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  1. Gandhi's Philosophy of Nonviolence: Essential Selections.Brian C. Barnett -
    A concise open-access teaching resource featuring essential selections from Gandhi on the philosophy of nonviolence. The book includes: a preface, brief explanatory notes, supplementary boxes containing related philosophical material, images and videos, an appendix on post-Gandhian nonviolence, questions for reflection/discussion, and suggestions for further study.
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  2. Non-Violence, Asceticism, and the Problem of Buddhist Nationalism.Yvonne Chiu - 2020 - Genealogy 4 (3).
    A religion with Buddhism's particular moral philosophies of non-violence and asceticism and with its *functional* polytheism in practice should not generate genocidal nationalist violence. Yet, there are resources within the Buddhist canon that people can draw from to justify violence in defense of the religion and of a Buddhist-based polity. When those resources are exploited, for example in the context of particular Theravāda Buddhist practices and the history of Buddhism and Buddhist identity in Burma from ancient times through its colonial (...)
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  3. The Satanic and the Theomimetic: Distinguishing and Reconciling "Sacrifice" in René Girard and Gregory the Great.Jordan Joseph Wales - 2020 - Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 27 (1):177-214.
    Compelling voices charge that the theological notion of “sacrifice” valorizes suffering and fosters a culture of violence by the claim that Christ’s death on the Cross paid for human sins. Beneath the ‘sacred’ violence of sacrifice, René Girard discerns a concealed scapegoat-murder driven by a distortion of human desire that itself must lead to human self-annihilation. I here ask: can one speak safely of sacrifice; and can human beings somehow cease to practice the sacrifice that must otherwise destroy them? Drawing (...)
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  4. Climate Engineering From Hindu‐Jain Perspectives.Pankaj Jain - 2019 - Zygon 54 (4):826-836.
    Although Indic perspectives toward nature are now well documented, climate engineering discussions seem to still lack the views from Indic or other non‐Western sources. In this article, I will apply some of the Hindu and Jain concepts such as karma, nonviolence (Ahiṃsā ), humility (Vinaya ), and renunciation (Saṃnyāsa ) to analyze the two primary climate geoengineering strategies of solar radiation management (SRM) and carbon dioxide removal (CDR). I suggest that Indic philosophical and religious traditions such as Hinduism, Buddhism, and (...)
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  5. Blessed Are the Peacemakers: Pacifism, Just War, and Peacebuilding. [REVIEW]Brian Stiltner - 2019 - Journal of Catholic Social Thought 17 (1):171-173.
  6. Pacific Resistance: A Moral Alternative to Defensive War.Lee-Ann Chae - 2018 - Social Theory & Practice 44 (1):1-20.
    It is widely believed that some wars are just, and that the paradigm case of a just war is a defensive war. A familiar strategy used to justify defensive war is to infer its permissibility from the case of self-defensive killing. I show, however, that the permission to defend oneself does not justify killing, but instead calls for nonviolent resistance. I conclude that on the account of self-defense I develop, the appropriate way to respond to a war of aggression is (...)
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  7. The Pacifist Tradition and Pacifism as Transformative and Critical Theory.Andrew Fiala - 2018 - The Acorn 18 (1):5-28.
    Pacifism is often painted into a corner as an absolute rejection of all violence and war. Such a dogmatic and negative formulation of pacifism does leave us with pacifism as a morally problematic position. But pacifism is not best understood as a negative claim. Nor is pacifism best understood as a singular or monistic concept. Rather, there is a “pacifist tradition” that is grounded in an affirmative claim about the importance of nonviolence, love, community building, and peaceful conflict resolution. This (...)
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  8. The Routledge Handbook of Pacifism and Nonviolence.Andrew Fiala (ed.) - 2018 - Routledge.
    Interest in pacifism—an idea with a long history in philosophical thought and in several religious traditions—is growing. The Routledge Handbook of Pacifism and Nonviolence is the first comprehensive reference designed to introduce newcomers and researchers to the many varieties of pacifism and nonviolence, to their history and philosophy, and to pacifism’s most serious critiques. The volume offers 32 brand new chapters from the world’s leading experts across a diverse range of fields, who together provide a broad discussion of pacifism and (...)
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  9. Peace, Culture, and Violence.Fuat Gursozlu (ed.) - 2018 - Brill.
    Peace, Culture, and Violence examines deeper sources of violence by providing a critical reflection on the forms of violence that permeate everyday life and our inability to recognize these forms of violence. Exploring the elements of culture that legitimize and normalize violence, the essays collected in this volume invite us to recognize and critically approach the violent aspects of reality we live in and encourage us to envision peaceful alternatives. Including chapters written by important scholars in the fields of Peace (...)
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  10. Civil Resistance Wisdom From Three Quaker Elders.Tom Hastings - 2018 - The Acorn 18 (1):87-92.
    Three Quaker elders, all scholar activists, have just published two important works for anyone studying nonviolence, works that are framed very differently but which complement each other well. One is a new work by the estimable George Lakey, who has trained nonviolent resisters around the world in many countries for decades, and whose thinking has always been structural, strategic, and careful. The other work is by Alice and Staughton Lynd, two historians whose activism education stretches far back to teaching in (...)
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  11. Humanitarian Intervention and the Problem of Genocide and Atrocity.Jennifer Kling - 2018 - In Andrew Fiala (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Pacifism and Nonviolence. London, UK: Routledge. pp. 327-346.
    We tend to think that mass atrocities and attempted genocides call for humanitarian intervention by other states. (Nonviolent intervention if possible, military intervention if need be.) In this chapter, I discuss these two related claims in turn. What, if anything, justifies humanitarian intervention in certain states by other states? Ought such interventions, if justified, be pacifist in nature, or is it legitimate in some cases to intervene violently? To discuss these questions, I draw primarily on principles and arguments found in (...)
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  12. Resisting Violence and Domination.Court Lewis - 2018 - The Acorn 18 (1):85-87.
    Focusing on what he considers “one of the most important and enduring expressions of twentieth-century political imagination and action and one ever more important in the struggles of the present century,” Howard Caygill’s On Resistance: A Philosophy of Defiance provides a thorough and challenging look into the concept of resistance. Recognizing that ‘resistance’ itself resists conceptualization, Caygill develops a clear means to understanding its nature, its usage in a variety of writings and situations over the past century and a half, (...)
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  13. Pacifism and Nonviolence as Philosophical Mandate.Greg Moses - 2018 - The Acorn 18 (1):1-4.
    Long about 2014 or 2015 Andrew Fiala was negotiating the title of a handbook project. Meanwhile, in March of 2016, editors of The Acorn were deliberating a revised subtitle for the journal. Both projects landed on the same key terms: pacifism and nonviolence. A zeitgeist was afoot. In this volume, we present Fiala’s framing of philosophical pacifism. Exemplary virtues still by and large belong to the warrior (nor are we here to dismiss the warrior’s honor as such.) Yet, as Steven (...)
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  14. A Realist Approach to Immigration.Bat-Ami Bar On - 2017 - The Acorn 17 (1):81-82.
    In Strangers in Our Midst, David Miller develops a philosophical position that is intended to guide the complex decisions that liberal democratic states face regarding immigration policy. While it is not likely that Miller’s arguments will convince anyone who is principally committed to the kind of open borders that truly enable the free movement of people across them, Miller has much to offer to those who are either (a) trying to make sense of the position of people who object to (...)
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  15. Gene Sharp and the Twenty-First Century.Jack DuVall - 2017 - The Acorn 17 (2):99-100.
    Although Gene Sharp was a pacifist, he was also, in the last few decades of the 20th century, the initial framer of a new methodology of political and social struggle, which is now often referred to as civil resistance. Organizers of successful people’s movements in Poland, Czechoslovakia, South Africa, Mali, Ukraine, Tunisia and a score of other countries in the last thirty years pushed out rights-violating rulers and did so without resort to violence.
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  16. Remembering Gene Sharp.Barry Gan - 2017 - The Acorn 17 (2):95-97.
    Gene Sharp passed away on January 28, 2018, two days before the anniversary of the assassination of Mahatma Gandhi. His influence in the field of nonviolence has been immense, and much of the work in nonviolence that has been done in the last forty years has had to address Sharp’s work. The direction in which Sharp took the field of nonviolence differed from that of Gandhi. Gandhi based his life around a metaphysics and an ethic that, for him, dictated his (...)
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  17. Undermining Neoliberalism.William Gay - 2017 - The Acorn 17 (2):145-149.
    Todd May seeks to provide a philosophical introduction to nonviolence, particularly to campaigns of nonviolent resistance. He claims his book is the first with such a focus. Regardless, if one looks beyond the mainstream literature, a lot of work, including on this topic, has been done over the last several decades by philosophers who are seeking to advance nonviolence and social justice. Nevertheless, as a contribution to more traditional philosophical discussions, May’s book is noteworthy in its themes and arguments. This (...)
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  18. Ahimsa as a Way of Life. [REVIEW]Sanjay Lal - 2017 - The Acorn 17 (2):150-153.
    The often heard (and justified) lament that academics do not adequately communicate their ideas to the broader general public has been particularly applicable to those theorists, like scholars of nonviolence, who work on the pressing moral issues facing our world. This work, ultimately the result of co-editor Predgrag Cicovacki’s deep and abiding interest in Jainism, does much to counter such impressions. Comprised of two volumes and forty-six chapters, Nonviolence as A Way of Life brings together insights from a notable international (...)
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  19. Reframing Islam as a Nonviolent Force.Court Lewis - 2017 - The Acorn 17 (2):143-144.
    Islam has come to be associated with hatred and terrorism, which has resulted in many thinking that Islam (and all Muslims) are fundamentally violent. Chaiwat Satha-Anand’s collection of revised essays featured in Nonviolence and Islamic Imperatives attempts to undermine such a narrative and reframe Islam in terms of peace and nonviolence. To achieve this goal, Satha-Anand argues that Islam’s core values require nonviolence and supports his argument by providing examples from the Prophet Muhammad and contemporary Muslims.
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  20. Editor's Introduction.Greg Moses - 2017 - The Acorn 17 (1):1-3.
    Epicurus, Marcus Aurelius, Mahatma Gandhi, Alain Locke, Howard Thurman, and Dr. Huey Newton comprise central figures of concern in three feature articles of this issue. The fourth feature takes us on a climate march through Washington, D.C. where the central figure of concern is a broken global relationship. In addition, we offer book reviews that take up applications of nonviolence to counter-terrorism, of ethics to immigration, of pacifism to war, and cosmopolitanism to peacebuilding.
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  21. Evolutions of Consciousness in Thurman and Newton.Anthony Sean Neal, Dwayne A. Tunstall & Felipe Hinojosa - 2017 - The Acorn 17 (1):61-77.
    In Common Ground, Anthony Neal examines the role that the ideas of consciousness and consciousness-raising play in the writings of Howard Thurman and Huey Newton. He examines these ideas from a broadly Afrocentric framework in which the concerns, interests, and perspectives of Africans--whether they reside on the continent or live in the African diaspora--are the legitimate and central subjects of scholarly study. This approach warrants Neal’s interpretation of Thurman’s and Newton’s writings as fitting within the “African Freedom Aesthetic,” in which (...)
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  22. Between Mediation and Critique: Quaker Nonviolence in Apartheid Cape Town, 1976–1990.Mtc Shafer - 2017 - European Journal of Political Theory 19 (4):593-613.
    In the final years of legal apartheid, the small community of Quakers in Cape Town, South Africa sought to apply their tradition of political and theological nonviolence to the systematic injustice...
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  23. Nonviolence in Political Theory.Alexandru Cristea - 2016 - Contemporary Political Theory 15 (1):e32-e35.
  24. Seeds of Duty.Barry L. Gan - 2016 - The Acorn 16 (1-2):37-40.
    The duties that Gandhi believed we should follow came chiefly from the Jain religion, whose main precept is ahimsa—perhaps the only word I understood in the second musical piece performed for us earlier by Sudha Ragunathan. Ahimsa means non-harm or nonviolence, for which we gather here today. Another important precept for Gandhi and the Jains is Truth. But it is important to understand why Gandhi himself attached so much importance to these precepts of nonviolence and Truth. Gandhi said, "God is (...)
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  25. Three Hundred Years Toward Peace. [REVIEW]Tom H. Hastings - 2016 - The Acorn 16 (1-2):53-55.
    Review of: War No More: Three Centuries of American Antiwar and Peace Writing. Edited by Lawrence Rosenwald. Library Classics of the United States, 2016. For those offering a course in the peace history of America, this is your text. From the title you may correctly surmise that there is content by or about those living in colonial America, but the very first offering of this edited magisterial compilation of primary documents is a fragment from the legendary pre-colonial peacemaker Dekanawideh, circa (...)
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  26. Pacifism: A Philosophy of Nonviolence.Robert L. Holmes - 2016 - Bloomsbury.
    In a world riven with conflict, violence and war, this book proposes a philosophical defense of pacifism. It argues that there is a moral presumption against war and unless that presumption is defeated, war is unjustified. Leading philosopher of non-violence Robert Holmes contends that neither just war theory nor the rationales for recent wars defeat that presumption, hence that war in the modern world is morally unjustified. A detailed, comprehensive and elegantly argued text which guides both students and scholars through (...)
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  27. Gandhi Philosopher. [REVIEW]Sanjay Lal - 2016 - The Acorn 16 (1-2):55-59.
    Alongside Bindhu Puri’s The Tagore-Gandhi Debate on Matters of Truth and Untruth and Predrag Cicovacki’s Gandhi’s Footprints (see further discussion in this issue) can be placed Anuradha Veeravalli’s Gandhi in Political Theory: Truth, Law, and Experiment as a significant contribution to the aim of showing the academic bona fides of Gandhian philosophy. Though technically, Veeravalli’s explicit emphasis is on understanding Gandhi as a political theorist and not as a philosopher per se, the philosophical import of her attempts to explicate the (...)
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  28. A Machiavellian Approach to Pacifism. [REVIEW]Court Lewis - 2016 - The Acorn 16 (1-2):59-61.
    Sara Trovato’s Mainstreaming Pacifism: Conflict, Success, and Ethics provides a thorough and engaging argument for why pacifism is an effectual means for creating social-political justice and peace. Standing up to claims that pacifists are politically passive and accepting of injustice, Trovato shows that the peace of pacifism is compatible with the fight for justice. By showing that pacifists can consistently retain their ideals while fighting for justice, Trovato offers an alternative to effective means of violence. In her words, “violence can (...)
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  29. Essential Bibliography of Cesar Chavez.José-Antonio Orosco - 2016 - The Acorn 16 (1-2):13-14.
    Cesar Chavez (March 31, 1927 – April 23, 1993), who co-founded with Dolores Huerta the United Farm Workers (UFW), organized nonviolent strikes, marches, and national boycotts in service to securing labor rights and better working conditions for farm workers in the USA. His birthday is widely celebrated as a holiday commemorating the movement and its values.
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  30. Philosophy of Nonviolence: Revolution, Constitutionalism, and Justice Beyond the Middle East.Chibli Mallat - 2015 - Oxford University Press USA.
    In 2011, the Middle East saw more people peacefully protesting long entrenched dictatorships than at any time in its history. The dictators of Tunisia, Egypt, and Yemen were deposed in a matter of weeks by nonviolent marches. Imprecisely described as 'the Arab Spring', the revolution has been convulsing the whole region ever since. Beyond an uneven course in different countries, Philosophy of Nonviolence examines how 2011 may have ushered in a fundamental break in world history. The break, the book argues, (...)
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  31. Nonviolent Resistance: A Philosophical Introduction.Todd May - 2015 - Polity.
    We see nonviolent resistance all over today’s world, from Egypt’s Tahrir Square to New York Occupy. Although we think of the last century as one marked by wars and violent conflict, in fact it was just as much a century of nonviolence as the achievements of Mohandas Gandhi and Martin Luther King, Jr. and peaceful protests like the one that removed Ferdinand Marcos from the Philippines clearly demonstrate. But what is nonviolence? What makes a campaign a nonviolent one, and how (...)
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  32. Cultivating Cultures of Struggle.Greg Moses - 2015 - Radical Philosophy Review 18 (1):115-124.
    Drawing on contexts of critical theory offered by Simone de Beauvoir, Herbert Marcuse, and Angela Davis, this article argues that Alain Locke’s theory of valuation should be of interest to theorists who apprehend struggle as a process of desire. Locke’s value theory with its classification of “form-feelings” may be used to develop appreciation for value’s genealogical dependence on desire. This has consequences for theorizing the challenges faced by liberation from oppressive structures. A case study is provided from popular film.
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  33. Gandhi’s Many Influences and Collaborators.Gail Presbey - 2015 - Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East 35 (2):360-69.
    In Gandhi's Printing Press, Isabel Hofmeyr introduces readers to the nuances of the newspaper in a far-flung colony in the age when mail and news traveled by ship and when readers were encouraged by Gandhi to read slowly and deeply. This article explores the ways in which Thoreau's concept of slow reading influenced Gandhi and Hofmeyr herself. She discusses the community that surrounded Gandhi and the role it played in supporting the newspaper. Yet, I argue, the role of women of (...)
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  34. Gandhi on Non-Violence.Bhuvan Chandel - 2014 - Diogenes 61 (3-4):135-142.
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  35. Jesus Christ, Peacemaker: A New Theology of Peace by Terrence J. Rynne. [REVIEW]Daniel Cosacchi - 2014 - Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 24 (1):134-137.
  36. Peace Philosophy and Public Life: Commitments, Crises, and Concepts for Engaged Thinking.Greg Moses & Gail M. Presbey (eds.) - 2014 - Editions Rodopi.
    To a world assaulted by private interests, this book argues that peace must be a public thing. Distinguished philosophers of peace have always worked publicly for public results. Opposing nuclear proliferation, organizing communities of the disinherited, challenging violence within status quo establishments, such are the legacies of truly engaged philosophers of peace. This volume remembers those legacies, reviews the promise of critical thinking for crises today, and expands the free range of thinking needed to create more mindful and peaceful relations. (...)
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  37. Violence and Nonviolence: An Introduction.Barry L. Gan - 2013 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Barry L. Gan's Violence and Nonviolence: An Introduction introduces readers to myths about the violence taken for granted in our daily lives, and advocates for more principled, nonviolent action on moral, ethical and philosophical grounds.
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  38. A Shocking Gap Made Visible: King's Pacifist Materialism and the Method of Nonviolent Social Change.Greg Moses - 2012 - In Robert Birt (ed.), The Liberatory Thought of Martin Luther King, Jr.: Critical Essays on the Philosopher King. Lanham, MD 20706, USA: pp. 263-73.
    Contrary to common belief, Martin Luther King, Jr. does not refute the right to violence. Yet in situations where a right to violence would obtain, King chooses nonviolence. While King's renunciation is often articulated in terms of ideal obligations to transcendent principles, this study makes the case that nonviolence may be preferred for material effects. In fact, King often articulated the case for nonviolence in two modes: the better known transcendental mode and the lesser studied material mode, what is here (...)
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  39. Nonviolence in Theory and Practice - Tribute to Robert Holmes.Predrag Cicovacki - 2011 - The Acorn 14 (2):59-62.
  40. The Concept of Non-Violence in the Philosophy of the Imperial Stoa.Panos Eliopoulos - 2011 - Philosophy Study 1 (1):28-40.
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  41. Justifying Non-Violent Civil Disobedience Within the Kenyan Context: A Moral Perspective.Rmj Oduor - 2011 - Thought and Practice: A Journal of the Philosophical Association of Kenya 3 (1):21-59.
    This paper employs the critical and analytical techniques of philosophical reflection to present a moral justification for the use of non-violent civil disobedience by Kenyan citizens in pursuit of their aspirations. It sets out with a brief review of political disobedience in Kenya from the advent of the British invasion and domination of the country in the late nineteenth century to the present. Next, it examines the nature of non-violent civil disobedience, outlining the views of four of its most influential (...)
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  42. Violence, Nonviolence, and the Palestinian National Movement.Wendy Pearlman - 2011 - Cambridge University Press.
    Why do some national movements use violent protest and others nonviolent protest? Wendy Pearlman shows that much of the answer lies inside movements themselves. Nonviolent protest requires coordination and restraint, which only a cohesive movement can provide. When, by contrast, a movement is fragmented, factional competition generates new incentives for violence and authority structures are too weak to constrain escalation. Pearlman reveals these patterns across one hundred years in the Palestinian national movement, with comparisons to South Africa and Northern Ireland. (...)
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  43. Capitini, Aldo.Sergio Volodia Marcello Cremaschi - 2010 - Leksikon for Det 21. Århundrede.
    A brief presentation of life, activity and publications of an Italian philosopher, the founder with Guido Calogero of the Liberal-Socialist movement under the Fascist regime and the theorist of non-violence and omnicracy as the key ideas for a new left, beyond reformism and third-International state-socialism.
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  44. Creating a New Discourse of Peace in Schools: Restorative Justice in Education.Tom Cavanagh - 2009 - Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 18 (1/2):62-85.
    Creating a new discourse of peace in schools offers educators a choice in how they think, believe, and act in response to student wrongdoing and conflict. In this article the reader is introduced to how restorative justice principles can be used in education as a way of supporting a school-wide culture of care, where building and maintaining healthy relationships are fundamental principles. Thisnew discourse offers an alternative to the traditional discipline practices in schools, which focus on rules and consequences. The (...)
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  45. Spiritual and Political Dimensions of Nonviolence and Peace.David Boersema & Katy Gray Brown (eds.) - 2006 - Brill | Rodopi.
    This book is a collection of philosophical papers that explores theoretical and practical aspects and implications of nonviolence as a means of establishing peace. The papers range from spiritual and political dimensions of nonviolence to issues of justice and values and proposals for action and change.
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  46. Evaluating the Legacy of Nonviolence in South Africa.Gail Presbey - 2006 - Peace and Change 31 (2):141-174.
    This paper engages an important debate going on in the literature regarding the efficacy of nonviolence in confronting unjust regimes. I will focus on the commentators who have claimed that nonviolence, if adhered to more resolutely, would have ended South African apartheid sooner. I will contrast them to Mandela’s account that both violence and nonviolence working in tandem were needed to bring a speedy and just resolution to South Africa’s crisis of racist governance. To consider South Africa an easy case (...)
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  47. Violence and Non-Violence in Conflict Resolution: Some Theological Reflections.Duncan B. Forrester - 2003 - Studies in Christian Ethics 16 (2):64-79.
    Christian thought on the resolution of conflicts rests on a strong predisposition against violence and a determination to discourage outbreaks of violence, limit the means used, and bring the conflict to as speedy an end as possible. Less attention has been given to the psychological and social roots of violence, the moments of transition from violence to diplomacy and reconciliation, and alternative ways of conflict resolution. These three areas are explored with special reference to the use of sanctions, the WCC’s (...)
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  48. Gandhi’s Challenge To Our Paradigm Of Justifiable Violence.Bart Gruzalski - 2000 - The Acorn 10 (2):5-18.
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  49. Gandhi.Sergio Volodia Marcello Cremaschi - 1996 - In Enciclopedia della Filosofia e delle Scienze Umane. Novara, Italy: deAgostini. pp. 356.
    The encounter with critics of Western civilization, from vegetarianism and British anti-industrialist socialism, Thoreau's theories of civil disobedience and Tolstoy's evangelical Christianity, led Gandhi to a rediscovery of Indian tradition. Unlike other forms of Afro-Asian cultural nationalism, this claim was neither conservative nor separatist but led to a fresh reading of some key concepts from the Indian tradition combined with ideas from the Christian, the Islamic and the European humanistic traditions.
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  50. Nonviolenza.Sergio Volodia Marcello Cremaschi - 1996 - In Enciclopedia della Filosofia e delle Scienze Umane.
    A short reconstruction of the birth and development of the doctrine of non-violence.
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