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  1. The Novel as a Performing Art.Alexey Aliyev - forthcoming - Philosophia:1-15.
    The consensus is that the novel—along with painting, sculpture, and architecture—should be categorized as a non-performing art. In this essay, I argue that such categorization is misguided: In fact, there is good reason to categorize the novel as a performing art. I begin by showing that x is a performing art if the following conditions are satisfied: x is an art and to fully appreciate a work of x, it is necessary to experientially engage with a performance or a performance-like (...)
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  2. Work and Object, by Peter Lamarque. [REVIEW]Gemma Celestino - forthcoming - Disputatio.
  3. Realismo estructural óntico en H.P. Lovecraft.Leonardo Arriagada - 2020 - Revista Laboratorio (21):1-18.
    Este artículo pretende mostrar que, a través de la obra de Lovecraft, es posible ilustrar una forma de realismo estructural óntico (REO). Se postula que la literatura de Lovecraft permite ejemplificar una ontología orientada hacia las relaciones (entre entidades), y no a las entidades mismas. Además, puesto que en esta forma de REO las entidades se definirían por sus relaciones, se concluye que estas deberían ser abstractas, habilitadas para contar con todas las características que extrínsecamente les sean asignadas en una (...)
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  4. The Ontology of Graphically-Fixed Literature.Bradley Elicker - 2020 - British Journal of Aesthetics 60 (1):13-26.
    Typically, literature is defined ontologically as linguistically-fixed texts consisting of specific words and word order. However, some have noted that this condition is too strict for linguistically-fluid works such as the Iliad where the words and word order differ in their various instances. I argue that it is not strict enough for some works of literature, such as pattern poetry and the novels of Irvin Welsh and Mark Z. Danielewski, that have a further ontological condition. In that the graphic features (...)
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  5. Heroes, Tyrants, Howls.Steven Knepper - 2020 - Renascence 72 (1):3-23.
    In recent decades, the philosopher William Desmond has offered both insightful readings of individual tragedies and a striking reformulation of old Aristotelian standbys like hamartia and catharsis. This reformulation grows out of his wider philosophy of the “between,” which stresses humans’ fundamental receptivity or “porosity.” For Desmond, tragedy strips away characters’ self-determination and returns them to porosity. The audience is returned to porosity as well, a process of exposure that can be harrowing, and at times leads to despair, but that (...)
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  6. On the Varieties of Abstract Objects.James E. Davies - 2019 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 97 (4):809-823.
    I reconcile the spatiotemporal location of repeatable artworks and impure sets with the non-location of natural numbers despite all three being varieties of abstract objects. This is possible because, while the identity conditions for all three can be given by abstraction principles, in the former two cases spatiotemporal location is a congruence for the equivalence relation featuring in the relevant principle, whereas in the latter it is not. I then generalize this to other ‘physical’ properties like shape, mass, and causal (...)
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  7. Singular Reference in Fictional Discourse?Manuel García-Carpintero - 2019 - Disputatio 11 (54):143-177.
    Singular terms used in fictions for fictional characters raise well-known philosophical issues, explored in depth in the literature. But philosophers typically assume that names already in use to refer to “moderatesized specimens of dry goods” cause no special problem when occurring in fictions, behaving there as they ordinarily do in straightforward assertions. In this paper I continue a debate with Stacie Friend, arguing against this for the exceptionalist view that names of real entities in fictional discourse don’t work there as (...)
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  8. Стосунки з Богом у поезії Миколи Вінграновського.Svitlana Bohdan - 2018 - NaUKMA Researh Papers. Literary Studies 1:44-48.
    Статтю присвячено сакральним мотивам у поезії М. Вінграновського. Розглянуто правопис слова «Бог» у ранніх і пізніших поезіях автора, вказано на тексти з релігійною образністю і тематикою (зокрема проаналізовано неопубліковані рукописи). Наведено свідчення сучасників поета про його стосунки з Богом. Зроблено спробу показати, що засвідчена заангажованість М. Вінграновського в релігійний дискурс дає підстави розгортати інтерпретацію його поезій також і в межах цього дискурсу, зокрема – в аспекті поєднання однини і множини на мовному рівні, а також в аспекті відчуття загальної всеєдності як (...)
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  9. Функційність топоніма Москва в українському поетичному дискурсі.Yuliia Brailko - 2018 - Language: Classic – Modern – Postmodern 4:5-19.
    У статті наведено результати дослідження функційного призначення топоніма Москва в українському поетичному дискурсі від давньої доби до сьогодні. Визначено, що найважливіша його функція – ідеологічна, вона є різновекторною та безпосередньо пов’язана з авторською оцінкою. Конотації власної назви Москва детерміновані інтерлінгвальними чинниками та мають великий діапазон – від максимально меліоративних до максимально пейоративних.
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  10. The Promethean Form: A Poet's Ontological Metamorphosis in Emerson's "Self-Reliance" and "The Poet".Trent Michael Sanders - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (1):222-229.
    What does Emerson want for himself and for us, or, put another way, what does he do in his writings as a whole? Can we understand Emerson's writings today? One critic, F. O. Matthiessen, in his American Renaissance: Art and Expression in the Age of Emerson and Whitman, pithily remarks that some of Emerson's philosophical essays are "generally unreadable";1 Len Gougeon, however, argues that we can know something about Emerson. Gougeon suggests that Emerson emphasizes the individual and the American political (...)
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  11. What Instances of Novels Are.Alexey Aliyev - 2017 - Philosophia 45 (1):163-183.
    The consensus is that novels can be fully appreciated only through an experiential engagement with their well-formed instances. But what are the entities that serve as such instances? According to the orthodox view, these entities are primarily inscriptions—concrete texts written or printed on something or displayed on the screen of some electronic device. In this paper, I argue that this view is misguided, since well-formed instances of a novel must manifest certain sonic properties, but such properties cannot be manifested by (...)
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  12. Non-Fictional Narrators in Fictional Narratives.Christian Folde - 2017 - British Journal of Aesthetics 57 (4):389-405.
    This paper is about non-fictional objects in fictions and their role as narrators. Two central claims are advanced. In part 1 it is argued that non-fictional objects such as you and me can be part of fictions. This commonsensical idea is elaborated and defended against objections. Building on it, it is argued in part 2 that non-fictional objects can be characters and narrators in fictional narratives. As a consequence, three fundamental and popular claims concerning narrators are rejected. In particular, it (...)
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  13. How Can Each Word Be Irreplaceable?: Is Coleridge's Claim Absurd?Paul Magee - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (2):400-415.
    One often hears a version of the following: “A poem is never finished, just abandoned.” I have always found this proposition irksome. The fact that Paul Valéry seems to be the source of it, in something like the above form, makes me feel a certain trepidation in writing this. But I do find myself thinking, when I hear people say that their poems are never finished, only abandoned: why don’t you just finish them? I want a poem to be finished. (...)
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  14. Multilevel Poetry Translation as a Problem-Solving Task.Pedro Ata & Joao Queiroz - 2016 - Cognitive Semiotics 9 (2):139-147.
    Poems are treated by translators as hierarchical multilevel systems. Here we propose the notion of “multilevel poetry translation” to characterize such cases of poetry translation in terms of selection and rebuilding of a multilevel system of constraints across languages. Different levels of a poem correspond to different sets of components that asymmetrically constrain each other (e. g., grammar, lexicon, syntactic construction, prosody, rhythm, typography, etc.). This perspective allows a poem to be approached as a thinking-tool: an “experimental lab” which submits (...)
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  15. Creativity and Pedagogy in Leavis.Michael Bell - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):171-188.
    I never heard or met F. R. Leavis personally, but like many others I have felt the impact of his writing as teaching and would like to reflect on its nature in that regard. His published criticism is strongly inflected toward the purposes of teaching. His notorious exclusions, for example, of authors he knew very well are partly directed to the practical consideration of how much a conscientious student can read attentively in a three-year degree syllabus, and what reading in (...)
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  16. Unlocking the Traumatic Through the Psychedelic in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest.Mongia Besbes - 2016 - Journal of Advances in Humanities and Social Sciences 3 (2):156-167.
    This is an attempt to investigate the causal relationship existing between the psychedelic literary genre in fiction and the application of trauma theory in the study of One Flew over the Cuckoo's Nest. Trauma theory, which is a psychological theory in essence; has been widely linked to the study of literature since traumatic responses take narrative forms. Scientifically, many studies have proven that the psychedelic trip leads to a deepened exploration of the unconscious tracing latent emotional traumas. Henceforth, I am (...)
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  17. Thinking with Literature: Towards a Cognitive Criticism.Terence Cave - 2016 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Thinking with Literature offers a succinct introduction to a cognitive literary criticsm, broad in scope but focusing on a particular cluster of approaches, some of which have so far been little used. Explanatory chapters and sections alternate with close readings of literary texts from a wide range of different periods and genres. The literary readings are not mere 'examples' of cognitive topics, still less of hypotheses in cognitive science: the central argument is that cognitive criticism must draw its primary energies (...)
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  18. Leavis and Wittgenstein.Bernard Harrison - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):206-225.
    I think of myself as an anti-philosopher, which is what a literary critic ought to be.For a number of years my work has been partly occupied with the examination of various points of contact between philosophy and literature. It involved, however, no more than marginal reference to the work of F. R. Leavis, certainly because of a culpable lack on my part of extended acquaintance with his work, but also to some extent, no doubt, because of Leavis’s own resolute denial (...)
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  19. The Problem of Modernism and Critical Refusal: Bradley and Lamarque on Form/Content Unity.Owen Hulatt - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (1):47-59.
    In this article I revisit A. C. Bradley's account of form/content unity through the lens of both Peter Kivy's and Peter Lamarque's recent work on Bradley's lecture “Poetry for Poetry's Sake.” I argue that Lamarque gives a superior account of Bradley's argument. However, Lamarque claims that form/content unity should be understood as an imposition applied by the reader to poetry. Working with the counterexample of modernist poetry, I throw doubt on both this claim and some associated presuppositions found in Lamarque's (...)
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  20. Rethinking Leavis.Chris Joyce - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):137-156.
    “What is a word?”1 The question was not asked in the expectation of a definitive answer, for words of their nature—as he saw—cannot readily provide one. It is of course a truism that all definitions are made of words, but Leavis was apt to point out that the meanings of many important words resist full lexical definition. Their being thus resistant is often a mark of their importance.2 By a very different route, Wittgenstein arrived at an “answer” akin to that (...)
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  21. Poesia, instante vertical e solidão na fenomenologia poética de Gaston Bachelard.Fernando Machado - 2016 - Ekstasis: Revista de Hermenêutica E Fenomenologia.
    O presente artigo ambiciona discutir dois conceitos importantes presentes na última fase da filosofia poética de Gaston Bachelard, onde o pensador adotou o método fenomenológico das imagens poéticas, são eles: solidão e instante vertical. Logo em seguida, demonstraremos de que modo esses dois conceitos que são, diga-se de passagem, um tanto quanto curiosos, se conectam e, em certa medida, autorizam o pensador a definir precisamente o que é essa poesia produzida pelo artista, bem como, o impacto de uma obra poética (...)
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  22. Tempo de solidão e de leitura para a construção do Ser do homem na fenomenologia poética de Gaston Bachelard.Fernando Machado - 2016 - Paralaxe 6:83-96.
    We intend with this article demonstrate how Bachelard addresses the issue that focuses on the constitution and reconstruction of the Being of man poetically in his final phenomenological thought. Therefore, I shall set out briefly what kind of poetic phenomenology is that desired by the author, then highlight the importance to and primacy of vertical temporality cultivated by poets and, finally, show how from "loneliness of another" in case, the poet, I blame myself for my own loneliness in the construction (...)
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  23. Foucault and Kripke on the Proper Names of Authors.Christopher Mole - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (2):383-398.
    The semantic issues that Saul Kripke addressed in Naming and Necessity overlap substantially with those that were addressed by Michel Foucault in “What Is an Author?”. The present essay examines their area of overlap, with a view to showing that each of these works affords a perspective on the other, from which facets that are usually obscure can be brought into view. It shows that Foucault needs to take some assumptions from Kripke’s theory of naming in order to secure one (...)
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  24. Paradise on the Cheap. Ascriptivism About Ficta.Michele Paolini Paoletti - 2016 - In Mauro Antonelli & Marian David (eds.), Existence, Fiction, Assumption. Meinongian Themes and the History of Austrian Philosophy. Meinong Studies, vol. VI. de Gruyter. pp. 99-140.
    In this article I shall present a Meinong-inspired theory of fictional objects. This theory is based on two ideas: fictional objects are mental objects, i.e., they depend for their identity conditions on minded subjects thinking of them; they bear properties in two different ways, i.e., by instantiating properties and by having properties “ascribed” to them. In my perspective, ascription relations hold (at least) between an object, a property and a minded subject. After having presented some data about fictional discourse, I (...)
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  25. Story Size.Ben Blumson - 2015 - Philosophical Papers 44 (2):121-137.
    The shortest stories are zero words long. There is no maximum length.
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  26. Investigations Into the Phenomenology and the Ontology of the Work of Art: What Are Artworks and How Do We Experience Them?Peer F. Bundgaard & Frederik Stjernfelt (eds.) - 2015 - Springer Verlag.
    ​This book investigates the nature of aesthetic experience and aesthetic objects. Written by leading philosophers, psychologists, literary scholars and semioticians, the book addresses two intertwined issues. The first is related to the phenomenology of aesthetic experience: The understanding of how human beings respond to artworks, how we process linguistic or visual information, and what properties in artworks trigger aesthetic experiences. The examination of the properties of aesthetic experience reveals essential aspects of our perceptual, cognitive, and semiotic capacities. The second issue (...)
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  27. The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Literature.Noël Carroll & John Gibson (eds.) - 2015 - Routledge.
    _The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Literature_ is an in-depth examination of literature through a philosophical lens, written by distinguished figures across the major divisions of philosophy. Its 40 newly-commissioned essays are divided into six sections: historical foundations what is literature? aesthetics & appreciation meaning & interpretation metaphysics & epistemology ethics & political theory _The Companion_ opens with a comprehensive historical overview of the philosophy of literature, including chapters on the study’s ancient origins up to the 18 th -20 th (...)
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  28. Narrative and Essayistic Temporalities.E. Di Bona - 2015 - In Ch Wampole S. Ercolino (ed.), Narration and Reflection, Special Issue of Compar(a)ison: An International Journal of Comparative Literature. Peter Lang. pp. 49-62.
    The issues of this essay concern whether there are ways of experiencing time that are specific to narration and whether such ways can also be applied to the experience of time in reflection. In order to tackle these issues, we shall compare and contrast the experience of time in life with both the temporal experiences of narration and the temporal experiences of reflection. We shall begin, then, with a discussion on what the “experience of time” is, in the attempt of (...)
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  29. “But Is It Science Fiction?”: Science Fiction and a Theory of Genre.Simon J. Evnine - 2015 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 39 (1):1-28.
    If science fiction is a genre, then attempts to think about the nature of science fiction will be affected by one’s understanding of what genres are. I shall examine two approaches to genre, one dominant but inadequate, the other better, but only occasionally making itself seen. I shall then discuss several important, interrelated issues, focusing particularly on science fiction : what it is for a work to belong to a genre, the semantics of genre names, the validity of attempts to (...)
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  30. Lamarque, Peter. The Opacity of Narrative. Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield, 2014, Xv + 213 Pp., £19.95 Paper. [REVIEW]Jonathan Gilmore - 2015 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 73 (3):349-351.
  31. Restrained Excess: Where Sophistication Meets the Grotesque.Rune Graulund - 2015 - Philosophy and Literature 39 (2):338-355.
    Readily conjured images of “grotesque” behavior—such as, say, vomiting on one’s plate during dinner or fornicating in public—are hard to envisage as acts of “sophistication.” In fact it seems that the grotesque constitutes the exact opposite of sophistication. For whereas the grotesque is loud and insistent, “characteristically [evoking] a sudden shock,” sophistication is characterized by that which is subdued and refined.1 Unlike the grotesque, which is to some extent defined by spectacle, sophistication is at its finest when it remains unnoticed. (...)
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  32. Singularity and Transnational Poetics.Birgit Kaiser (ed.) - 2015 - Routledge.
  33. Kommunikative Absichten und die Ontologie des literarischen Werks.Maria E. Reicher - 2015 - In Jan Borkowski, Stefan Descher, Felicitas Ferder & Philipp David Heine (eds.), Literatur interpretieren: Interdisziplinäre Beiträge zur Theorie und Praxis. Mentis. pp. 191-217.
    In diesem Beitrag werden drei Thesen verteidigt: 1. Interpretationen literarischer Werke (im Sinne von Aussagen über die Bedeutung literarischer Werke) können richtig oder falsch sein. 2. Werke haben eine objektive Bedeutung, unabhängig von Interpretationen. 3. Die Bedeutung eines Werks wird wesentlich durch die kommunikativen Absichten der Autorin determiniert. Die Position, dass Werk- und Textbedeutungen durch tatsächliche Autorabsichten des echten Autors konstituiert werden – die Position des aktualen Intentionalismus – wird gegen eine Reihe von Einwänden und konkurrierenden Theorien verteidigt, nämlich gegen (...)
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  34. Alan H. Goldman, Philosophy and the Novel.Iris Vidmar - 2015 - Estetika 52 (1):122-127.
    A review of Alan H. Goldman´s Philosophy and the Novel.
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  35. The Cambridge Introduction to Literature and Philosophy.Anthony J. Cascardi - 2014 - Cambridge University Press.
    Literature and philosophy have long shared an interest in questions of truth, value, and form. And yet, from ancient times to the present, they have often sharply diverged, both in their approach to these questions and in their relationship to one another. Moreover, the vast differences among individual writers, historical periods, and languages pose challenges for anyone wishing to understand the relationship between them. This Introduction provides a synthetic and original guide to this vast terrain. It uncovers the deep interests (...)
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  36. Sense-Making Sound: Agamben, Longenbach, and the Question of Poetic Meaning.Dongho Cha - 2014 - Philosophy and Literature 38 (1):276-281.
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  37. Otherness: The Prevalence of the Real.Maurizio Ferraris - 2014 - Rivista di Estetica 56:87-95.
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  38. How Literature Changes the Way We Think (Review).Sean Gerard Ferrier - 2014 - Contemporary Political Theory 13 (3):e11-e14.
    Review of *How Literature Changes the Way We Think*, by Michael Mack (Continuum, 2012).
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  39. What is Fiction For?: Literary Humanism Restored.Bernard Harrison - 2014 - Indiana University Press.
    How can literature, which consists of nothing more than the description of imaginary events and situations, offer any insight into the workings of "human reality" or "the human condition"? Can mere words illuminate something that we call "reality"? Bernard Harrison answers these questions in this profoundly original work that seeks to re-enfranchise reality in the realms of art and discourse. In an ambitious account of the relationship between literature and cognition, he seeks to show how literary fiction, by deploying words (...)
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  40. Plato's Apology of Socrates, A Metaphilosophical Text.John Sellars - 2014 - Philosophy and Literature 38 (2):433-45.
    Plato’s Apology is not merely an account of Socrates’ trial, it is also a work of metaphilosophy, presenting Socrates’ understanding of the nature and function of philosophy. This is a vital part of the text’s apologetic task, for it is only with reference to Socrates’ understanding of what philosophy is that we can understand, and so justify, his seemingly antisocial behaviour. Plato presents to us Socrates’ metaphilosophy in two ways: via what Socrates says and what he does. This twofold method (...)
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  41. 6. Fiktion, Wahrheit, Referenz.Jan C. Werner - 2014 - In Tilmann Köppe & Tobias Klauk (eds.), Fiktionalität: Ein Interdisziplinäres Handbuch. De Gruyter. pp. 125-158.
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  42. Penser la création littéraire avec Paul Ricœur.Marjolaine Deschênes - 2013 - Fabula/Les Colloques.
    Philosophie de la vivification et de la fragilité, l’œuvre de Paul Ricœur est fertile pour qui veut penser la création littéraire. Cette pratique d’écriture, Ricœur l’envisage comme un procès complexe où l’écrivain s’individualise et s’altère d’un seul geste. Nous le verrons, l’écriture est à ses yeux distanciation, geste d’appropriation médiatisé. Cet écartèlement entre le propre et l’impropre fait la spécificité de l’écriture littéraire, où s’entrelacent la rationalité et l’irrationalité, le savoir et le non-savoir. Après avoir exposé ces vues, je les (...)
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  43. How to Read Literature.Terry Eagleton - 2013 - Yale University Press.
    What makes a work of literature good or bad? How freely can the reader interpret it? Could a nursery rhyme like _Baa Baa Black Sheep_ be full of concealed loathing, resentment, and aggression? In this accessible, delightfully entertaining book, Terry Eagleton addresses these intriguing questions and a host of others. _How to Read Literature _is the book of choice for students new to the study of literature and for all other readers interested in deepening their understanding and enriching their reading (...)
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  44. Swirski, Peter. Literature, Analytically Speaking: Explorations in the Theory of Interpretation, Analytic Aesthetics, and Evolution. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2010. Pp. 212. Swirski, Peter. Of Literature and Knowledge: Explorations in Narrative Thought Experiments, Evolution, and Game Theory. New York: Routledge, 2007. Pp. 196. [REVIEW]R. Ghosh & T. E. Vanhanen - 2013 - Substance 42 (2):173-178.
  45. The Menard Case and the Identity of a Literary Work of Art.Tomas Hribek - 2013 - In Tomas Koblizek, Petr Kot'átko & Martin Pokorný (eds.), Text + Work: The Menard Case. Praha, Česko: pp. 6-34.
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  46. Repeatable Artwork Sentences and Generics.Shieva Kleinschmidt & Jacob Ross - 2013 - In Christy Mag Uidhir (ed.), Art and Abstract Objects. Oxford University Press. pp. 125.
    We seem to talk about repeatable artworks, like symphonies, films, and novels, all the time. We say things like, "The Moonlight Sonata has three movements" and "Duck Soup makes me laugh". How are these sentences to be understood? We argue against the simple subject/predicate view, on which the subjects of the sentences refer to individuals and the sentences are true iff the referents of the subjects have the properties picked out by the predicates. We then consider two alternative responses that (...)
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  47. Art, Metaphysics, & the Paradox of Standards.Christy Mag Uidhir - 2013 - In Art & Abstract Objects. Oxford University Press.
    I consider the field of aesthetics to be at its most productive and engaging when adopting a broadly philosophically informative approach to its core issues (e.g., shaping and testing putative art theoretic commitments against the relevant standard models employed in philosophy of language, metaphysics, and philosophy of mind) and to be at its most impotent and bewildering when cultivating a philosophically insular character (e.g., selecting interpretative, ontological, or conceptual models solely for fit with pre-fixed art theoretic commitments). For example, when (...)
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  48. Art & Art-Attempts.Christy Mag Uidhir - 2013 - Oxford University Press.
    Although few philosophers agree about what it is for something to be art, most, if not all, agree on one thing: art must be in some sense intention dependent. Art and Art-Attempts is about what follows from taking intention dependence seriously as a substantive necessary condition for something's being art. Christy Mag Uidhir argues that from the assumption that art must be the product of intentional action, along with basic action-theoretic account of attempts (goal-oriented intention-directed activity), follows a host of (...)
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  49. The Philosophy of Tragedy: From Plato to Žižek.Julian Young - 2013 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book is a full survey of the philosophy of tragedy from antiquity to the present. From Aristotle to Žižek the focal question has been: why, in spite of its distressing content, do we value tragic drama? What is the nature of the 'tragic effect'? Some philosophers point to a certain kind of pleasure that results from tragedy. Others, while not excluding pleasure, emphasize the knowledge we gain from tragedy - of psychology, ethics, freedom or immortality. Through a critical engagement (...)
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  50. A Philosophy of the Screenplay.Ted Nannicelli - 2012 - Routledge.
    Recently, scholars in a variety of disciplines—including philosophy, film and media studies, and literary studies—have become interested in the aesthetics, definition, and ontology of the screenplay. To this end, this volume addresses the fundamental philosophical questions about the nature of the screenplay: What is a screenplay? Is the screenplay art—more specifically, literature? What kind of a thing is a screenplay? Nannicelli argues that the screenplay is a kind of artefact; as such, its boundaries are determined collectively by screenwriters, and its (...)
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