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  1. Deleuze's Larval Subject and the Question of Bodily TIme.Tano S. Posteraro - forthcoming - Symposium: Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy/Revue canadienne de philosophie continentale.
    This paper treats Deleuze's first synthesis of time and the corresponding concept of larval subjectivity by routing it through a biophilosophy of organism. I develop, out of my reading of Deleuze, a temporal concept of organismic subjectivity.
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  2. Anna Marie Roos. Goldfish. (Animal.) 206 Pp., Refs., Bibl., Index. London: Reaktion Books, 2019. £12.95 (Paper); ISBN 9781789141351. [REVIEW]Lijing Jiang - 2021 - Isis 112 (1):171-173.
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  3. Minds Without Spines: Evolutionarily Inclusive Animal Ethics.Irina Mikhalevich - 2020 - Animal Sentience 29 (1).
    Invertebrate animals are frequently lumped into a single category and denied welfare protections despite their considerable cognitive, behavioral, and evolutionary diversity. Some ethical and policy inroads have been made for cephalopod molluscs and crustaceans, but the vast majority of arthropods, including the insects, remain excluded from moral consideration. We argue that this exclusion is unwarranted given the existing evidence. Anachronistic readings of evolution, which view invertebrates as lower in the scala naturae, continue to influence public policy and common morality. The (...)
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  4. Is Vegetarianism Healthy for Children?Nathan Cofnas - 2019 - Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition 59 (13):2052-2060.
    According to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics’ influential position statement on vegetarianism, meat and seafood can be replaced with milk, soy/legumes, and eggs without any negative effects in children. The United States Department of Agriculture endorses a similar view. The present paper argues that the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics ignores or gives short shrift to direct and indirect evidence that vegetarianism may be associated with serious risks for brain and body development in fetuses and children. Regular supplementation with (...)
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  5. Approaching Other Animals with Caution: Exploring Insights From Aquinas's Psychology.Daniel D. De Haan - 2019 - New Blackfriars 100 (1090):715-737.
    In this essay I explore the resources Thomas Aquinas provides for enquiries concerning the psychological abilities of nonhuman animals. I first look to Aquinas’s account of divine, angelic, human, and nonhuman animal naming, to help us articulate the contours of a ‘critical anthropocentrism’ that aims to steer clear of the mistakes of a na¨ıve anthropocentrism and misconceived avowals to entirely eschew anthropocentrism. I then address the need for our critical anthropocentrism both to reject the mental-physical dichotomy endorsed by ‘folk psychology’ (...)
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  6. À Corps: The Corpus of Deconstruction.Thomas Clément Mercier - 2019 - Parallax 25 (2):111-118.
    This article pursues the exploration of how contemporary works of deconstruction can challenge preconceptions of the body and embodiments and interrogate their limits, particularly in relation to intertwined foldings of desire, gender, race and sexuality. Through readings of Jacques Derrida and Sarah Kofman, the authors show that deconstruction allows for an understanding of the body or bodies that goes beyond the present body — indexed as human, male, white, able, living body — thus opening up towards the thinking of bodies (...)
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  7. Institution as the Model of Meaning: Gehlen and Merleau-Ponty on the Question of Anthropology.Jiří Klouda & Jan Halák - 2018 - Filosoficky Casopis 66 (6):869-888.
    [This paper is written in Czech language.] The aim of the article is to re-evaluate the still-surviving anthropological trope which, in reaction to an inquiry into the essence of man, compares humans with animals and points to culture as the means by which humans complete their “deficient” nature. This motif contrasting humans with animals has been extended by A. Gehlen who characterises humans as “beings of deficiencies”. In his view, the morphological-instinctive insufficiency of the human being must be stabilised by (...)
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  8. Dignity and Animals. Does It Make Sense to Apply the Concept of Dignity to All Sentient Beings?Federico Zuolo - 2016 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 19 (5):1117-1130.
    Although the idea of dignity has always been applied to human beings and although its role is far from being uncontroversial, some recent works in animal ethics have tried to apply the idea of dignity to animals. The aim of this paper is to discuss critically whether these attempts are convincing and sensible. In order to assess these proposals, I put forward two formal conditions that any conception of dignity must meet and outline three main approaches which might justify the (...)
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  9. The Alienation of Humans and Animals in Uplift Fiction.Ina Roy-Faderman - 2015 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 39 (1):78-97.
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  10. Organismic Spatiality: Toward a Metaphysic of Composition.Tano S. Posteraro - 2014 - Environment and Planning D 32 (4):739-752.
  11. On the Utility of Virtuality for Relating Abilities and Affordances.Tano S. Posteraro - 2014 - Ecological Psychology 26 (4):353-367.
  12. Evolutionary origin of emotions: Continuity between animals and humans.Zorana Todorovic - 2014 - Glasnik Za Društvene Nauke 6 (2014):45-62.
    This paper discusses the evolutionary origin and adaptive functions of emotions, in line with contemporary evolutionary psychology. Drawing upon Charles Darwin’s study of emotional expressions, it is argued that there is an evolutionary continuity among animals in emotional capacities, and that the differences between humans and animals are differences in degree and not in kind. The focus is on basic or primary emotions (joy, fear, sadness, anger), as it has been consistently shown that they are universal and shared among many (...)
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  13. Communication and Common Interest.Peter Godfrey-Smith & Manolo Martínez - 2013 - PLOS Computational Biology 9 (11):1–6.
    Explaining the maintenance of communicative behavior in the face of incentives to deceive, conceal information, or exaggerate is an important problem in behavioral biology. When the interests of agents diverge, some form of signal cost is often seen as essential to maintaining honesty. Here, novel computational methods are used to investigate the role of common interest between the sender and receiver of messages in maintaining cost-free informative signaling in a signaling game. Two measures of common interest are defined. These quantify (...)
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  14. Critical Theory and the “Animal Question”.Marco Maurizi - 2013 - Society and Animals 21 (5):489-493.
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  15. Critical Animal Studies: An Introduction.Dawne McCance - 2013 - State University of New York Press.
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  16. Animal Studies: An Introduction.Paul Waldau - 2013 - Oup Usa.
    Animal studies is a growing interdisciplinary field which seeks to understand how humans study and conceive of other-than-human animals, and how these conceptions have changed over time, across cultures, and among various scholarly modes of inquiry. Until now, this growing field has lacked a comprehensive introductory text appropriate for new scholars. Animal Studies: An Introduction fills this deficiency, providing the first holistic survey of the field.
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  17. Husserl e la questione uomo/animale.Carmine Di Martino - 2012 - Nóema 3:1-34.
    Nell’agenda della fenomenologia non figura la questione uomo- animale. E tuttavia nell’ultima fase della sua riflessione Husserl ha ripetutamente affrontato il tema, nell’ottica di una analisi fenomenologico-trascendentale della costituzione del mondo umano. La fenomenologia husserliana si mostra come una via per interrogare, in maniera non ideologica, a partire dall’esperienza del mondo della vita, i problemi della animalità e dell’umanità, per ripensare differenze e continuità.
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  18. Mechanizing the Sensitive Soul.Gary Hatfield - 2012 - In Gideon Manning (ed.), Matter and Form in Early Modern Science and Philosophy. Brill. pp. 151–86.
    Descartes set for himself the ambitious program of accounting for the functions of the Aristotelian vegetative and sensitive souls without invoking souls or the faculties or powers of souls in his explanations. He rejects the notion that the soul is hylomorphically present in the organs of the body so as to carry out vital and sensory functions. Rather, the body’s organs operate in a purely mechanical fashion. That is what is involved in “mechanizing” these phenomena. The role of the soul (...)
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  19. Beyond Assimilationism and Differentialism: Comment on Glock.Geert Keil - 2012 - In Elif Özmen & Julian Nida-Rümelin (eds.), Welt der Gründe. Meiner.
    In a number of articles, Hans-Johann Glock has argued against the »lingualist« view that higher mental capacities are a prerogative of language-users. He has defended the »assimilationist« claim that the mental capacities of humans and of non-human animals differ only in degree. In the paper under discussion, Glock argues that animals are capable of acting for reasons, provided that reasons are construed along the lines of the new »objectivist« theory of practical reasons. The paper critizices these views.
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  20. A History of Animal Welfare Science.Donald M. Broom - 2011 - Acta Biotheoretica 59 (2):121-137.
    Human attitudes to animals have changed as non-humans have become more widely incorporated in the category of moral agents who deserve some respect. Parallels between the functioning of humans and non-humans have been made for thousands of years but the idea that the animals that we keep can suffer has spread recently. An improved understanding of motivation, cognition and the complexity of social behaviour in animals has led in the last 30 years to the rapid development of animal welfare science. (...)
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  21. Attempting Animal Histories.Erica Fudge - 2011 - Society and Animals 19 (4):425-431.
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  22. Liability for Animals: An Historico-Structural Comparison. [REVIEW]Bernard S. Jackson - 2011 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 24 (3):259-289.
    This account of civil liability for animals in a range of ancient, mediaeval and modern legal systems (based on a series of studies conducted early in my career: (s.1)) uses semiotic analysis to supplement the insights of conventional legal history, thus balancing diachronic and synchronic approaches. It reinforces the conventional historical sensitivity to anachronism in two respects: (1) (logical) inference of underlying values from concrete rules (rather than attending to literary features of the text) manifests cognitive anachronism, an issue manifest (...)
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  23. Animals, Equality and Democracy.Siobhan O'Sullivan - 2011 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Machine generated contents note: -- Series Editors' Foreword -- Preface by Prof. Robert Garner, University of Leicester, UK -- Introduction: Where are all the Animals? -- Animal Citizens -- The Political Lives of Animals -- Animal Invisibility -- Out of Sight, Out of Mind -- Applying the Justice Principle to Animal Citizens -- Conclusion -- References -- Index.
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  24. Two Lessons on Animal and Man.Gilbert Simondon - 2011 - Univocal Publishing.
    Gilbert Simondon was a French philosopher of technology best known for his theory of individuation through transduction in a metastable environment. Simondon's work has been championed by thinkers such as Gille Deleuze and continues to attract new interest within a variety of academic fields.
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  25. Review of Victoria Braithwaite's „Do Fish Feel Pain?“. [REVIEW]S. Benjamin Fink - 2010 - Metapsychology 14 (34).
  26. From Panexperientialism to Conscious Experience: The Continuum of Experience.Gregory M. Nixon - 2010 - Journal of Consciousness Exploration and Research 1 (3):216-233.
    When so much is being written on conscious experience, it is past time to face the question whether experience happens that is not conscious of itself. The recognition that we and most other living things experience non-consciously has recently been firmly supported by experimental science, clinical studies, and theoretic investigations; the related if not identical philosophic notion of experience without a subject has a rich pedigree. Leaving aside the question of how experience could become conscious of itself, I aim here (...)
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  27. Man is a Swarm Animal.Justin Clemens - 2009 - In Dominiek Hoens, Sigi Jottkandt & Gert Buelens (eds.), The Catastrophic Imperative: Subjectivity, Time and Memory in Contemporary Thought. Palgrave-Macmillan.
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  28. Rationalist Roots of Modern Psychology.Gary Hatfield - 2009 - In John Symons & Paco Calvo (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Psychology. Routledge. pp. 3--21.
    The philosophers René Descartes (1596–1650), Nicolas Malebranche (1638–1715), Benedict Spinoza (1632–77), and Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (1646–1716) are grouped together as rationalists because they held that human beings possess a faculty of reason that produces knowledge independently of the senses. In this regard, they contrast with empiricist philosophers, such as John Locke and David Hume, who believed that all knowledge arises from the senses. The rationalists contended that proper use of reason would yield the first principles of metaphysics, the most basic (...)
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  29. Catalina. Inteligencia Animal En Aristóteles.G. López - 2009 - Discusiones Filosóficas 10 (15):69-81.
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  30. Animals.Gary Hatfield - 2008 - In Janet Broughton & John Carriero (eds.), Companion to Descartes. Blackwell. pp. 404–425.
    This chapter considers philosophical problems concerning non-human (and sometimes human) animals, including their metaphysical, physical, and moral status, their origin, what makes them alive, their functional organization, and the basis of their sensitive and cognitive capacities. I proceed by assuming what most of Descartes’s followers and interpreters have held: that Descartes proposed that animals lack sentience, feeling, and genuinely cognitive representations of things. (Some scholars interpret Descartes differently, denying that he excluded sentience, feeling, and representation from animals, and I consider (...)
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  31. Rat. Animal Series. [REVIEW]Tania Munz - 2008 - British Journal for the History of Science 41 (3):445-447.
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  32. Beast or God? – The Intermediate Status of Humans and the Physical Basis of the Stoic Scala Naturae.Jula Wildberger - 2008 - In Annetta Alexandridis, Lorenz Winkler-Horacek & Markus Wild (eds.), Mensch und Tier in der Antike. Wiesbaden: Reichert. pp. 47-70.
    Argues that the demarcation between humans and animals in Stoicism is made in functional terms, by their different capacities, but also quantitative terms, as smaller or larger shares of pneuma and thus the active principle Gods. Discusses how they Stoics may have related these two categories and makes a case for the possibility to formulate a non-exploitative animal ethic in Stoic terms.
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  33. Living with Animals: Snakes and Humans.H. Marcum - 2007 - In M. Bekoff (ed.), Encyclopedia of Human-Animal Relationships. Greenwood Press. pp. 1181--1184.
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  34. A Comprehensive Animal Series.Robert McKay - 2007 - Society and Animals 15 (2):203-205.
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  35. Dumb Beasts and Dead Philosophers: Humanity and the Humane in Ancient Philosophy and Literature.Catherine Osborne - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    The book is about three things. First, how Ancient thinkers perceived humans as like or unlike other animals; second about the justification for taking a humane attitude towards natural things; and third about how moral claims count as true, and how they can be discovered or acquired. Was Aristotle was right to see continuity in the psychological functions of animal and human souls? The question cannot be settled without taking a moral stance. As we can either focus on continuity or (...)
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  36. Animal Mirrors: Poe, Lacan, von Uexküll, and Audubon in the Zoosemiosphere.Michael Ziser - 2007 - Angelaki 12 (3):11 – 33.
  37. Book Review: The Open: Man and Animal. [REVIEW]Dienstag Joshua Foa - 2006 - Political Theory 34 (1):148-152.
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  38. Rod Preece, Brute Souls, Happy Beasts, and Evolution: The Historical Status of Animals Reviewed By.Angus Taylor - 2006 - Philosophy in Review 26 (3):219-221.
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  39. Erica Fudge. Perceiving 'Animals: Humans and Beasts in Early Modem English Culture'.P. Lee - 2005 - Early Science and Medicine 10 (3):447.
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  40. Are Animals Just Noisy Machines?: Louis Boutan and the Co-Invention of Animal and Child Psychology in the French Third Republic.Marion Thomas - 2005 - Journal of the History of Biology 38 (3):425-460.
    Historians of science have only just begun to sample the wealth of different approaches to the study of animal behavior undertaken in the twentieth century. To date, more attention has been given to Lorenzian ethology and American behaviorism than to other work and traditions, but different approaches are equally worthy of the historian's attention, reflecting not only the broader range of questions that could be asked about animal behavior and the "animal mind" but also the different contexts in which these (...)
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  41. A Concise History Of Ornithology. [REVIEW]Paul Fisher - 2004 - Isis 95:105-105.
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  42. The Ideological Animal.John T. Jost, Gráinne Fitzsimons & Aaron C. Kay - 2004 - In Jeff Greenberg, Sander L. Koole & Tom Pyszczynski (eds.), Handbook of Experimental Existential Psychology. Guilford Press. pp. 263--283.
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  43. The Open: Man and Animal. [REVIEW]Michael O’Sullivan - 2004 - Radical Philosophy 128.
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  44. Electric Animal: Toward a Rhetoric of Wildlife.Akira Mizuta Lippit - 2000 - U of Minnesota Press.
    Differentiation from animals helped to establish the notion of a human being, but the disappearance of animals now threatens that identity. This is the argument underlying Electric Animal, a probing exploration of the figure of the animal in modern culture. Akira Mizuta Lippit shows us the animal as a crucial figure in the definition of modernity -- essential to developments in the natural sciences and technology, radical transformations in modern philosophy and literature, and the advent of psychoanalysis and the cinema. (...)
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  45. New Presbyter or Old Priest? Reconsidering Zoological Taxonomy in Britain, 1750—1840.Harriet Ritvo - 1990 - History of the Human Sciences 3 (2):259-276.
  46. Bibliography of the Rhinoceros: An Analysis of the Literature on the Recent Rhinoceroses in Culture, History, and Biology by L. C. Rookmaaker. [REVIEW]Janet Browns - 1984 - Isis 75:569-569.
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  47. Attitudes Toward Nature in Medieval England: The Alphonso and Bird Psalters.G. Hutchinson - 1974 - Isis 65:5-37.
  48. The Anatomy of the Gorilla by William King Gregory. [REVIEW]G. Erikson - 1952 - Isis 43:81-83.
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  49. Bibliography of Dr E. W. Gudger's Contributions to the History of Ichthyology.George Sarton - 1951 - Isis 42:237-242.
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  50. Review of Jennison, Animals for Show and Pleasure. [REVIEW]D'Arcy W. Thompson - 1938 - The Classical Review 52 (2):77-77.
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