Normative Ethics

Edited by Jussi Suikkanen (University of Birmingham)
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  1. added 2017-08-17
    Supererogation, Optionality and Cost.Claire Benn - forthcoming - Philosophical Studies:1-19.
    A familiar part of debates about supererogatory actions concerns the role that cost should play. Two camps have emerged: one claiming that extreme cost is a necessary condition for when an action is supererogatory, while the other denies that it should be part of our definition of supererogation. In this paper, I propose an alternative position. I argue that it is comparative cost that is central to the supererogatory and that it is needed to explain a feature that all accounts (...)
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  2. added 2017-08-17
    Beyond the Call of Beauty: Everyday Aesthetic Demands Under Patriarchy.Alfred Archer & Lauren Ware - forthcoming - The Monist.
    his paper defends two claims. First, we will argue for the existence of aesthetic demands in the realm of everyday aesthetics, and that these demands are not reducible to moral demands. Second, we will argue that we must recognise the limits of these demands in order to combat a widespread form of gendered oppression. The concept of aesthetic supererogation offers a new structural framework to understand both the pernicious nature of this oppression and what may be done to mitigate it.
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  3. added 2017-08-16
    Ubuntu, Christianity and Restorative Justice.Thaddeus Metz - forthcoming - In Mohammed Girma (ed.), Healing the Memories: An African Christian Response to Politically Induced Conflicts (tentative title).
    A consideration of how salient Christian and African ethical ideas compare and contrast when applied to transitional, and specifically restorative, justice.
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  4. added 2017-08-15
    The Virtue of Emerson's Imitation of Christ: From William Ellery Channing to John Brown.Emily J. Dumler‐Winckler - 2017 - Journal of Religious Ethics 45 (3):510-538.
    Christians have traditionally conceived of the moral life as an imitation of Christ, whereby followers enter into fellowship with God. The American Transcendentalists can be understood as extending rather than dispensing with this legacy. For Emerson, a person cultivates virtues by imitating those she loves and admires. Ultimately, however, the virtues enable her to innovate on received models, to excel by pressing beyond exemplars. Emerson's famous line, “imitation is suicide,” is not a contradiction but a fulfillment of the imitation of (...)
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  5. added 2017-08-15
    Islamic Bioethics and Animal Research: The Case of Iran.Robert Tappan - 2017 - Journal of Religious Ethics 45 (3):562-578.
    Despite growing interest in Islamic bioethics, little work has been done on research ethics in Islam, and even less on animal research ethics. This essay explores religious and scientific insights into the lives of animals used as research subjects, particularly in Iran. The inner lives of animals and their relationship to their Creator as relayed by the Qur'an, ethological research on animal minds, and neuroethical reflection on painience are brought together to question the current, relatively unrestricted use of research animals (...)
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  6. added 2017-08-15
    Just War Moralities.Gabriel Palmer‐Fernández - 2017 - Journal of Religious Ethics 45 (3):580-605.
    This essay discusses four recent books on the Western, and one book on the classical Chinese, traditions of just war. It concentrates on the jus ad bellum moral criteria, giving attention to the centrality of the state in just war morality, to some challenges in reconceptualizing the jus ad bellum in the context of non-state agents, and to controversies over a “presumption against war.”.
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  7. added 2017-08-15
    Which Teacher Should I Choose?: A Xunzian Approach to Distinguishing Moral Experts From Fanatics.Eirik Lang Harris - 2017 - Journal of Religious Ethics 45 (3):463-480.
    This essay examines whether an invocation of an epistemological privilege on the part of supposed moral experts prevents potential students from being able to evaluate among potential candidates for the role of plausible moral teacher. Throughout, it works to demonstrate that it is possible for even the untutored student to distinguish between a fanatic and a moral expert. In particular, this essay focuses on the version of virtue ethics espoused by the early Chinese philosopher Xunzi. It argues that by reflecting (...)
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  8. added 2017-08-15
    Kierkegaard's Critique of Eudaimonism: A Reassessment.Carson Webb - 2017 - Journal of Religious Ethics 45 (3):437-462.
    Interpreters are less univocal than one might think in assessing Søren Kierkegaard's attitude toward eudaimonism. Through an analysis of several key texts from across Kierkegaard's authorship, I argue that existing interpretations do not convincingly address the relationship between Kierkegaard's critique of eudaimonism and his mid-nineteenth-century context, which was dominated by post-Kantian idealists. While I am sympathetic to aspects of deontological and aretaic interpretations, a contextual reading shows that his critique centers on what he diagnoses as the enclosure of the modern (...)
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  9. added 2017-08-15
    Beyond Eschatology: Environmental Pessimism and the Future of Human Hoping.Willa Swenson‐Lengyel - 2017 - Journal of Religious Ethics 45 (3):413-436.
    In much environmentally concerned literature, there is a burgeoning concern for the status and sustainability of human hope. Within Christian circles, this attention has often taken the form of eschatological reflection. While there is important warrant for attention to eschatology in Christian examinations of hope, I claim that to move so quickly from hope to eschatology is to confuse a species of Christian hope for a definition of hope itself; as such, it is important for theological ethicists to examine hope (...)
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  10. added 2017-08-15
    A Loss of Judgment: The Dismissal of the Judicial Conscience in Recent Christian Ethics.Morgan Jeffrey - 2017 - Journal of Religious Ethics 45 (3):539-561.
    Christian ethicists have neglected conscience, understood as an individual's moral self-awareness before a locus of accountability and judgment, over the last few decades. The aim of this essay is to suggest how this neglect came about. I draw on the work of Paul Lehmann and Oliver O'Donovan to illustrate how ethicists in the twentieth century became suspicious of conscience because of its association with the alleged ahistorical individualism of Immanuel Kant's work. I argue that a social-historicist conception of conscience, such (...)
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  11. added 2017-08-15
    Aquinas's Opposition to Killing the Innocent and its Distinctiveness Within the Christian Just War Tradition.H. Weiss Daniel - 2017 - Journal of Religious Ethics 45 (3):481-509.
    This essay argues that Aquinas's position regarding the killing of innocent people differs significantly from other representatives of the Christian just war tradition. While his predecessors, notably Augustine, as well as his successors, from Cajetan and Vitoria onward, affirm the legitimacy of causing the death of innocents in a just war in cases of necessity, Aquinas holds that causing the death of innocents in a foreseeable manner, whether intentionally or indirectly, is never justified. Even an otherwise legitimate act of just (...)
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  12. added 2017-08-15
    Evolved Morality: The Biology and Philosophy of Human Conscience.Frans de Waal, Patricia Smith Churchland, Telmo Pievani & Stefano Parmigiani (eds.) - 2014 - Leiden, The Netherlands: Brill.
  13. added 2017-08-14
    Gemeinsame Hilfspflichten, Weltarmut und kumulative Handlungen.Anne Schwenkenbecher - 2017 - Zeitschrift Für Praktische Philosophie 4 (1):123-150.
    Pflichten der Armutsbekämpfung werden häufig als kollektive oder gemeinsame Hilfspflichten dargestellt. Auf den ersten Blick ist diese Idee überzeugend: Da Weltarmut ein Problem ist, das sich nur durch eine gemeinsame Anstrengung erfolgreich lösen lässt, sollte dessen Bekämpfung als kollektive Pflicht vieler angesehen werden. Was aber kann mit einer kollektiven Pflicht genau gemeint sein? Dieser Aufsatz führt eine Unterscheidung von genuinen und kumulativen kollektiven Handlungen ein. Genuin kooperative Handlungen erfordern genau aufeinander abgestimmte Beitragshandlungen, während kumulative Handlungen durch unabhängige Beiträge ausgeführt werden (...)
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  14. added 2017-08-11
    The Need for Authenticity-Based Autonomy in Medical Ethics.Lucie White - forthcoming - HEC Forum:1-19.
    The notion of respect for autonomy dominates bioethical discussion, though what qualifies precisely as autonomous action is notoriously elusive. In recent decades, the notion of autonomy in medical contexts has often been defined in opposition to the notion of autonomy favoured by theoretical philosophers. Where many contemporary theoretical accounts of autonomy place emphasis on a condition of “authenticity”, the special relation a desire must have to the self, bioethicists often regard such a focus as irrelevant to the concerns of medical (...)
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  15. added 2017-08-11
    Ends and Means of Transitional Justice.Thaddeus Metz - forthcoming - Journal of Global Ethics.
    With her new book, The Conceptual Foundations of Transitional Justice, Colleen Murphy has advanced novel, comprehensive and sophisticated philosophical accounts of both what severely conflict-ridden societies should be aiming for and how they should pursue it. Ultimately grounded on a prizing of rational agency, Murphy maintains that these societies, roughly, ought to strive for a stable and legitimate democratic polity committed to not repeating gross historical injustice and do so in ways that do right by victims. In this article, I (...)
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  16. added 2017-08-11
    Feeling and Inclination: Rationalizing the Animal Within.Janelle DeWitt - forthcoming - In Kelly Sorensen & Diane Williamson (eds.), Kant and the Faculty of Feeling. Cambridge University Press.
    A common assumption among Kantians is that the feelings/inclinations constituting non-moral motivation are little different from the brute sensations and blind instinctual urges found in animals. And since this “inner animal” lacks reason, it cannot control itself. So our rational nature must step in to govern. The problem, however, is that it must do so as a nature standing above the animal as an independent ruler. I reject this understanding of our lower nature, arguing instead that reason governs from within (...)
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  17. added 2017-08-10
    Forgiveness and Reconciliation.Barrett Emerick - 2017 - In The Moral Psychology of Forgiveness. London, UK: Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 117-134.
    Forgiveness and reconciliation are central to moral life; after all, everyone will be wronged by others and will then face the dual decisions of whether to forgive and whether to reconcile. It is therefore important that we have a clear analysis of each, as well as a thoroughly articulated understanding of how they relate to and differ from each other. -/- Forgiveness has received considerably more attention in the Western philosophical literature than has reconciliation. In this paper I aim to (...)
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  18. added 2017-08-09
    Ability, Responsibility, and Global Justice.Wesley Buckwalter - forthcoming - Journal of the Indian Council of Philosophical Research.
    Many have argued we have a moral obligation to assist others in need, but given the scope of global suffering, how far does this obligation extend? According to one traditional philosophical view, the obligation to help others is limited by our ability to help them, or by the principle that “ought implies can”. This view is primarily defended on the grounds that it is a core principle of commonsense moral psychology. This paper reviews findings from experimental philosophy in cognitive science (...)
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  19. added 2017-08-09
    The Institutional Critique of Effective Altruism.Brian Berkey - forthcoming - Utilitas.
    In recent years, the effective altruism movement has generated much discussion about the ways in which we can most effectively improve the lives of the global poor, and pursue other morally important goals. One of the most common criticisms of the movement is that it has unjustifiably neglected issues related to institutional change that could address the root causes of poverty, and instead focused its attention on encouraging individuals to direct resources to organizations that directly aid people living in poverty. (...)
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  20. added 2017-08-09
    An Account of Earned Forgiveness Through Apology.Cristina Roadevin - forthcoming - Philosophia:1-18.
    I start by presenting an intuitively appealing account of forgiveness, ‘the insult account’, which nicely explains the cycle from wrongdoing to forgiveness. We need to respond to wrongdoing by blaming our offenders because they insult us with their actions, 529–55, 2001; Hampton 1988a, b). How can wrongdoing be overcome? Either by the retraction of the insult or by taking necessary steps to correct for the wrong done. Once the insult has been retracted, usually by apology or remorse, forgiveness can come (...)
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  21. added 2017-08-09
    Groups in Conflict: Equality Vs Community.Donald Edwin Franklin - 2008 - Cardiff: University of Wales Press.
    It is not possible fully to resolve the tension between the doctrine of equality and the set of values that implicitly underpins our partialist practices. But neither is it possible to compartmentalise our life into different spheres to be governed by different ethical precepts: there is no simple distinction to be made between the realms of political and personal morality.. Rather ethical decision-making is both holistically integrated and ridden with value conflict: in particular, impartiality is often in conflict with other (...)
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  22. added 2017-08-08
    Objective and Subjective Blame After War.Shannon Fyfe & Amy McKiernan - 2017 - Essays in Philosophy 18 (2).
    When soldiers come home from war, some experience lingering emotional effects from the choices they were forced to make, and the outcomes of these choices. In this article, we consider the gap between objective assessments of blame and subjective assessments of self-blame, guilt, and shame after war, and we suggest a way of understanding how soldiers can understand their moral responsibility from both of these vantage points. We examine arguments from just war theory regarding the objective moral responsibility of combatants (...)
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  23. added 2017-08-08
    The Saving/Creating Distinction and the Axiology of the Cost–Benefit Approach to Neonatal Medicine.Tomasz Żuradzki - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (8):29-31.
    The aim of this commentary is to discuss the axiology of the cost–benefit approach assumed by Travis Rieder (2017) to analyze medical decision making in the case of extremely preterm infants.
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  24. added 2017-08-08
    Rejoinder to Wall.Scott Forschler - 2017 - Metaphilosophy 48 (4):572-574.
    Edmund Wall's criticism of the author's earlier analysis of Hare's consequentialism and Kantian ethics claims that the author overlooked Hare's commitment to preference satisfaction as an “ultimate good.” This rejoinder points out that Hare never uses the phrase in question, nor any equivalent phrase or concept, in presenting his own arguments and refers only to the standard of “universalizability” as ultimate, in contexts that support the author's original argument. Hence Wall has only given us yet another example of how Hare's (...)
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  25. added 2017-08-07
    Dialogue as Moral Paradigm: Paths Toward Intercultural Transformation.J. Gregory Keller - 2011 - Policy Futures in Education 9:29-34.
    The Council of Europe’s 2008 White Paper on Intercultural Dialogue: ‘living together as equals in dignity’ points to the need for shared values upon which intercultural dialogue might rest. In order, however, to overcome the monologic separateness that threatens community, we must educate ourselves to recognize the dialogism of our humanity and to engage in deep encounters with others with a mature skepticism of all dogmatisms, including our own. In order to aid us in reaching the necessary insight, the author (...)
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  26. added 2017-08-06
    Towards a Constructivist Eudaemonism.Robert Bass - 2004 - Dissertation, Bowling Green State University
    Eudaemonism is the common structure of the family of theories in which the central moral conception is eudaemonia , understood as "living well" or "having a good life." In its best form, the virtues are understood as constitutive and therefore essential means to achieving or having such a life. What I seek to do is to lay the groundwork for an approach to eudaemonism grounded in practical reason, and especially in instrumental reasoning, rather than in natural teleology. In the first (...)
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  27. added 2017-08-04
    Secular and Religious: An American Quest for Coexistence.Edmund Byrne - 2011 - Bloomington: AuthorHouse.
    Drawing on group rights theory, author argues that a group organized around a religious motif should neither be summarily excluded from nor unduly favored in secular deliberations as to public policy and practice. To arrive at this conclusion he examines the implications of each of the following claims: (1) individuals need to operate in and through groups to influence government; (2) a political system faces moral difficulties if it is open to group-generated input; (3) worthy causes can be better advanced (...)
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  28. added 2017-08-01
    Spectrum Arguments and Hypersensitivity.Theron Pummer - 2017 - Philosophical Studies:1-16.
    Larry Temkin famously argues that what he calls spectrum arguments yield strong reason to reject Transitivity, according to which the ‘all-things-considered better than’ relation is transitive. Spectrum arguments do reveal that the conjunctions of independently plausible claims are inconsistent with Transitivity. But I argue that there is very strong independent reason to reject such conjunctions of claims, and thus that the fact that they are inconsistent with Transitivity does not yield strong reason to reject Transitivity.
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  29. added 2017-07-31
    The All or Nothing Problem.Joe Horton - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy 114 (2):94-104.
    There are many cases in which, by making some great sacrifice, you could bring about either a good outcome or a very good outcome. In some of these cases, it seems wrong for you to bring about the good outcome, since you could bring about the very good outcome with no additional sacrifice. It also seems permissible for you not to make the sacrifice, and bring about neither outcome. But together, these claims seem to imply that you ought to bring (...)
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  30. added 2017-07-30
    Philosophical Anthropology, Shame, and Disability: In Favor of an Interpersonal Theory of Shame.Matthew Rukgaber - 2016 - Res Philosophica 93 (4):743-765.
    This article argues against a leading cognitivist and moral interpretation of shame that is present in the philosophical literature. That standard view holds that shame is the felt-response to a loss of self-esteem, which is the result of negative self-assessment. I hold that shame is a heteronomous and primitive bodily affect that is perceptual rather than judgmental in nature. Shame results from the breakdown and thwarting of our desire for anonymous, unexceptional, and disattentive co-existence with others. I use the sociological (...)
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  31. added 2017-07-29
    The Curious Case of Ivan Karamazov: A Thomistic Account of Wisdom and Pride.Alina Beary - 2017 - Heythrop Journal 58 (5).
    Thomas Aquinas famously argues that it is not necessary to be virtuous in order to be wise. To many contemporary moral philosophers, this claim signals Aquinas’s failure to address the interrelatedness of our moral and intellectual life. I conduct a case study of Ivan Karamazov to demonstrate that this view is mistaken. After sketching Ivan’s character, I present Aquinas’s accounts of wisdom and pride and their nuanced relationship. I argue that Ivan illustrates the Thomistic view that pride, though not an (...)
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  32. added 2017-07-29
    The Trolley Problem and the Dropping of Atomic Bombs.Masahiro Morioka - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Life 7 (2):316-337.
    In this paper, the ethical and spiritual aspects of the trolley problem are discussed in connection with the dropping of atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. First, I show that the dropping of atomic bombs was a typical example of the events that contained the logic of the trolley problems in their decision-making processes and justifications. Second, I discuss five aspects of “the problem of the trolley problem;” that is to say, “Rarity,” “Inevitability,” “Safety Zone,” “Possibility of Becoming a Victim,” (...)
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  33. added 2017-07-29
    Ethics and the Community of Inquiry: Education for Deliberative Democracy.Gilbert Burgh, Terri Field & Mark Freakley - 2006 - South Melbourne: Cengage/Thomson.
    Ethics and the Community of Inquiry gets to the heart of democratic education and how best to achieve it. The book radically reshapes our understanding of education by offering a framework from which to integrate curriculum, teaching and learning and to place deliberative democracy at the centre of education reform. It makes a significant contribution to current debates on educational theory and practice, in particular to pedagogical and professional practice, and ethics education.
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  34. added 2017-07-28
    Dignity: A History.Remy Debes (ed.) - 2017 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    In everything from philosophical ethics to legal argument to public activism, it has become commonplace to appeal to the idea of human dignity. In such contexts, the concept of dignity typically signifies something like the fundamental moral status belonging to all humans. Remarkably, however, it is only in the last century that this meaning of the term has become standardized. Before this, dignity was instead a concept associated with social status. Unfortunately, this transformation remains something of a mystery in existing (...)
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  35. added 2017-07-27
    In Defence of the Epistemological Objection to Divine Command Theory.John Danaher - forthcoming - Sophia.
    Divine Command Theories (DCTs) comes in several different forms but at their core all of these theories claims that certain moral statuses (most typically the status of being obligatory) exist in virtue of the fact that God has commanded them to exist. Several authors argue that this core version of the DCT is vulnerable to an epistemological objection. According to this objection, DCT is deficient because certain groups of moral agents lack epistemic access to God’s commands. But there is confusion (...)
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  36. added 2017-07-26
    Right Action as Virtuous Action.Nicholas Ryan Smith - forthcoming - Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-14.
    I argue in favour of the central claim of virtue-ethical accounts of right action: that right action is virtuous action. First, I disambiguate this claim and argue for a specific interpretation of it. Second, I provide reasons to prefer target-centred over both agent-centred and motive-centred accounts of virtuous action. Third, I argue that an action is right if, only if, and because it is overall virtuous. Finally, I respond to important arguments to the contrary.
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  37. added 2017-07-25
    Introduction to ‘New Developments in the Theology of Character’.Angela Knobel & Christian Miller - 2017 - Studies in Christian Ethics 30 (3):260-261.
    This introduction describes the origins and rationale behind the papers that comprise this special issue of Studies in Christian Ethics. These papers represent several recent contributions to scholarship on the theology of character.
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  38. added 2017-07-24
    Empathy, Group Identity, and the Mechanisms of Exclusion: An Investigation Into the Limits of Empathy.Fuchs Thomas - forthcoming - Topoi:1-12.
    There is a conspicuous tendency of humans to experience empathy and sympathy preferentially towards members of their own group, whereas empathetic feelings towards outgroup members or strangers are often reduced or even missing. This may culminate in a “dissociation of empathy”: a historical example are the cases of Nazi perpetrators who behaved as compassionate family men on the one hand, yet committed crimes of utter cruelty against Jews on the other. The paper aims at explaining such phenomena and at determining (...)
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  39. added 2017-07-24
    Illocution and Empathy.Mitchell Green - forthcoming - Philosophia:1-13.
    Slote has argued that empathy plays a crucial role in such speech acts as questions and assertions. After clarifying some of the aims and limitations of speech act theory, providing an account of empathy and its potential epistemic value, and sketching the role that some speech acts play in expressing psychological states, we consider Slote’s argument for the place of empathy in questions and assertions. We show that the most that Slote has established is that some cases of questioning and (...)
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  40. added 2017-07-24
    Empathy and the Limits of Thought Experiments.Erick Ramirez - 2017 - Metaphilosophy 48 (4):504-526.
    This article criticizes what it calls perspectival thought experiments, which require subjects to mentally simulate a perspective before making judgments from within it. Examples include Judith Thomson's violinist analogy, Philippa Foot's trolley problem, and Bernard Williams's Jim case. The article argues that advances in the philosophical and psychological study of empathy suggest that the simulative capacities required by perspectival thought experiments are all but impossible. These thought experiments require agents to consciously simulate necessarily unconscious features of subjectivity. To complete these (...)
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  41. added 2017-07-24
    Empathy and Its Discontents.Paul Bloom - 2017 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 21 (1):24-31.
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  42. added 2017-07-24
    Spectacle and the Discourse of Empathy in Oriental Versions of Turandot.Wang I. -Chun - 2017 - Cultura 14 (1):29-42.
    The story of Turandot originated in the East. It was later transformed into the tale of a merciless princess, and adapted onto the stage. Puccini‟s Turandot has been one of the most frequently restaged operas in the West, but Turandot‟s unreasonable cruelty and abrupt change of character have raised a lot of questions. Since quite a few contemporary playwrights and directors try to interpret Turandot with elements of empathy, this paper analyse the versions of Turandot in the Eastern world in (...)
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  43. added 2017-07-24
    Investigating Pain : Torture, Empathy, and Ethics of Care.R. Doha Tanzeen - unknown
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  44. added 2017-07-21
    Positive Duties, Maxim Realism and the Deliberative Field.Samuel J. M. Kahn - forthcoming - Philosophical Inquiry.
    My goal in this paper is to show that it is not the case that positive duties can be derived from Kant’s so-called universalizability tests. I begin by explaining in detail what I mean by this and distinguishing it from a few things that I am not doing in this paper. After that, I confront the idea of a maxim contradictory, a concept that is advanced by many com- mentators in the attempt to derive positive duties from the universalizability tests. (...)
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  45. added 2017-07-21
    Reassessing the Foundations of Korsgaard’s Approach to Ethics.Samuel J. M. Kahn - 2017 - Dialegesthai. Rivista Telematica di Filosofia:online.
    In a series of well known publications, Christine Korsgaard argues for the claim that an agent acts morally just in case s/he acts autonomously. Two of Korsgaard's signature arguments for the connection between morality and autonomy are the "argument from spontaneity" and the "regress argument." In this paper, I argue that neither the argument from spontaneity nor the regress argument is able to show that an agent would be acting wrongly even if s/he acts in a paradigmatically heteronomous fashion.
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  46. added 2017-07-21
    Kant’s Theory of Conscience.Samuel J. M. Kahn - 2015 - In Pablo Muchnik & Oliver Thorndike (eds.), Rethinking Kant: Volume IV. Cambridge Scholars Publishing. pp. 135-156.
    In this paper I discuss Kant’s theory of conscience. In particular, I explicate the following two claims that Kant makes in the Metaphysics of Morals: (1) an erring conscience is an absurdity and (2) if an agent has acted according to his/her conscience, then s/he has done all that can be required of him/her. I argue that (1) is a very specific claim that does not bear on the problem of moral knowledge. I argue that (2) rests on a strongly (...)
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  47. added 2017-07-21
    Freedom, Morality, and the Propensity to Evil.Samuel J. M. Kahn - 2014 - Kantian Studies Online:65-90.
    In Book I of the Religion within the Boundaries of Mere Reason Kant offers an explanation of freedom and moral good and evil that is different from that offered in the Groundwork for a Metaphysics of Morals. My primary goal in this paper is to analyze and elucidate this new theory. My secondary goal is to contrast this new theory with the older one that it is replacing. I argue that the new theory, which centers on the idea that evil (...)
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  48. added 2017-07-21
    Defending the Possible Consent Interpretation From Actual Objections.Samuel J. M. Kahn - 2014 - Journal of Early Modern Studies 3 (2):88-100.
    In this paper, I defend the possible consent interpretation of Kant’s formula of humanity from objections according to which it has counterintuitive implications. I do this in two ways. First, I argue that to a great extent, the supposed counterintuitive implications rest on a misunderstanding of the possible consent interpretation. Second, I argue that to the extent that these supposed counterintuitive implications do not rest on a misunderstanding of the possible consent interpretation, they are not counterintuitive at all.
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  49. added 2017-07-21
    A Kantian Take on Fallible Principles and Fallible Judgments.Samuel J. M. Kahn - 2014 - American Dialectic 4 (1):1-27.
    According to Kant, if an agent acts according to his/her conscience, then s/he has done all that s/he ought as far as morality is concerned. But Kant thinks that agents can be mistaken in their subjective determinations of their duties. That is, Kant thinks it is possible for an agent to believe that some action X is right even though it is an objective truth that X is not right; according to Kant, agents do not have infallible knowledge of right (...)
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  50. added 2017-07-21
    A Reply to Bencivenga, “Consequences in Kantian Ethics.”.Samuel J. M. Kahn - 2013 - American Dialectic (1):285-288.
    In Bencivenga’s “Consequences in Kantian Ethics,” he offers a version of Kant’s ethics according to which the most rational approach to living one’s life is “to always imagine what might follow from one’s moves and to choose moves accordingly” (284), but according to which agents always nevertheless must be modest in their judgments about what they ought to do because the actual consequences of their actions might not turn out as they imagined. In this way, he tries to foreground the (...)
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