Related categories
Subcategories:History/traditions: Non-Human Animals

58 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 58
Material to categorize
  1. Animal Moral Psychologies.Susana Monsó & Kristin Andrews - forthcoming - In John M. Doris & Manuel Vargas (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Moral Psychology. New York: Oxford University Press.
    Observations of animals engaging in apparently moral behavior have led academics and the public alike to ask whether morality is shared between humans and other animals. Some philosophers explicitly argue that morality is unique to humans, because moral agency requires capacities that are only demonstrated in our species. Other philosophers argue that some animals can participate in morality because they possess these capacities in a rudimentary form. Scientists have also joined the discussion, and their views are just as varied as (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Animal Lessons. [REVIEW]Bronwyn Singleton - 2011 - Symposium 15 (1):241-245.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Reckoning with the Beast: Animals, Pain, and Humanity in the Victorian Mind. James Turner.Lindsay Granshaw - 1982 - Isis 73 (2):321-322.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Animal Lifestyles and Anatomies: The Case of the Prosimian Primates.Russell H. Tuttle - 1991 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 34 (4):617-618.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Man, The Believing Animal.F. H. Heinemann - 1954 - Hibbert Journal 53:51.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Descartes' Bête Machine, the Leibnizian Correction and Religious Influence.John Voelpel - unknown
    René Descartes’ 1637 “bête machine” characterization of nonhuman animals has assisted in the strengthening of the Genesis 1:26 and 1: 28 disparate categorization of nonhuman animals and human animals. That characterization appeared in Descartes’ first important published writing, the Discourse on the Method, and can be summarized as including the ideas that nonhuman animals are like machines; do not have thoughts, reason or souls like human animals; and thus, cannot be categorized with humans; and, as a result, do not experience (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Reply to Dale Jamieson and Marc Bekoff.Kenneth Joel Shapiro - unknown
  8. The Lion's Share.Ian Ground & Michael Bavidge - forthcoming - The Philosopher.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
Critical Animal Studies
  1. From the Hiatus Model to the Diffuse Discontinuities: A Turning Point in Human-Animal Studies.Carlo Brentari - 2018 - Biosemiotics 11 (3):331-345.
    In twentieth-century continental philosophy, German philosophical anthropology can be seen as a sort of conceptual laboratory devoted to human/animal research, and, in particular, to the discontinuity between human and non-human animals. Its main notion—the idea of the special position of humans in nature—is one of the first philosophical attempts to think of the specificity of humans as a natural and qualitative difference from non-human animals. This school of thought correctly rejects both the metaphysical and/or religious characterisations of humans, and the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Le partage du monde: Husserl et la constitution des animaux comme « autres moi ».Christiane Bailey - 2013 - Chiasmi International 15:219-250.
    While phenomenologists claim to have overcome solipsism, most have not pushed beyond the boundaries of individual human intersubjectivity to that of individuals of other species. Yet Husserl recognizes the existence of an interspecific intersubjectivity, an intersubjectivity beyond the limits of the species. He even goes so far as to say that we sometimes understand a companion animal better than a foreign human. However, even if he admits that many animals are capable of a life of subjective consciousness and live in (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Encountering the Animal Other: Reflections on Moments of Empathic Seeing.Scott D. Churchill - 2006 - Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 6 (sup1):1-13.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  4. The Animal Inside: Essays at the Intersection of Philosophical Anthropology and Animal Studies.Geoffrey Dierckxsens, Rudmer Bijlsma, Michael Begun & Thomas Kiefer (eds.) - 2016 - Rowman & Littlefield International.
    A team of renowned philosophers and a new generation of thinkers come together to offer the first book-length examination of the relationship between philosophical anthropology and animal studies.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Domesticating Animals: Description of a Certain Disturbance.Szymon Wróbel - 2014 - Dialogue and Universalism 24 (1):173-191.
    In my text, I ask—investigating mainly the works of Freud, Lévi-Strauss, and Kafka—if humanity empowered by kinship or even contamination with other species would be a sick society, frail and ill-selected, or whether it would rather be a society which is active and audacious, devoid of the traces of resentment towards other living beings. I analyze the mono-individual species on the basis of examples which are clinical , literary , and also those borrowed from mass culture in order to illustrate (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Why Do We Go to the Zoo?: Communication, Animals, and the Cultural-Historical Experience of Zoos.Erik A. Garrett - 2013 - Fairleigh Dickinson University Press.
    This book is a phenomenological investigation of the zoo visit experience. Why Do We Go to the Zoo? is rooted in Husserlian phenomenology and focuses on the communicative interactions between humans and animals in the zoo setting.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Marx on Humans and Animals.Ted Benton - 1984 - In Sean Sayers & Peter Osborne (eds.), Socialism, Feminism, and Philosophy: A Radical Philosophy Reader. Routledge. pp. 235.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. The Birth of the Herd.Dimitrij Mlekuž - 2013 - Society and Animals 21 (2):150-161.
    One of the most significant contributions of archaeology to the studies of human-animal relations is the concept of the “domestication” of non-human animals. Domestication is often seen as a specific human-animal relation that explains the ways people and animals interact. However, I argue, that “domestication” does not explain anything but has to be explained or “reassembled” by focusing on the many historically specific ways human and animals live together. Thus, the paper tackles the emergence of a “herd”, an assembly of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Der Mensch, das Tier. [REVIEW]Kristin Hagen - 2011 - Philosophische Rundschau 58 (2):139 - 157.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Why Was Thomas A. Sebeok Not a Cognitive Ethologist? From “Animal Mind” to “Semiotic Self”.Timo Maran - 2010 - Biosemiotics 3 (3):315-329.
    In the current debates about zoosemiotics its relations with the neighbouring disciplines are a relevant topic. The present article aims to analyse the complex relations between zoosemiotics and cognitive ethology with special attention to their establishers: Thomas A. Sebeok and Donald R. Griffin. It is argued that zoosemiotics and cognitive ethology have common roots in comparative studies of animal communication in the early 1960s. For supporting this claim Sebeok’s works are analysed, the classical and philosophical periods of his zoosemiotic views (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  11. From Blubber and Baleen to Buddha of the Deep: The Rise of the Metaphysical Whale.Frank Zelko - 2012 - Society and Animals 20 (1):91-108.
    Human attitudes to various nonhuman animals have varied considerably\nacross cultures and throughout time. While some of our responses are\nundoubtedly instinctive and universal-a visceral fear of large\ncarnivores or the feeling of spontaneous warmth for creatures exhibiting\nhigh degrees of neoteny-it is clear that our attitude toward specific\nspecies is largely shaped by our innate anthropomorphism: that is, when\nwe think about animals, we are also thinking about ourselves. There are\nfew better examples of this than the shifting attitudes toward whales\nand dolphins throughout the 20th century, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Between Explanation and Understanding: Hermeneutical Circles, Animal Minds and Internal Causes of Behavior.A. M. Karremans & P. Sleurink - unknown
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
Non-Human Animals, Misc
  1. Beast or God? – The Intermediate Status of Humans and the Physical Basis of the Stoic Scala Naturae.Jula Wildberger - 2008 - In Annetta Alexandridis, Lorenz Winkler-Horacek & Markus Wild (eds.), Mensch und Tier in der Antike. Wiesbaden: Reichert. pp. 47-70.
    Argues that the demarcation between humans and animals in Stoicism is made in functional terms, by their different capacities, but also quantitative terms, as smaller or larger shares of pneuma and thus the active principle Gods. Discusses how they Stoics may have related these two categories and makes a case for the possibility to formulate a non-exploitative animal ethic in Stoic terms.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Review of Jennison, Animals for Show and Pleasure. [REVIEW]D'Arcy W. Thompson - 1938 - The Classical Review 52 (2):77-77.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Dignity and Animals. Does It Make Sense to Apply the Concept of Dignity to All Sentient Beings?Federico Zuolo - 2016 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 19 (5):1117-1130.
    Although the idea of dignity has always been applied to human beings and although its role is far from being uncontroversial, some recent works in animal ethics have tried to apply the idea of dignity to animals. The aim of this paper is to discuss critically whether these attempts are convincing and sensible. In order to assess these proposals, I put forward two formal conditions that any conception of dignity must meet and outline three main approaches which might justify the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  4. Are Animals Just Noisy Machines?: Louis Boutan and the Co-Invention of Animal and Child Psychology in the French Third Republic.Marion Thomas - 2005 - Journal of the History of Biology 38 (3):425-460.
    Historians of science have only just begun to sample the wealth of different approaches to the study of animal behavior undertaken in the twentieth century. To date, more attention has been given to Lorenzian ethology and American behaviorism than to other work and traditions, but different approaches are equally worthy of the historian's attention, reflecting not only the broader range of questions that could be asked about animal behavior and the "animal mind" but also the different contexts in which these (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  5. The Alienation of Humans and Animals in Uplift Fiction.Ina Roy‐Faderman - 2015 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 39 (1):78-97.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Mechanizing the Sensitive Soul.Gary Hatfield - 2012 - In Gideon Manning (ed.), Matter and Form in Early Modern Science and Philosophy. Brill. pp. 151–86.
    Descartes set for himself the ambitious program of accounting for the functions of the Aristotelian vegetative and sensitive souls without invoking souls or the faculties or powers of souls in his explanations. He rejects the notion that the soul is hylomorphically present in the organs of the body so as to carry out vital and sensory functions. Rather, the body’s organs operate in a purely mechanical fashion. That is what is involved in “mechanizing” these phenomena. The role of the soul (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  7. Animals.Gary Hatfield - 2008 - In Janet Broughton & John Carriero (eds.), Companion to Descartes. Blackwell. pp. 404–425.
    This chapter considers philosophical problems concerning non-human (and sometimes human) animals, including their metaphysical, physical, and moral status, their origin, what makes them alive, their functional organization, and the basis of their sensitive and cognitive capacities. I proceed by assuming what most of Descartes’s followers and interpreters have held: that Descartes proposed that animals lack sentience, feeling, and genuinely cognitive representations of things. (Some scholars interpret Descartes differently, denying that he excluded sentience, feeling, and representation from animals, and I consider (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  8. Deleuze's Larval Subject and the Question of Bodily TIme.Tano S. Posteraro - forthcoming - Symposium: Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy/Revue canadienne de philosophie continentale.
    This paper treats Deleuze's first synthesis of time and the corresponding concept of larval subjectivity by routing it through a biophilosophy of organism. I develop, out of my reading of Deleuze, a temporal concept of organismic subjectivity.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Organismic Spatiality: Toward a Metaphysic of Composition.Tano S. Posteraro - 2014 - Environment and Planning D 32 (4):739-752.
  10. On the Utility of Virtuality for Relating Abilities and Affordances.Tano S. Posteraro - 2014 - Ecological Psychology 26 (4):353-367.
  11. The Open: Man and Animal. [REVIEW]Michael O’Sullivan - 2004 - Radical Philosophy 128.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Electric Animal Toward a Rhetoric of Wildlife.Akira Mizuta Lippit - 2000
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  13. Husserl e la questione uomo/animale.Carmine Di Martino - 2012 - Nóema 3:1-34.
    Nell’agenda della fenomenologia non figura la questione uomo- animale. E tuttavia nell’ultima fase della sua riflessione Husserl ha ripetutamente affrontato il tema, nell’ottica di una analisi fenomenologico-trascendentale della costituzione del mondo umano. La fenomenologia husserliana si mostra come una via per interrogare, in maniera non ideologica, a partire dall’esperienza del mondo della vita, i problemi della animalità e dell’umanità, per ripensare differenze e continuità.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Rat. Animal Series. [REVIEW]Tania Munz - 2008 - British Journal for the History of Science 41 (3):445-447.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Two Lessons on Animal and Man.Gilbert Simondon - 2012 - Univocal Publishing.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Erica Fudge. Perceiving 'Animals: Humans and Beasts in Early Modem English Culture'.P. Lee - 2005 - Early Science and Medicine 10 (3):447.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Book Review: The Open: Man and Animal. [REVIEW]Dienstag Joshua Foa - 2006 - Political Theory 34 (1):148-152.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Rod Preece, Brute Souls, Happy Beasts, and Evolution: The Historical Status of Animals Reviewed By.Angus Taylor - 2006 - Philosophy in Review 26 (3):219-221.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Critical Animal Studies: An Introduction.Dawne McCance - 2013 - State University of New York Press.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  20. Rationalist Roots of Modern Psychology.Gary Hatfield - 2009 - In John Symons & Paco Calvo (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Psychology. Routledge. pp. 3--21.
    The philosophers René Descartes (1596–1650), Nicolas Malebranche (1638–1715), Benedict Spinoza (1632–77), and Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (1646–1716) are grouped together as rationalists because they held that human beings possess a faculty of reason that produces knowledge independently of the senses. In this regard, they contrast with empiricist philosophers, such as John Locke and David Hume, who believed that all knowledge arises from the senses. The rationalists contended that proper use of reason would yield the first principles of metaphysics, the most basic (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  21. The Ideological Animal.John T. Jost, Gráinne Fitzsimons & Aaron C. Kay - 2004 - In Jeff Greenberg, Sander L. Koole & Tom Pyszczynski (eds.), Handbook of Experimental Existential Psychology. Guilford Press. pp. 263--283.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  22. Living with Animals: Snakes and Humans.H. Marcum - 2007 - In M. Bekoff (ed.), Encyclopedia of Human-Animal Relationships. Greenwood Press. pp. 1181--1184.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Animal Studies: An Introduction.Paul Waldau - 2013 - Oup Usa.
    Animal studies is a growing interdisciplinary field which seeks to understand how humans study and conceive of other-than-human animals, and how these conceptions have changed over time, across cultures, and among various scholarly modes of inquiry. Until now, this growing field has lacked a comprehensive introductory text appropriate for new scholars. Animal Studies: An Introduction fills this deficiency, providing the first holistic survey of the field.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. Critical Theory and the “Animal Question”.Marco Maurizi - 2013 - Society and Animals 21 (5):489-493.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. Attempting Animal Histories.Erica Fudge - 2011 - Society and Animals 19 (4):425-431.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. A Comprehensive Animal Series.Robert McKay - 2007 - Society and Animals 15 (2):203-205.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. Catalina. Inteligencia Animal En Aristóteles.G. López - 2009 - Discusiones Filosóficas 10 (15):69-81.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. Liability for Animals: An Historico-Structural Comparison. [REVIEW]Bernard S. Jackson - 2011 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 24 (3):259-289.
    This account of civil liability for animals in a range of ancient, mediaeval and modern legal systems (based on a series of studies conducted early in my career: (s.1)) uses semiotic analysis to supplement the insights of conventional legal history, thus balancing diachronic and synchronic approaches. It reinforces the conventional historical sensitivity to anachronism in two respects: (1) (logical) inference of underlying values from concrete rules (rather than attending to literary features of the text) manifests cognitive anachronism, an issue manifest (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  29. Review of Victoria Braithwaite's „Do Fish Feel Pain?“. [REVIEW]S. Benjamin Fink - 2010 - Metapsychology 14 (34).
  30. Beyond Assimilationism and Differentialism: Comment on Glock.Geert Keil - 2012 - In Elif Özmen & Julian Nida-Rümelin (eds.), Welt der Gründe. Meiner.
    In a number of articles, Hans-Johann Glock has argued against the »lingualist« view that higher mental capacities are a prerogative of language-users. He has defended the »assimilationist« claim that the mental capacities of humans and of non-human animals differ only in degree. In the paper under discussion, Glock argues that animals are capable of acting for reasons, provided that reasons are construed along the lines of the new »objectivist« theory of practical reasons. The paper critizices these views.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 58