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  1. Pretense and Pathology: Philosophical Fictionalism and its Applications.Bradley Armour-Garb & James A. Woodbridge - 2015 - Cambridge University Press.
    In this book, Bradley Armour-Garb and James A. Woodbridge distinguish various species of fictionalism, locating and defending their own version of philosophical fictionalism. Addressing semantic and philosophical puzzles that arise from ordinary language, they consider such issues as the problem of non-being, plural identity claims, mental-attitude ascriptions, meaning attributions, and truth-talk. They consider 'deflationism about truth', explaining why deflationists should be fictionalists, and show how their philosophical fictionalist account of truth-talk underwrites a dissolution of the Liar Paradox and its kin. (...)
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  2. Normativity Without Exception: Donald Davidson On Language And Communication.Sonia Arribas - 2007 - Sorites 18:76-97.
    This paper deals with three texts by Donald Davidson's that discuss the issue of linguistic innovation from different epistemological standpoints. I show that Davidson's theory of metaphor undergoes a crucial transformation: from an early stage in which metaphor is viewed as an unintelligible and exceptional element external to language, to a later stage in which it is conceived as intrinsic to language, and thus as potentially understandable. This tracing of Davidson's development leads me to formulate an understanding of the concepts (...)
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  3. Speaking Loosely: Sentence Nonliterality.Kent Bach - 2001 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 25 (1):249–263.
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  4. Review: Literal Meaning. [REVIEW]E. Borg - 2006 - Mind 115 (458):461-465.
  5. The Literal and the Figurative.Hugh Bredin - 1992 - Philosophy 67 (259):69 - 80.
    In everyday English usage, the words ‘literal’ and ‘figurative’ are normally taken to be opposite in meaning. It is an opposition with very ancient roots. One of its forbears was the medieval theory of Scriptural hermeneutics, which distinguished among the literal, allegorical, moral, and anagogic senses of Scripture. This itself had an ancestry in pre-Augustinian times: Augustine tells in his Confessions how he learned from Ambrose the trick of interpreting Scripture figuratively, thus eliminating the problems and contradictions created by a (...)
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  6. Review: Josef Stern, Metaphor in Context. [REVIEW]Elisabeth Camp - 2005 - Noûs 39 (4):715-731.
    Metaphor is a crucially context-dependent linguistic phenomenon. This fact was not clearly recognized until some time in the 1970’s. Until then, most theorists assumed that a sentence must have a fixed set of metaphorical meanings, if it had any at all. Often, they also assumed that metaphoricity was the product of grammatical deviance, in the form of a category mistake. To compensate for this deviance, they thought, at least one of the sentence’s constituent terms underwent a meaning-changing ‘metaphorical twist’, which (...)
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  7. Saying and Seeing-As: The Linguistic Uses and Cognitive Effects of Metaphor.Elisabeth Maura Camp - 2003 - Dissertation, University of California, Berkeley
    Metaphor is a pervasive and significant feature of language. We use metaphor to talk about the world in familiar and innovative ways, and in contexts ranging from everyday conversation to literature and scientific theorizing. However, metaphor poses serious challenges for standard philosophical theories of meaning, because it straddles so many important boundaries: between language and thought, between semantics and pragmatics, between rational communication and mere causal association. ;In this dissertation, I develop a pragmatic theory of metaphorical utterances which reconciles two (...)
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  8. Racial Epithets: What We Say and Mean by Them.Adam M. Croom - 2008 - Dialogue 51:34-45.
    Racial epithets are terms used to characterize people on the basis of their race, and are often used to harm the people that they target. But what do racial epithets mean, and how do they work to harm in the way that they do? In this essay I set out to answer these questions by offering a pragmatic view of racial epithets, while contrasting my position with Christopher Hom's semantic view.
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  9. Searle y el significado literal.Juan José Acero Fernández - 2006 - Revista de filosofía (Chile) 31:9-30.
    En su análisis del significado literal Searle ha utilizado el principio de que al llevar a cabo un acto de habla el significado literal de las expresiones proferidas deja indeterminado el contenido de este acto. Se argumenta que este principio, además de entrar en conflicto con ciertas intuiciones lingüísticas, conduce a análisis poco naturales de fenómenos como los de la existencia de constituyentes no articulados y de la transferencia semántica. Finalmente, se alega que una combinación de ideas de Wittgenstein y (...)
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  10. La Métaphore Inouïe.Ernesto Grassi, Marilène Raiola & Alain Pons - 1991
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  11. Literal Meaning and Rabbinic Hermeneutics: A Response to Claudio Luzzati and Jan Broekman.Bernard S. Jackson - 2001 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 14 (2):129-141.
    This response to the articles of Luzzati and Broekman (in this issue) addresses principally the character of early rabbinic legal interpretation, as viewed by the Rabbis themselves. It considers, with examples, their concept of "simple meaning'' (peshat), its place within their overall hermeneutic system and its theological presuppositions. The second section responds more briefly to thetheoretical critiques of Luzzati and Broekman, stressing that (my version of) semiotics is descriptive rather than normative; resists the reduction of textual meaning to interpretation; and (...)
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  12. Truth Vs. Pretense in Discourse About Motion (or, Why the Sun Really Does Rise).Brendan Jackson - 2007 - Noûs 41 (2):298–317.
    These days it is widely agreed that there is no such thing as absolute motion and rest; the motion of an object can only be characterized with respect to some chosen frame of reference.1 This is a fact of which many of us are well-aware, and yet a cursory consideration of the ways we ascribe motion to objects gives the impression that it is a fact we persistently ignore. We insist to the police officer that we came to a full (...)
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  13. The Anomaly of Literal Meaning in Davidson's Philosophy of Language.Deborah Knight - 1992 - Philosophy Today 36 (1):20-38.
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  14. Fiction's Ontological Commitments.Christopher Mole - 2009 - Philosophical Forum 40 (4):473-488.
    This article examines one way in which a fiction can carry ontological commitments. The ontological commitments that the article examines arise in cases where there are norms governing discourse about items in a fiction that cannot be accounted for by reference to the contents of the sentences that constitute a canonical telling of that fiction. In such cases, a fiction may depend for its contents on the real-world properties of real-world items, and the fiction may, in that sense, be ontologically (...)
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  15. Metonymy and Relevance.Anna Papafragou - unknown
    In the first half of the paper I critically review some previous attempts to deal with metonymy. I focus in particular on the classical approach, the associationist approach and the Gricean approach. The main point of my criticisms is that the notion of empirical associations among objects is in itself inadequate for a complete descriptive and explanatory account of metonymy.
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  16. Reply to Romero and Soria.François Recanati - 2013 - Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy 32 (2):175-178.
    Response to Romero's and Soria's paper in the Symposium on *Truth-Conditional Pragmatics* (OUP 2010).
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  17. Predelli and Carpintero on Literal Meaning.François Recanati - 2006 - Critica 38 (112):69-79.
    Reply to two critical reviews of Literal Meaning.
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  18. Précis de Literal Meaning.François Recanati - 2006 - Philosophiques 33 (1):231-236.
    Résumé de mon livre Literal Meaning (Cambridge University Press, 2004), à paraître dans la rubrique DISPUTATIO la revue canadienne Philosophiques, suivi de comptes rendus critiques par Steven Davis, Brendan Gillon, et Michel Seymour et de mes réponses.
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  19. Réponse a mes critiques.François Recanati - 2006 - Philosophiques 33 (1):275-288.
    Réponse à trois études critiques de mon livre Literal Meaning à paraître dans la revue Philosophiques (Montréal).
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  20. Literal Meaning.François Recanati - 2002 - Cambridge University Press.
    According to the dominant position among philosophers of language today, we can legitimately ascribe determinate contents to natural language sentences, independently of what the speaker actually means. This view contrasts with that held by ordinary language philosophers fifty years ago: according to them, speech acts, not sentences, are the primary bearers of content. François Recanati argues for the relevance of this controversy to the current debate about semantics and pragmatics. Is 'what is said' determined by linguistic conventions, or is it (...)
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  21. Literal/Nonliteral.François Recanati - 2001 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 25 (1):264–274.
  22. The Alleged Priority of Literal Interpretation.François Recanati - 1995 - Cognitive Science 19 (2):207-232.
    In this paper I argue against a widely accepted model of utterance interpretation, namely the LS model, according to which the literal interpretation of an utterance (the proposition literally expressed by that utterance) must be computed before non-literal interpretations can be entertained. Alleged arguments in favor of this model are shown to be fallacious, counterexamples are provided, and alternative models are sketched.
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  23. Processing Models for Non-Literal Discourse.Francois Recanati - 1994 - In Roberto Casati, Barry Smith & Graham Whiteca (eds.), Philosophy and the Cognitive Sciences, Proceedings of the 16th International Wittgenstein Symposium. pp. 277-290.
  24. Meaning and Force: The Pragmatics of Performative Utterances.François Récanati - 1987 - Cambridge University Press.
    Professor Recanati's book is a major new contribution to the philosophy of language. Its point of departure is a refutation of two views central to the work of speech-act theorists such as Austin & Searle: that speech acts are essentially conventional, & that the force of an utterance can be made fully explicit at the level of sentence-meaning & is in principle a matter of linguistic decoding. The author argues that no utterance can be fully understood simply in terms of (...)
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  25. Language as Literature: Characters in Everyday Spoken Discourse.Sergeiy Sandler - manuscript
    There are several linguistic phenomena that, when examined closely, give evidence that people speak through characters, much like authors of literary works do, in everyday discourse. However, most approaches in linguistics and in the philosophy of language leave little theoretical room for the appearance of characters in discourse. In particular, there is no linguistic criterion found to date, which can mark precisely what stretch of discourse within an utterance belongs to a character, and to which character. And yet, without at (...)
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  26. Literal Meaning.John R. Searle - 1978 - Erkenntnis 13 (1):207 - 224.
  27. On the Distinction Between Literal and Non-Literal Language.David Ian Sturdee - 1999 - Dissertation, University of Toronto (Canada)
    My topic is the nature and scope of literal language. Broadly stated, my objective is to examine how philosophers in the Western tradition have made use of the concept of literal meaning, in particular, how they have treated the distinction between literal and non-literal language. My approach is historical. I trace how various philosophers, from Plato and Aristotle to Frege to Grice and Davidson, treat this distinction, arguing that it is not until the advent of analytic philosophy in general, and (...)
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  28. Seeing Metaphor as Seeing-As: Remarks on Davidson's Positive View of Metaphor.Lynne Tirrell - 1991 - Philosophical Investigations 14 (2):143-154.
    Davidson suggests that metaphor is a pragmatic (not a semantic) phenomenon; on his view, metaphor is a perlocutionary effect prompts its audience to see one thing as another. Davidson rightly attacks speaker-intentionalism as the source of metaphorical meaning, but settles for an account that depends on audience intentions. A better approach would undermine intentionalism per se, replacing it with a social practice analysis based on patterns of extending the metaphor. This paper shows why Davidson’s perceptual model fails to stave off (...)
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  29. A Gricean Theory of Malaprops.Elmar Unnsteinsson - 2017 - Mind and Language 32 (3).
    Gricean intentionalists hold that what a speaker says and means by a linguistic utterance is determined by the speaker's communicative intention. On this view, one cannot really say anything without meaning it as well. Conventionalists argue, however, that malapropisms provide powerful counterexamples to this claim. I present two arguments against the conventionalist and sketch a new Gricean theory of speech errors, called the misarticulation theory. On this view, malapropisms are understood as a special case of mispronunciation. I argue that the (...)
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  30. The Problem of Literal Meaning.Edda Weigand - 1992 - In Maksim Stamenov (ed.), Current Advances in Semantic Theory. John Benjamins. pp. 73--311.
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  31. Literal Meaning and “Figurative Meaning”.Roger M. White - 2001 - Theoria 67 (1):24-59.
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  32. Linguistic Puzzles and Semantic Pretence.James A. Woodbridge & Bradley Armour-Garb - 2009 - In Sarah Sawyer (ed.), New Waves in Philosophy of Language. Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 250-284.
    In this paper, we set out what we see as a novel, and very promising, approach to resolving a number of the familiar linguistic puzzles that provide philosophy of language with much of its subject matter. The approach we promote postulates semantic pretense at work where these puzzles arise. We begin by briefly cataloging the relevant dilemmas. Then, after introducing the pretense approach, we indicate how it promises to handle these putatively intractable problems. We then consider a number of objections (...)
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  33. A Gricean Rearrangement of Epithets.Zsófia Zvolenszky - 2012 - In Ferenc Kiefer & Zoltán Bánréti (eds.), 20 Years of Theoretical Linguistics in Budapest: A selection of papers from the 2010 conference celebrating the twentieth anniversary of the Theoretical Linguistics Programme of Eötvös Loránd University. Tinta Publishing House. pp. 183-218.