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  1. “Just a Little Respect”: Effects of a Layoff Agent’s Actions on Employees’ Reactions to a Dismissal Notification Meeting.Manuela Richter, Cornelius J. König, Marlene Geiger, Svenja Schieren, Jan Lothschütz & Yannik Zobel - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 153 (3):741-761.
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  2. The Impact of Financial Incentives and Perceptions of Seriousness on Whistleblowing Intention.Paul Andon, Clinton Free, Radzi Jidin, Gary S. Monroe & Michael J. Turner - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 151 (1):165-178.
    Many jurisdictions have put regulatory strategies in place to provide incentives and safeguards to whistleblowers to encourage whistleblowing on corporate wrongdoings. One such strategy is the provision of a financial incentive to the whistleblower if the complaint leads to a successful regulatory enforcement action against the offending organization. We conducted an experiment using professional accountants as participants to examine whether such an incentive encourages potential whistleblowers to report an observed financial reporting fraud to a relevant external authority. We also examine (...)
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  3. Of Brahmins and Dalits in the Academic Caste System.Leemon McHenry & Paul W. Sharkey - 2014 - Academe 2014 (Jan-feb):35-38.
    Traditionally, the three-pronged mission of our colleges and universities has been to provide high-quality education, encourage cutting-edge research, and promote professional and community service. The substitution of business-based policies for sound academic principles, however, has institutionalized a form of professional inequality that threatens all three. The growing distinction between tenured and tenure-track faculty members on the one hand and tenure-ineligible lecturers or part-time adjuncts on the other has produced an academic caste system that is undermining the raison d’être of our (...)
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  4. Ethical Codes in Sports Organizations: Classification Framework, Content Analysis, and the Influence of Content on Code Effectiveness.Els De Waegeneer, Jeroen Van De Sompele & Annick Willem - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 136 (3):587-598.
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  5. Linking Altruism and Organizational Learning Capability: A Study From Excellent Human Resources Management Organizations in Spain.Jacob Guinot, Ricardo Chiva & Fermín Mallén - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 138 (2):349-364.
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  6. Is the Ethical Culture of the Organization Associated with Sickness Absence? A Multilevel Analysis in a Public Sector Organization.Maiju Kangas, Joona Muotka, Mari Huhtala, Anne Mäkikangas & Taru Feldt - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 140 (1):131-145.
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  7. A Dual-Processing Model of Moral Whistleblowing in Organizations.Logan L. Watts & M. Ronald Buckley - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 146 (3):669-683.
    A dual-processing model of moral whistleblowing in organizations is proposed. In this theory paper, moral whistleblowing is described as a unique type of whistleblowing that is undertaken by individuals that see themselves as moral agents and are primarily motivated to blow the whistle by a sense of moral duty. At the individual level, the model expands on traditional, rational models of whistleblowing by exploring how moral intuition and deliberative reasoning processes might interact to influence the whistleblowing behavior of moral agents. (...)
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  8. Can Corporations Have Responsibility Regarding Climate Change Mitigation?Säde Hormio - 2017 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 20 (3):314-332.
    Does it make sense to talk about corporate responsibility for climate change mitigation? Through utilizing systems thinking, I will argue that mitigation should be incorporated into corporate policies for present and future activities within the existing political framework. However, not much retrospective responsibility exists for past emissions. Exception to this are corporations who have engaged in climate change lobbying activities, voluntarily expanding their sphere of influence in the system. They could be responsible for the damage caused by misinformation campaigns and (...)
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  9. The Factors Influencing Corporate Social Responsibility Disclosure in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.Ayman Issa - 2017 - Australian Journal of Basic and Applied Sciences 11 (10):1-19.
    BACKGROUND: In today’s world of increased awareness regarding the concepts of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and corporate governance (CG), many firms in the developed countries consider noncompliance with CSR and CG standards as an important source of risk to their reputations with stakeholders. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between the corporate social responsibility disclosure (CSRD) index and corporate factors, namely, board size, board independence, board meetings, CEO duality, a firm’s size, leverage, profitability and age. (...)
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  10. The Stigma of Reporting Wrongdoing at Work: When Doing Right is Perceived as Wrong.Maciej Macko & Brita Bjørkelo - 2012 - Polish Psychological Bulletin 43 (2):70-75.
    The stigma of reporting wrongdoing at work: When doing right is perceived as wrong The act of reporting unethical, illegal and illegitimate practices at work, whistleblowing, can be associated with a stigma for the individual in question. This article presents the stigmatizing position of reporting wrongdoing at work, types of wrongdoing and individual antecedents. Since empirical studies have shown very few systematic results regarding individual differences, one way to decrease societal stigma can be to relate the act of reporting to (...)
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  11. Does Type of Wrongdoing Affect the Whistle-Blowing Process?Janet P. Near, Michael T. Rehg, James R. Van Scotter & Marcia P. Miceli - 2004 - Business Ethics Quarterly 14 (2):219-242.
    We analyzed data from a survey of employees of a large military base in order to assess possible differences in the whistle-blowingprocess due to type of wrongdoing observed. Employees who observed perceived wrongdoing involving mismanagement, sexual harassment, or unspecified legal violations were significantly more likely to report it than were employees who observed stealing, waste, safety problems, or discrimination. Further, type of wrongdoing was significantly related to reasons given by employees who observed wrongdoing but did not report it, across all (...)
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  12. Questioning Organizational Ethics Initiatives.Gary R. Weaver - 1994 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 5:1125-1130.
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  13. Corporate Response to Legislative Protection for Whistle-Blowers.Janet P. Near & Terry Morehead Dworkin - 1994 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 5:781-792.
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  14. Ethical Perspectives on Employee Involvement Programs.David Clowney - 1993 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 4:793-804.
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  15. Blowing the Whistle on Minor, Less Serious Forms of Fraud.John P. Keenan - 1995 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 6:167-178.
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  16. Codes of Ethics.Gary R. Weaver & Philip L. Cochran - 1993 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 4:549-559.
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  17. The Caring Organization.Judith White - 1994 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 5:171-180.
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  18. Antecedents of Ethical Work Climates.Deborah Vidaver Cohen - 1994 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 5:1-14.
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  19. Investigating Influences on Whistle-Blowing Intention in China: Empirical Evidences and Implications.Yoon-Jung Baek & Jiang Yao - 2013 - Journal of Ethics 1 (90):195-225.
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  20. Does Grass Bend with Wind Blowing Over? - A Reflection of the Role of Moral Model.Wang Jinyi - 2013 - Journal of Ethics 1 (89):65-74.
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  21. A Study on the Researcher's Whistle Blowing in Ethical Perspective. 김대군 - 2007 - Journal of Ethics 1 (66):27-49.
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  22. Kierkegaard’s Quest: How Not to Stop Seducing.Finn Janning - 2015 - Philosophy of Management 14 (2):95-109.
    Change has traditionally been perceived as something to be avoided in favor of stability. This can be witnessed in both individual and organizational approaches to change. In this paper, change as a process of becoming is analyzed. The author relates change to seduction to introduce new perspectives to the concept. The principal idea is that the process of change is a seductive experience. This assumption highlights the positive aspects of becoming, growing, and changing. In doing so, reference is made to (...)
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  23. Knowledge, Tracking, a Bell Here and a Whistle There: Response to Ramachandran.Yohan Joo & Simon Langford - 2016 - South African Journal of Philosophy 35 (1):9-17.
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  24. Furthering the Conversation Between Philosophy and Organization Theory.Stewart W. Herman - 1991 - Business Ethics Quarterly 1 (1):121-132.
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  25. Is Formal Ethics Training Merely Cosmetic? A Study of Ethics Training and Ethical Organizational Culture.Danielle E. Warren, Joseph P. Gaspar & William S. Laufer - 2014 - Business Ethics Quarterly 24 (1):85-117.
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  26. The Battle in Seattle: Reconciling Two World Views on Corporate Culture.John Dobson - 2001 - Business Ethics Quarterly 11 (3):403.
    This paper investigates the broad ideological conflict between world views on corporate culture. Two views are identified: one encompassing standard liberal economic philosophy; the other taking broader notions of corporate culture from ethics theory. Theconflict that surrounded the World Trade Organization meeting in Seattle is used as an illustration of the current conflict between theseviews. The writings of Alasdair MacIntyre are employed as a means of elucidating and reconciling these two world views.
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  27. Examining the Link Between Organizational Democracy and Employees’ Moral Development.Armin Pircher Verdorfer & Wolfgang G. Weber - 2016 - Journal of Moral Education 45 (1):59-73.
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  28. RU 486 in France and England: Corporate Ethics and Compulsory Licensing.Reed Boland - 1992 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 20 (3):226-234.
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  29. Authentic Leadership and Whistleblowing: Mediating Roles of Psychological Safety and Personal Identification.Sheng-min Liu, Jian-Qiao Liao & Hongguo Wei - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 131 (1):107-119.
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  30. Ethics Training in the Indian IT Sector: Formal, Informal or Both?Pratima Verma, Siddharth Mohapatra & Jan Löwstedt - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 133 (1):73-93.
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  31. The Effectiveness of Ethics Programs: The Role of Scope, Composition, and Sequence.Muel Kaptein - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 132 (2):415-431.
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  32. Erratum To: Whistle-Blowing Methods for Navigating Within and Helping Reform Regulatory Institutions.Richard P. Nielsen, Lakshmi Balachandra & Anna L. Nielsen - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 112 (3):549-549.
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  33. Together and Apart: Exploring Structure of the Corporate–NPO Relationship.Dayna Simpson, Kathryn Lefroy & Yelena Tsarenko - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 101 (2):297-311.
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  34. The Impact of Cultural Differences on the Convergence of International Accounting Codes of Ethics.Curtis E. Clements, John D. Neill & O. Scott Stovall - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 90 (S3):383-391.
    The International Federation of Accountants (IFAC) has issued a revised “Code of Ethics for Professional Accountants” (IFAC Code). The IFAC Code is intended to be a model code of ethics for national accounting organizations throughout the world. Prior research demonstrates that approximately 50% of IFAC member organizations have adopted the IFAC Code as their organizational code of conduct. There is therefore empirical evidence that international convergence of accounting ethical standards is occurring. We employ Hofstede’s ( 2008 , http://www.geert-hofstede.com/hofstede_dimensions.php ) cultural (...)
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  35. “Ethics Hotlines” in Transnational Companies: A Comparative Study.Reyes Calderón-Cuadrado, José Luis Álvarez-Arce, Isabel Rodríguez-Tejedo & Stella Salvatierra - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 88 (1):199-210.
    This empirical study explores the characteristics and degree of implementation of so-called ethics hotlines in transnational companies (TNCs), which allow employees to present allegations of wrongdoing and ethical dilemmas, as well as to report concerns. Ethics hotlines have not received much attention in literature; therefore, this paper aims to fill that gap. Through the analysis of conduct/ethics codes and the compliance programs of the top 150 transnational companies ranked by the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) ( 2007 (...)
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  36. Organizational Moral Learning: What, If Anything, Do Corporations Learn From NGO Critique?Heiko Spitzeck - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 88 (1):157-173.
    While organizational learning literature has generated significant insight into the effective and efficient achievement of organizational goals as well as to the modus of learning, it is currently unable to describe moral learning processes in organizations consistently. Corporations need to learn morally if they want to deal effectively with stakeholders criticizing their conduct. Nongovernmental organizations do not ask corporations to be more effective or efficient in what they do, but to become more responsible or to learn morally. Current research on (...)
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  37. A New Generation of Corporate Codes of Ethics.Cynthia Stohl, Michael Stohl & Lucy Popova - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 90 (4):607-622.
    Globalization theories posit organizational convergence, suggesting that Codes of Ethics will become commonplace and include greater consideration of global issues. This study explores the degree to which the Codes of Ethics of 157 corporations on the Global 500 and/or Fortune 500 lists include the "third generation" of corporate social responsibility. Unlike first generation ethics, which focus on the legal context of corporate behavior, and second generation ethics, which locate responsibility to groups directly associated with the corporation, third generation ethics transcend (...)
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  38. Codes, Ethics and Cross-Cultural Differences: Stories From the Implementation of a Corporate Code of Ethics in a MNC Subsidiary.Sven Helin & Johan Sandström - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (2):281-291.
    In this article, we focus on the cross-cultural aspects of the implementation of an American company's code of ethics into its Swedish subsidiary. We identify the cross-cultural stories that the receivers in the subsidiary use when trying to explain the parent's code and conceptualize these stories as part of an emerging narrative of national belonging and differences. The receivers resisted the code by amplifying the importance of national identity. Rather than stimulating a discussion on ethics that might have strengthened the (...)
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  39. Ten Years of Public Interest Disclosure Legislation in the UK: Are Whistleblowers Adequately Protected?David Lewis - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (2):497-507.
    Purpose The purpose of this article is to assess the operation of the UK’s Public Interest Disclosure Act 1998 (PIDA 1998) during its first 10 years and to consider its implications for the whistleblowing process. Method The article sets the legislation into context by discussing the common law background. It then gives detailed consideration to the statutory provisions and how they have been interpreted by the courts and tribunals. Results In assessing the impact of the legislation’s approach to whistleblowing both (...)
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  40. A Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing: The Use of Ethics-Related Terms in 10-K Reports.Tim Loughran, Bill McDonald & Hayong Yun - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 89 (S1):39-49.
    We examine the occurrence of ethicsrelated terms in 10-K annual reports over 1994-2006 and offer empirical observations on the conceptual framework of Erhard et al. 2007). We use a pre-Sarbanes-Oxley sample subset to compare the occurrence of ethics-related terms in our 10-K data with samples from other studies that consider virtue-related phenomena. We find that firms using ethics-related terms are more likely to be "sin" stocks, are more likely to be the object of class action lawsuits, and are more likely (...)
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  41. Approaches to Ethics for Corporate Crisis Management.Per Sandin - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 87 (1):109-116.
    The ethics of corporate crisis management is a seriously underdeveloped field. Among recent proposals in the area, two contributions stand out: Seeger and Ulmer’s (2001) virtue ethics approach to crisis management ethics and Simola’s (2003) ethics of care. In the first part of the paper, I argue that both contributions are problematic: Seeger and Ulmer focus on top management and propose virtues that lack substance and are in need of further development. Simola’s proposal is also fraught with difficulty, since it (...)
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  42. An Examination of the Association Between Gender and Reporting Intentions for Fraudulent Financial Reporting.Steven Kaplan, Kurt Pany, Janet Samuels & Jian Zhang - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 87 (1):15-30.
    We report the results of a study that examines the association between gender and individuals’ intentions to report fraudulent financial reporting using non-anonymous and anonymous reporting channels. In our experimental study, we examine whether reporting intentions in response to discovering a fraudulent financial reporting act are associated with the participants’ gender, the perpetrator’s gender, and/or the interaction between the participants’ and perpetrator’s gender. We find that female participants’ reporting intentions for an anonymous channel are higher than for male participants; the (...)
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  43. The Codes of Ethics of S&P/MIB Italian Companies: An Investigation of Their Contents and the Main Factors That Influence Their Adoption.Ennio Lugli, Ulpiana Kocollari & Chiara Nigrisoli - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 84 (S1):33-45.
    This article introduces and discusses the initial results of a survey focused on the contents, role and effectiveness of company codes of ethics. The article examines the contents of the codes of ethics of companies operating in the private sector in Italy, quoted on the Italian Stock Exchange (Standard& Poor/Mib-Milano Indice Borsa). The purpose of this investigation was to identify any correlations between sector characteristics and the contents of the codes of ethics, which would enable us to map out the (...)
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  44. The Morality of Everyday Activities: Not the Right, But the Good Thing To Do.Daniel Nyberg - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 81 (3):587-598.
    This article attempts to understand and develop the morality of everyday activities in organizations. Aristotle’s concept of phronesis, practical wisdom, is utilized to describe the morality of the everyday work activities at two call centres of an Australian insurance company. The ethnographic data suggests that ethical judgements at the lower level of the organization are practical rather than theoretical; emergent rather than static; ambiguous rather than clear-cut; and particular rather than universal. Ethical codes are of limited value here and it (...)
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  45. Guide to the Ethics of Ex Parte Communications.Patricia Sue Wall - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 81 (3):555-559.
    Ex parte communications can become an administrative quagmire for anyone trying to deal with tribunals that regulate business matters. These communications involve contact between a decision maker and one party outside the presence of another, interested party. At a time when codes of ethics are enacted to make corporate financial officers and boards of directors more accountable to their stockholders, and thus, to restore the confidence of the investing public, it appears most important that administrative judges and hearing officers adhere (...)
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  46. The Role of Ethics Institutionalization in Influencing Organizational Commitment, Job Satisfaction, and Esprit de Corps.Scott John Vitell & Anusorn Singhapakdi - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 81 (2):343-353.
    Given increasing ethical problems in business, many organizations have tried to control these problems by institutionalizing ethics such as by creating new ethics positions and formulating and enforcing codes of ethics. In this study, the impact of implicit and explicit forms of institutionalization of ethics on job satisfaction, esprit de corps, and organizational commitment for marketing professionals is investigated. Additionally, the influence of organizational socialization, ethical relativism, and age relative to each of the above organizational climate constructs is examined. Results (...)
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  47. Organization-Harm Vs. Organization-Gain Ethical Issues: An Exploratory Examination of the Effects of Organizational Commitment.C. Cullinan, Dennis Bline, Robert Farrar & Dana Lowe - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 80 (2):225-235.
    The existing literature on the relationship between organizational commitment and ethical decision making suggests that ethical decision makers with higher organizational commitment are less likely to engage in ethically questionable behaviors. The ethical behaviors previously studied in an organizational commitment context have been organization-harm issues in which the organization was harmed and the individual benefited (e.g., overstating an expense report). There is another class of ethical issues in an organizational context, however. These other issues, termed organization-gain issues, focus on the (...)
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  48. Whistle-Blowing for Profit: An Ethical Analysis of the Federal False Claims Act.Thomas L. Carson, Mary Ellen Verdu & Richard E. Wokutch - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 77 (3):361-376.
    This paper focuses on the 1986 Amendments to the False Claims Act of 1863, which offers whistle-blowers financial rewards for disclosing fraud committed against the U.S. government. This law provides an opportunity to examine underlying assumptions about the morality of whistle-blowing and to consider the merits of increased reliance on whistle-blowing to protect the public interest. The law seems open to a number of moral objections, most notably that it exerts a morally corrupting influence on whistle-blowers. We answer these objections (...)
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  49. Observers’ Impressions of Unethical Persons and Whistleblowers.Wayne H. Decker & Thomas J. Calo - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 76 (3):309-318.
    Since there have been many recent occurrences of alleged wrongdoing by business persons and other professionals, it seems additional ethics research is needed to obtain knowledge that will impact real-world behavior. An empirical study assessed business students' impressions of hypothetical wrongdoers and whistleblowers. To some extent, impressions of an unethical executive and a whistleblower were influenced by the same variables and in opposite directions. Female respondents judged the unethical executive less favorably and the whistleblower more favorably than did males. The (...)
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  50. Intentions to Report Questionable Acts: An Examination of the Influence of Anonymous Reporting Channel, Internal Audit Quality, and Setting.Steven E. Kaplan & Joseph J. Schultz - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 71 (2):109-124.
    The Sarbanes–Oxley Act of 2002 requires audit committees of public companies’ boards of directors to install an anonymous reporting channel to assist in deterring and detecting accounting fraud and control weaknesses. While it is generally accepted that the availability of such a reporting channel may reduce the reporting cost of the observer of a questionable act, there is concern that the addition of such a channel may decrease the overall effectiveness compared to a system employing only non-anonymous reporting options. The (...)
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