1988). Vacancy Chains: A Process of Mobility to New Resources in Humans and Other Animals. Social Science Information 27 (1):83-98.
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  8. Scott D. Churchill (2006). Encountering the Animal Other: Reflections on Moments of Empathic Seeing. Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 6 (sup1):1-13.
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  9. Alice Crary (2016). 3. More on Animal Minds: Dogs and Concepts. In Inside Ethics: On the Demands of Moral Thought. Harvard University Press. pp. 92-120.
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  10. L. Cronk (2005). The Application of Animal Signaling Theory to Human Phenomena: Some Thoughts and Clarifications. Social Science Information 44 (4):603-620.
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  11. Marian Stamp Dawkins (1999). Through Our Eyes Only?: The Search for Animal Consciousness. Oxford University Press UK.
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  12. Richard Dawkins, Why Don't Animals Have Wheels?
    Whenever humans have a good idea, zoologists have grown accustomed to finding it anticipated in the animal kingdom.. Why not the wheel? Bats and dolphins perfected sophisticated echo-ranging systems millions of years before human engineers gave us sonar and..
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  13. Geoffrey Dierckxsens, Rudmer Bijlsma, Michael Begun & Thomas Kiefer (eds.) (2016). The Animal Inside: Essays at the Intersection of Philosophical Anthropology and Animal Studies. Rowman & Littlefield International.
    A team of renowned philosophers and a new generation of thinkers come together to offer the first book-length examination of the relationship between philosophical anthropology and animal studies.
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  14. Vanessa O. Ezenwa & Allison E. Williams (2014). Microbes and Animal Olfactory Communication: Where Do We Go From Here? Bioessays 36 (9):847-854.
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  15. M. F. (1998). `The Complete Biography of Every Animal': Ants, Bees, and Humanity in Nineteenth-Century England. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 29 (2):249-267.
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  16. David Allan Feller (2009). Dog Fight: Darwin as Animal Advocate in the Antivivisection Controversy of 1875. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 40 (4):265-271.
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  17. F. W. Finger (1945). Abnormal Animal Behavior and Conflict. Psychological Review 52 (4):230-233.
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  18. Michael A. Fox, Book Review of Animal Factories. [REVIEW]
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  19. Jonathan L. Freedman (1980). Responses of Humans and Other Animals to Variations in Density. Psychological Review 87 (3):327-328.
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  20. Jonathan L. Freedman (1979). Reconciling Apparent Differences Between the Responses of Humans and Other Animals to Crowding. Psychological Review 86 (1):80-85.
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  21. Erica Fudge (1999). Perceiving Animals: Humans and Beasts in Early Modern English Culture. University of Illinois Press.
    When the human understanding of beasts in the past is studied, what are revealed is not only the foundations of our own perception of animals, but humans contemplating their own status. This book argues that what is revealed in a wide range of writing from the early modern period is a recurring attempt to separate the human from the beast. Looking at the representation of the animal in the law, religious writings, literary representation, science and political ideas, what emerges is (...)
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  22. Erik A. Garrett (2015). Why Do We Go to the Zoo?: Communication, Animals, and the Cultural-Historical Experience of Zoos. Fairleigh Dickinson University Press.
    This book is a phenomenological investigation of the zoo visit experience. Why Do We Go to the Zoo? is rooted in Husserlian phenomenology and focuses on the communicative interactions between humans and animals in the zoo setting.
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  23. Hans Johann Glock, Animal Agency.
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  24. Lindsay Granshaw (1982). Reckoning with the Beast: Animals, Pain, and Humanity in the Victorian MindJames Turner. Isis 73 (2):321-322.
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  25. F. H. Heinemann (1954). Man, The Believing Animal. Hibbert Journal 53:51.
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  26. No Authorship Indicated (1895). A Description of the Cerebral Convolutions of the Chimpanzee Known as "Sally"; with Notes on the Convolutions of Other Chimpanzees and of Two Orangs. Psychological Review 2 (2):195-196.
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  27. Jessica Isserow (2015). Empathy and Morality. Biology and Philosophy 30 (4):597-608.
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  28. N. Itoigawa (1978). 13. Animal Social Psychology. Social Science Information 17 (4-5):682-685.
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  29. Kristin Andrews Jacob Beck (ed.) (forthcoming). Routledge Handbook for the Philosophy of Animal Minds. Routledge.
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  30. Thomas Johnson (2015). Kristin Andrews. The Animal Mind: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Animal Cognition. Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 35 (3):124-126.
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  31. W. N. Kellogg (1949). 'Superstitious' Behavior in Animals. Psychological Review 56 (3):172-175.
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  32. Hilary Kornblith (1999). Knowledge in Humans and Other Animals. Noûs 33 (s13):327-346.
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  33. Christine M. Korsgaard (2009). Facing the Animal You See in the Mirror. The Harvard Review of Philosophy 16 (1):4-9.
  34. S. Krief (2006). Diversity of Items of Low Nutritional Value Ingested by Chimpanzees From Kanyawara, Kibale National Park, Uganda: An Example of the Etho-Ethnology of Chimpanzees. Social Science Information 45 (2):227-263.
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  35. Sofie Lachapelle & Jenna Healey (2010). On Hans, Zou and the Others: Wonder Animals and the Question of Animal Intelligence in Early Twentieth-Century France. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 41 (1):12-20.
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  36. Susan E. Lederer (2000). Images of Animals: Anthropomorphism and Animal MindEileen CristHumans and Other AnimalsArien Mack. Isis 91 (4):834-835.
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  37. Andrew Linzey (2013). Why Animal Suffering Matters: Philosophy, Theology, and Practical Ethics. Oup Usa.
    In this superbly argued and deeply engaging book, Andrew Linzey not only shows that animals can and do suffer but also that many of the justifications for inflicting animal suffering in fact provide grounds for protecting them.
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  38. Nikos Logothetis, Myocardial and Cerebral Perfusion Studies in Animal Models.
    In-vivo phenotyping of genetically engineered mouse models for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is established by combining BT-MRI and CASL G. Vanhoutte1, E. Storkebaum2, P. Carmeliet2, A. Van der Linden1.
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  39. Nelly Mäekivi (2016). Modelling Ex Situ Animal Behaviour and Communication. Biosemiotics 9 (2):207-226.
    Communication and behaviour of animals living ex situ has been one of the major sources of knowledge about wild animals. Nevertheless, it is also acknowledged that depending on the environment that the animals inhabit, there are differences in their communication and behaviour. With some species it is difficult to reproduce their natural environment to an extent that excludes deviations from the behaviour and communication exhibited by animals living in situ. In zoological gardens, welfare measures are introduced in order to counteract (...)
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  40. Tom McClelland, Review of Can Animals Be Moral? By Rowlands, M. [REVIEW]
    In this vivid and engaging book Mark Rowlands asks whether animals are capable of being moral. His answer is a mitigated 'yes', supported by an ambitious and convincing philosophical argument. A great deal of attention has been given to the question of whether animals deserve our moral consideration. Much less has been given to the question of whether animals themselves are moral beings. The dominant view among both philosophers and scientists has been that they are not. The standard position is (...)
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  41. Caroline Meline (2014). Human and Animal Minds: Against the Discontinuity Thesis. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 21 (2):39-51.
    Are animals and humans different in kind or only different in degree when it comes to the mental springs of behavior? The source of this question is Charles Darwin's 1871 The Descent of Man, in which he argued for a difference in degree between animals and humans in mental abilities, rather than a difference in kind. Darwin's opponents in the ensuing debate were theologians and scientific traditionalists who insisted upon human specialness when it came to the mind,even if evolution held (...)
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  42. Wesley Mills (1901). Animal Behaviour. Psychological Review 8 (3):299-304.
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  43. James A. Nelson, Article Review of Are Animals Moral Beings?, A Critique of Personhood, Must We Value Life to Have a Right to It?, Ethics & Animals.
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  44. Martha Nussbaum & Richard Sorabji (1996). Animal Minds and Human Morals: The Origins of the Western Debate. Philosophical Review 105 (3):403.
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  45. Sagar A. Pandit, Gauri R. Pradhan, Hennadii Balashov & Carel P. Van Schaik (forthcoming). The Conditions Favoring Between-Community Raiding in Chimpanzees, Bonobos, and Human Foragers. Human Nature.
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  46. Jaak Panksepp (2003). Can Anthropomorphic Analyses of Separation Cries in Other Animals Inform Us About the Emotional Nature of Social Loss in Humans? Comment on Blumberg and Sokoloff. Psychological Review 110 (2):376-388.
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  47. Daisie Radner (1993). Directed Action and Animal Communication. Ratio 6 (2):135-154.
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  48. Ina Roy‐Faderman (2015). The Alienation of Humans and Animals in Uplift Fiction. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 39 (1):78-97.
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  49. Eric Saidel (2016). Through the Looking Glass, and What We Find There. Biology and Philosophy 31 (3):335-352.
    The conclusions drawn from mirror self-recognition studies, in which nonhuman animals are tested for whether they detect a mark on their bodies which can be observed only in the mirror, are based on several presuppositions. These include that performance on the test is an indication of species wide rather than individual abilities, and that all the animals which pass the test are demonstrating the presence of the same psychological ability. However, further details about the results of the test indicate that (...)
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  50. S. F. Sapontzis, Book Review of Animal Thought. [REVIEW]
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1 — 50 / 92