Normative Ethics

Edited by Jussi Suikkanen (University of Birmingham)
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  1. added 2021-05-13
    Review of Charlie Kurth's The Anxious Mind: An Investigation Into the Varieties and Virtues of Anxiety. [REVIEW]Daniel Kelly - forthcoming - Ethics.
    Kurth wants us to understand and appreciate our anxiety more than we typically do. His concise and crisply written monograph makes a good case that we should. It deepens our understanding of what anxiety is, and of how it animates different facets of our mental and moral lives. The case he builds that, roughly, anxiety is one of the brain’s ways of affectively signaling and responding to uncertainty is clearly argued and meticulously organized. Kurth hits the targets he sets for (...)
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  2. added 2021-05-13
    Reconsidering the Relationship Between Vitoria and Grotius’s Contributions to the International Law and Natural Law Traditions.John E. Carter - 2021 - Journal of Religious Ethics 49 (1):159-187.
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  3. added 2021-05-13
    Church Under Leviathan.Baldwin Wong - 2021 - Journal of Religious Ethics 49 (1):68-89.
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  4. added 2021-05-13
    Religious Ethics and Empirical Ethics.Ross Moret - 2021 - Journal of Religious Ethics 49 (1):33-67.
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  5. added 2021-05-13
    Disgust Can Be Morally Valuable.Charlie Kurth - 2021 - Scientific American 1.
    Distinguishing between changing and controlling our disgust responses helps us better understand the ways in which disgust can be morally valuable.
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  6. added 2021-05-13
    The Intensifying Intersection of Ethics, Religion, Theology, and Peace Studies.Heather M. DuBois - 2021 - Journal of Religious Ethics 49 (1):188-212.
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  7. added 2021-05-13
    William James’s Democratic Aesthetics.Stephen S. Bush - 2021 - Journal of Religious Ethics 49 (1):90-111.
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  8. added 2021-05-13
    Cultural Appropriation in Bioregionalism and the Need for a Decolonial Ethics of Place.Joseph Wiebe - 2021 - Journal of Religious Ethics 49 (1):138-158.
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  9. added 2021-05-13
    The Normative Project of Postcolonial Approaches.Eunyoung Hwang - 2021 - Journal of Religious Ethics 49 (1):112-137.
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  10. added 2021-05-13
    Review of The Evolution of Moral Progress: A Biocultural Theory by Allen Buchanan and Russell Powell. [REVIEW]Michael Brownstein & Daniel Kelly - 2019 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science Review of Books 1:1-14.
    Allen Buchanan and Russel Powell’s The Evolution of Moral Progress (EMP) is likely to become a landmark. It adeptly builds on much of the recent empirical work, weaving it together with philosophical material drawn from a series of essays published by the two authors. EMP makes the case that moral progress is not only consistent with human psychology but—under some conditions—likely. At its heart is a careful, well-developed rebuttal to the idea that there are evolved constraints endogenous to human minds (...)
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  11. added 2021-05-13
    Review of The Evolution of Moral Progress: A Biocultural Theory by Allen Buchanan and Russell Powell. [REVIEW]Michael Brownstein & Daniel Kelly - 2019 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science Review of Books 1:1-14.
    Allen Buchanan and Russel Powell’s The Evolution of Moral Progress (EMP) is likely to become a landmark. It adeptly builds on much of the recent empirical work, weaving it together with philosophical material drawn from a series of essays published by the two authors. EMP makes the case that moral progress is not only consistent with human psychology but—under some conditions—likely. At its heart is a careful, well-developed rebuttal to the idea that there are evolved constraints endogenous to human minds (...)
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  12. added 2021-05-13
    Review of The Meaning of Disgust by Colin McGinn. [REVIEW]Daniel Kelly - 2012 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 1:1-8.
    Colin McGinn's The Meaning of Disgust numbers among several scholarly books on disgust that have been published in the last couple of years (including, in the interest of full and up front disclosure, one by the writer of this review). McGinn's book argues for a coherent, if incredible, account of the essence of disgustingness and of the emotion of disgust, and reflects on the potential significance of that account for different areas of human concern. It also bears many of the (...)
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  13. added 2021-05-13
    Engaging with Ethics: Ethical Inquiry for Teachers.Mark Freakley & Gilbert Burgh - 2000 - Katoomba NSW 2780, Australia: Social Sciences Press.
    This book adopts a ‘community of inquiry’ approach to the teaching of professional ethics to pre-service teachers. It is designed to assist students to bridge the gap between ethical theories and their practical experiences as beginning professionals. The first part of the book articulates the framework for the approach taken while the second part provides a series of fictional ethical vignettes set consisting of school teachers and their students in a local school.
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  14. added 2021-05-12
    The Ego Amidst Power, Lies and Realities.Marcos Wagner Da Cunha - manuscript
    Starting from a critique of the Kantian condemnation of any and all lies, an analysis is made of the relationship between the decision to reveal the truth and the instances of power in which the subject is inserted. Given the introjection of power structures and their role in the deliberations of the Conscious Self, we conclude that lying implies a recognition of the power of the figure to whom one lies. The light act of lying results in irreparable damage to (...)
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  15. added 2021-05-12
    Stereotyping as Discrimination: Why Thoughts Can Be Discriminatory.Erin Beeghly - forthcoming - Social Epistemology.
    Can we treat people in a discriminatory way in virtue of how we think about them? In this essay, I argue that the answer is yes. According to the constitutive claim, stereotyping constitutes discrimination, either sometimes or always. This essay defends the constitutive claim and explores the deeper justifications for it. I also sketch the constitutive claim’s larger ethical significance. One upshot is that we can wrongfully discriminate against (or in favor of) others in thought, even if we keep our (...)
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  16. added 2021-05-12
    On the Epistemic Costs of Friendship: Against the Encroachment View.Catherine Rioux - forthcoming - Episteme.
    I defend the thesis that friendship can constitutively require epistemic irrationality against a recent, forceful challenge, raised by proponents of moral and pragmatic encroachment. Defenders of the "encroachment strategy" argue that exemplary friends who are especially slow to believe that their friends have acted wrongly are simply sensitive to the high prudential or moral costs of falsely believing in their friends' guilt. Drawing on psychological work on epistemic motivation (and in particular on the notion of "need for closure"), I propose (...)
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  17. added 2021-05-12
    Lying to the Nazi at the Door: A Thomistic Reframing of the Classic Moral Dilemma.Stewart Clem - 2021 - Journal of Religious Ethics 49 (1):6-32.
    Moral philosophers and theologians have long debated the classic moral dilemma of lying to an intruder in order to save a refugee. This dilemma presents an especially difficult challenge to those who reject consequentialist reasoning. Many contemporary defenders of Thomas Aquinas have argued that lying is never permissible under any circumstances, but none has offered a satisfactory answer to the question of what one ought to do when facing such a dilemma. I argue that there can be no morally satisfying (...)
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  18. added 2021-05-12
    Kierkegaard and Kant on Radical Evil and the Highest Good: Virtue, Happiness, and the Kingdom of God.Roe Fremstedal - 2014 - Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan.
    Kierkegaard and Kant on Radical Evil and the Highest Good is a major study of Kierkegaard's relation to Kant that gives a comprehensive account of radical evil and the highest good, two controversial doctrines with important consequences for ethics and religion.
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  19. added 2021-05-11
    On the Expressive Limits of Kant's Universalizability Tests.Samuel Kahn - forthcoming - Kant-Studien:1-6.
    My goal in this piece is to show that there is a problem lurking in the shadows of recent attempts to derive positive duties from Kant’s so-called universalizability tests and, further, to show that the most obvious way of fixing these attempts renders them unable to fulfill their function. I shall begin by motivating and explaining such an attempt.
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  20. added 2021-05-11
    Leading a Professional Learning Community for Teacher Educators: Inquiry Into College Principals Motives and Challenges.Maria Gutman - forthcoming - Teacher Development.
    The purpose of this narrative study is to trace the process whereby Israeli Academic College of Education principals lead Professional Learning Communities (PLC) for teacher educators. The focus is on the unique situation in which various different roles (administrator/facilitator/learner) are integrated during this process. Seven semi-structured interviews underwent a thematic analysis that indicated two parallel journeys of PLC leadership: a journey of co-leading a PLC and cultivating creativity, and a journey of crystallizing intellectual identity and image through leading PLCs. The (...)
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  21. added 2021-05-11
    Controlling Hope.Michael Milona & Katie Stockdale - forthcoming - Ratio.
    This paper considers the kind of control we exercise over hope. In doing so, we situate our discussion against the backdrop of the growing literature on hope’s nature. Several important analyses of hope have the implication that, once the relevant desires and beliefs for hope are present, an agent can (sometimes) directly control whether they hope. But we argue against the possibility of direct control. This is because hope bears systematic relationships with fear and despair; and the view that we (...)
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  22. added 2021-05-11
    Social Animals and the Potential for Morality: On the Cultural Exaptation of Behavioral Capacities Required for Normativity.Estelle Palao - 2021 - In Johan De Smedt & Helen De Cruz (eds.), Empirically Engaged Evolutionary Ethics. Springer - Synthese Library. pp. 111-134.
    To help bridge the explanatory gap of how normativity branched off into morality in the course of evolutionary history, I claim that morality is a form of social normativity, specifically a form of cultural normativity. Furthermore, with the origins of its behavioral capacities rooted in normative practice, morality should be considered as an exaptation, a secondary adaptation shaped through cultural selection and evolution. Cultural selection pressures differ across social groups, as well as various species. Empirical evidence has shown that animals (...)
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  23. added 2021-05-10
    Address, Interests, and Directed Duties.Simon Căbulea May - forthcoming - Journal of Applied Philosophy.
    Rowan Cruft offers an addressive account of directed duties and claim-rights. He claims that the direction of a duty is constituted by two requirements of address between the parties: the right holder must conceive of the action as `to be done to me’ and the duty bearer must conceive of it as to be ‘done to you’. Cruft also argues against accounts of direction and claim-rights that reduce the relation between the parties to nonrelational facts. One such reductive account is (...)
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  24. added 2021-05-10
    Why Strict Compliance?Simon Căbulea May - forthcoming - In David Sobel, Steven Wall & Peter Vallentyne (eds.), Oxford Studies in Political Philosophy, volume 7. New York, NY, USA: pp. 227-264.
    I present an interpretation of ideal theory that is grounded in the idea of society as a fair scheme of cooperation, which Rawls describes as the most fundamental idea of justice as fairness. A key element of the Rawlsian idea of cooperation, I claim, is that the individual participants of a genuinely cooperative scheme—whatever its scale—are morally accountable to each other for complying with the scheme’s rules. This means that each participant has the moral standing to demand of the others (...)
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  25. added 2021-05-10
    Toward a Theory of Offense: Should You Feel Offended?Chang Liu - forthcoming - Philosophy.
    The feeling of being offended, as a moral emotion, plays a key role in issues such as slurs, the offense principle, ethics of humor, etc. However, no adequate theory of offense has been developed in the literature, and it remains unclear what questions such a theory should answer. This paper attempts to fill the gap by performing two tasks. The first task is to clarify and summarize the questions of offense into two kinds, the descriptive questions (e.g., what features differentiate (...)
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  26. added 2021-05-10
    Making Moral Principles Suit Yourself.Matthew Stanley, Paul Henne, Laura Niemi, Walter Sinnott-Armstrong & Felipe De Brigard - 2021 - Psychonomic Bulletin & Review 1.
    Normative ethical theories and religious traditions offer general moral principles for people to follow. These moral principles are typically meant to be fixed and rigid, offering reliable guides for moral judgment and decision-making. In two preregistered studies, we found consistent evidence that agreement with general moral principles shifted depending upon events recently accessed in memory. After recalling their own personal violations of moral principles, participants agreed less strongly with those very principles—relative to participants who recalled events in which other people (...)
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  27. added 2021-05-10
    Desires, Interests, and Claim-Rights.Simon Căbulea May - 2017 - In Mark McBride (ed.), New Essays on the Nature of Rights. Oxford, UK: pp. 85-98.
    Leif Wenar’s kind-desire theory states that an individual holds a claim-right against an agent only because she has reason to desire, as a member of a particular social or natural kind, that the agent fulfil his duty. He argues that the kind-desire theory is superior to the interest theory of claim-rights, which states that an individual holds a claim-right against an agent only because his duty is in some manner beneficial to her. I compare the merits of the kind-desire theory (...)
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  28. added 2021-05-10
    Liberal Neutrality and Civil Marriage.Simon Căbulea May - 2016 - In Elizabeth Brake (ed.), After Marriage: Rethinking Marital Relationships. New York, NY, USA: pp. 9-28.
    A powerful objection to civil marriage claims that it violates the principle of liberal neutrality because the institution implies state endorsement of matrimony as an ideal type of personal relationship. The chapter argues that this neutrality objection is cogent only if certain empirical conditions fail to be met. These conditions concern both the nature and the effects of the social norms that stipulate the intentions and beliefs necessary for good faith entrance into marriage. In certain circumstances, the presumptively permanent nature (...)
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  29. added 2021-05-10
    Compromise.Simon Căbulea May - 2013 - In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Hoboken, NJ, USA:
    Compromise is an inescapable part of human coexistence, from the mundane choices of domestic life to the grand stage of world politics. Notwithstanding its ubiquity, compromise raises a number of philosophical puzzles. One kind of problem is conceptual: what is compromise, and how might it differ from similar social phenomena, such as consensus and bargaining? A second kind of problem concerns the murky ethics of compromise, particularly on matters of moral significance. Compromise may have a salutary role in facilitating cooperation, (...)
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  30. added 2021-05-10
    Bohman on Domination and Epistemic Injustice.Simon Căbulea May - 2012 - Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 8 (1):7-12.
    James Bohman proposes a republican conception of epistemic injustice as an alternative to Miranda Fricker’s virtue theoretical account. The key element in Bohman’s approach is the concept of domination, one of the central concepts in republican political theory more generally. He claims that all cases of epistemic injustice involve forms of domination, and that institutional mechanisms of non-domination are accordingly necessary to remedy epistemic injustice. I agree with Bohman that there are important connections between domination and epistemic injustice. Nevertheless, I (...)
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  31. added 2021-05-09
    The Role of the Educator in the Just Society.Oxenberg Richard - 2007 - CAEC 12.
    In this brief article I reflect on our culture's moral ambiguity, as reflected in the popularity of such shows as The Sopranos, and argue for the need for a morally attuned philosophical education to address it.
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  32. added 2021-05-07
    Emmanuelle de Champs, Enlightenment and Utility: Bentham in French, Bentham in France (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015), Pp. Viii + 230. [REVIEW]R. J. W. Mills - forthcoming - Utilitas:1-4.
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  33. added 2021-05-07
    Morality as Cognitive Scaffolding in the Nucleus of the Mesoamerican Cosmovision.Alfredo Robles Zamora - 2021 - In J. De Smedt & H. De Cruz (eds.), Empirically Engaged Evolutionary Ethics. Synthese Library. Oxford, Reino Unido:
    The aim of this chapter is to investigate changes and continuities of human moral systems from an evolutionary and socio-historical perspective. Specifically, I will argue that these systems can be approached through the lens of non-genetic inheritance systems and niche construction. I will examine morality from a comparative socio-historical perspective. From this, I suggest that these inheritance systems are cognitively scaffolded, and that these scaffolds are part of the nucleus of the historical Mesoamerican cosmovision.
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  34. added 2021-05-07
    Book Review: Christine Korsgaard, Fellow Creatures: Our Obligations to the Other Animals. [REVIEW]A. G. Holdier - 2020 - Between the Species 23 (1).
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  35. added 2021-05-06
    Perceiving Utilitarian Gradients: Heart Rate Variability and Self-Regulatory Effort in the Moral Dilemma Task.Alejandro Rosas, Juan Pablo Bermúdez, Jorge Martínez Cotrina, David Aguilar-Pardo, Juan Carlos Caicedo Mera & Diego Mauricio Aponte - forthcoming - Social Neuroscience.
    It is not yet clear which response behavior requires self-regulatory effort in the moral dilemma task. Previous research has proposed that utilitarian responses require cognitive control, but subsequent studies have found inconsistencies with the empirical predictions of that hypothesis. In this paper we treat participants’ sensitivity to utilitarian gradients as a measure of performance. We confronted participants (N = 82) with a set of five dilemmas evoking a gradient of mean utilitarian responses in a 4-point scale and collected data on (...)
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  36. added 2021-05-06
    Dual-Process Reflective Equilibrium: Rethinking the Interplay Between Intuition and Reflection in Moral Reasoning.Dario Cecchini - forthcoming - Philosophical Explorations:1-17.
    Dual-process theories of the mind emphasize how reasoning is an interplay between intuitive and reflective thinking. This paper aims to understand how the two types of processing interact in the moral domain. According to a ‘default-interventionist’ model of moral reasoning intuition and reflection are conflicting cognitions: intuitive thinking would elicit heuristic and deontological responses, whereas reflection would favour utilitarian judgements. However, the evidence for the default interventionist view is inconclusive and challenged by a growing amount of counterevidence in recent years. (...)
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  37. added 2021-05-06
    Imagination is the Sixth Sense (Phantasia).Stephen Asma & Paul Giamatti - 2021 - Aeon.
    Actor Paul Giamatti and philosopher Stephen Asma collaborate to describe the imagination (phantasia) as a form of embodied cognition. They explore the actor's ability to replicate embodied affective states and communicate those to audiences that are capable of catching (via emotional contagion) those affective states. The role of social affordances in imaginative work is explored. Finally, the role of imagination in political conspiracy thinking is considered.
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  38. added 2021-05-06
    Da autoformação no processo educacional entre a conformação e a autotransformação: Do jogo sociocultural e a inter-relação envolvendo modus vivendi e modus essendi.Luiz Carlos Mariano Da Rosa - 2021 - São Paulo, SP, Brasil: PZP - Politikón Zôon Publicações.
    Recuperando a noção de Paidéia, legado grego, a pesquisa em questão, detendo-se nos indícios do ideal da autoformação, para cujas fronteiras converge o contexto sociocultural da atualidade, discorre sobre o processo pedagógico que, imbricado em uma rede de relações que envolve as formas simbólicas mediante as quais o homem constrói o mundo, estruturalizando a realidade, se movimenta, no decorrer da história, oscilando entre a tendência que ora prioriza a formação individual, ora absolutiza o aspecto social, objetos de investigação no Capítulo (...)
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  39. added 2021-05-06
    Principles of Disagreement, the Practical Case for Epistemic Self-Trust, and Why the Two Don't Get Along.Simon Barker - 2020 - TRAMES 24 (3):381-401.
    This paper discusses the normative structure of principles that require belief-revision in the face of disagreement, the role of self-trust in our epistemic lives, and the tensions that arise between the two. Section 2 argues that revisionary principles of disagreement share a general normative structure such that they prohibit continued reliance upon the practices via which one came to hold the beliefs under dispute. Section 3 describes an affective mode of epistemic self-trust that can be characterised as one’s having an (...)
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  40. added 2021-05-05
    Self-Deception as a Moral Failure.Jordan MacKenzie - forthcoming - The Philosophical Quarterly.
    In this paper, I defend the view that self-deception is a moral failure. Instead of saying that self-deception is bad because it undermines our moral character or leads to morally deleterious consequences, as has been argued by Butler, Kant, Smith, and others, I argue the distinctive badness of self-deception lies in the tragic relationship that it bears to our own values. On the one hand, self-deception is motivated by what we value. On the other hand, it prevents us from valuing (...)
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  41. added 2021-05-05
    Can We Un-Forgive?Monique Wonderly - forthcoming - Philosophers' Imprint.
    Despite the recent explosion of philosophical literature on forgiveness, relatively few theorists have addressed the possibility of un-forgiving someone for a moral violation. And among those who have addressed the question, “Can we un-forgive?” we find little consensus. In this paper, I consider whether and in what sense forgiveness is rescindable, retractable, or otherwise reversible. In other words, I consider what it might mean to say that a victim who forgave her offender for a particular act of wrongdoing later un-forgave (...)
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  42. added 2021-05-05
    Attachment, Addiction, and Vices of Valuing.Monique Wonderly - forthcoming - In Edward Harcourt (ed.), Attachment and Character: Attachment Theory and the Developmental Psychology of Vice and Virtue. Oxford, UK:
    Addiction and certain varieties of interpersonal attachment share strikingly similar psycho-behavioral structures. Neuroscientists, psychologists, and philosophers have often adduced such similarities between addiction and attachment to argue that many typical cases of romantic love represent addictions to one’s partner and thus might be appropriate candidates for medical treatment. In this paper, I argue for the relatively neglected thesis that some paradigmatic cases of addiction are aptly characterized as emotional attachments to their objects. This has implications for how we should understand (...)
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  43. added 2021-05-05
    Grounding Confucian Moral Psychology in Rasa Theory: A Commentary on Shun Kwong-Loi’s “Anger, Compassion, and the Distinction Between First and Third-Person.”.Lee Wilson - forthcoming - Australasian Philosophical Review 6 (1).
    Shun Kwong-loi argues that the distinction between first- and third-person points of view does not play as explanatory a role in our moral psychology as has been supposed by contemporary philosophical discussions. He draws insightfully from the Confucian tradition to better elucidate our everyday experiences of moral emotions, arguing that it offers an alternative and more faithful perspective on our experiences of anger and compassion. However, unlike the distinction between first- and third-person points of view, Shun’s descriptions of anger and (...)
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  44. added 2021-05-05
    The Social Account of Humour.Daniel Abrahams - forthcoming - Canadian Journal of Philosophy.
    Philosophical accounts of humour standardly account for humour in terms of what happens within a person. On these internalist accounts, humour is to be understood in terms of cognition, perception, and sensation. These accounts, while valuable, are poorly-situated to engage the social functions of humour. They have difficulty engaging why we value humour, why we use it define ourselves and our friendships, and why it may be essential to our self-esteem. In opposition to these internal accounts, I offer a social (...)
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  45. added 2021-05-05
    Morality as an Evolutionary Exaptation.Marcus Arvan - 2021 - In Johan De Smedt & Helen De Cruz (eds.), Empirically Engaged Evolutionary Ethics. Springer - Synthese Library. pp. 89-109.
    The dominant theory of the evolution of moral cognition across a variety of fields is that moral cognition is a biological adaptation to foster social cooperation. This chapter argues, to the contrary, that moral cognition is likely an evolutionary exaptation: a form of cognition where neurobiological capacities selected for in our evolutionary history for a variety of different reasons—many unrelated to social cooperation—were put to a new, prosocial use after the fact through individual rationality, learning, and the development and transmission (...)
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  46. added 2021-05-04
    LOVE, IDENTIFICATION AND EQUALITY: RATIONAL PROBLEMS IN HARRY FRANKFURT'S CONCEPT OF PERSON.Martin Montoya - 2016 - Appraisal 11 (1):56-60.
    Harry Frankfurt has published On Inequality, but this is not the first time he has written about this subject. Frankfurt already criticized a rationalistic notion of equality on other occasions (Frankfurt, 1987 & 1997). In these works he says a rationalistic notion of equality cannot fit in with our belief that agents possess their own volitional necessities, which shape volitional structures of the human will. However, Frankfurt's explanatory connection between volitions, love and identification make it difficult to talk about personal (...)
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  47. added 2021-05-03
    Choice Functions and Hard Choices.M. Van Hees, A. Jitendranath & R. I. Luttens - forthcoming - Journal of Mathematical Economics.
    A hard choice is a situation in which an agent is unable to make a justifiable choice from a given menu of alternatives. Our objective is to present a systematic treatment of the axiomatic structure of such situations. To do so, we draw on and contribute to the study of choice functions that can be indecisive, i.e., that may fail to select a non-empty set for some menus. In this more general framework, we present new characterizations of two well-known choice (...)
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  48. added 2021-05-01
    Group Agents and Moral Status: What Can We Owe to Organizations?Adam Lovett & Stefan Riedener - forthcoming - Canadian Journal of Philosophy.
    Organizations have neither a right to the vote nor a weighty right to life. We need not enfranchise Goldman Sachs. We should feel few scruples in dissolving Standard Oil. But they are not without rights altogether. We can owe it to them to keep our promises. We can owe them debts of gratitude. Thus, we can owe some things to organizations. But we cannot owe them everything we can owe to people. They seem to have a peculiar, fragmented moral status. (...)
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  49. added 2021-05-01
    Arte culinario y creación poética en Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz.Gallegos Ordorica Sergio & Ortiz Hinojosa Sofia - 2021 - Critica 53 (157):13-44.
    In this paper, we explore the connections between the culinary art and the poetic work by Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz. In particular, following a detailed study of the analogies between, on the one hand, food and culinary preparation, and on the other hand, poetry and composition, we show that culinary art functions as cause and catalyst of Sor Juana’s poetic creation. Also, we show that, for the hieronymite nun, there is an intimate and profound relation between good seasoning, (...)
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  50. added 2021-05-01
    Introduction: Symposium on Stichter’s The Skillfulness of Virtue.Noell Birondo - 2021 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 24:1-3.
    The ‘skill model’ of virtue has received increasing levels of attention over the past decade, at least partly due to its prominence in the work of Julia Annas. Building on this earlier work, some of which is his own, Matt Stichter now delivers a bold and empirically grounded new book, The Skillfulness of Virtue, an extended defense of the skill model of virtue that utilizes the available psychological research on self-regulation and practical expertise. Stichter examines the idea (familiar in antiquity) (...)
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