This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories

704 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 704
Material to categorize
  1. The Methods Used to Implement an Ethical Code of Conduct and Employee Attitudes.Avshalom M. Adam & Dalia Rachman-Moore - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 54 (3):223-242.
    In the process of implementing an ethical code of conduct, a business organization uses formal methods. Of these, training, courses and means of enforcement are common and are also suitable for self-regulation. The USA is encouraging business corporations to self regulate with the Federal Sentencing Guidelines (FSG). The Guidelines prescribe similar formal methods and specify that, unless such methods are used, the process of implementation will be considered ineffective, and the business will therefore not be considered to have complied with (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  2. Codes of Ethics as Signals for Ethical Behavior.Janet S. Adams, Armen Tashchian & Ted H. Shore - 2001 - Journal of Business Ethics 29 (3):199 - 211.
    This study investigated effects of codes of ethics on perceptions of ethical behavior. Respondents from companies with codes of ethics (n = 465) rated role set members (top management, supervisors, peers, subordinates, self) as more ethical and felt more encouraged and supported for ethical behavior than respondents from companies without codes (n = 301). Key aspects of the organizational climate, such as supportiveness for ethical behavior, freedom to act ethically, and satisfaction with the outcome of ethical problems were impacted by (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   99 citations  
  3. Whistle-Blower Narratives: The Experience of Choiceless Choice.C. Fred Alford - 2007 - Social Research: An International Quarterly 74 (1):223-248.
    Most whistleblowers talk as if they never had a choice about whether to blow the whistle. This doesn't mean they acted suddenly, or impulsively, only that they believe they could not have done otherwise. Trying to make sense of this near universal answer to the question "Why did you do it?" the essay draws on narrative theory. Narrative theory distinguishes between actant and sender—that is, between actor and his or her values. This distinction helps to explain what it means to (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  4. The Impact of Financial Incentives and Perceptions of Seriousness on Whistleblowing Intention.Paul Andon, Clinton Free, Radzi Jidin, Gary S. Monroe & Michael J. Turner - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Reconceptualising Whistleblowing in a Complex World.Julio A. Andrade - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 128 (2):321-335.
    This paper explores the ethical dilemma of conflicting loyalties found in whistleblowing. Central to this dilemma is the internal/external disclosure dichotomy; disclosure of organisational wrongdoing to an external recipient is seen as disloyal, whilst disclosure to an internal recipient is seen as loyal. Understanding how the organisation and society have dealt with these problems over the last 30 years is undertaken through an analysis of Vandekerckhove’s project, which seeks to place the normative legitimisations of whistleblowing legislation and organisational whistleblowing policies (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Blowing Up the Power Set of the Least Measurable.Arthur W. Apter & James Cummings - 2002 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 67 (3):915-923.
    We prove some results related to the problem of blowing up the power set of the least measurable cardinal. Our forcing results improve those of [1] by using the optimal hypothesis.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. A Quasi-Personal Alternative to Some Anglo-American Pluralist Models of Organisations.David Ardagh - 2011 - Philosophy of Management 10 (3):41-58.
    An organisation which operates without a ‘self-concept’ of its goals, authorised roles, governance procedures regarding sharing information, decisional powers and procedures, and distribution of benefits, or without continuous audit of its impact on its end-users, other players in the practice, and the state, does so at some ethical risk.This paper argues that a quasi-personal model of the collective ethical agency of organisations and states is helpful in suggesting some of these key areas which are liable to need careful organisational design (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. External Ethics Statements: Research Recommendations and the Drip Effect.Katherine Armstrong & Gabriella Manina - 1995 - Business Ethics 4 (1):52–59.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. From Organization to Organization: On Creating Value. [REVIEW]James E. Austin - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 94 (1):13 - 15.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  10. Education and Corporate Success.Michael Awender - 1985 - Business and Society 24 (1):26-31.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Wrongdoing by Consultants: An Examination of Employees? Reporting Intentions.Ayers Susan & E. Kaplan Steven - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 57 (2):121-137.
    Organizations are increasingly embedded with consultants and other non-employees who have the opportunity to engage in wrongdoing. However, research exploring the reporting intentions of employees regarding the discovery of wrongdoing by consultants is scant. It is important to examine reporting intentions in this setting given the enhanced presence of consultants in organizations and the fact that wrongdoing by consultants changes a key characteristic of the wrongdoing. Using an experimental approach, the current paper reports the results of a study examining employees' (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  12. Wrongdoing by Consultants: An Examination of Employees' Reporting Intentions. [REVIEW]Susan Ayers & Steven E. Kaplan - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 57 (2):121 - 137.
    Organizations are increasingly embedded with consultants and other non-employees who have the opportunity to engage in wrongdoing. However, research exploring the reporting intentions of employees regarding the discovery of wrongdoing by consultants is scant. It is important to examine reporting intentions in this setting given the enhanced presence of consultants in organizations and the fact that wrongdoing by consultants changes a key characteristic of the wrongdoing. Using an experimental approach, the current paper reports the results of a study examining employees (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   13 citations  
  13. Investigating Influences on Whistle-Blowing Intention in China: Empirical Evidences and Implications.Yoon-Jung Baek & Jiang Yao - 2013 - Journal of Ethics 1 (90):195-225.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. Organic Codes.Marcello Barbieri - 2002 - Sign Systems Studies 30 (2):743-753.
    Coding characteristics have been discovered not only in protein synthesis, but also in various other natural processes, thus showing that the genetic code is not an isolated case in the organic world. Other examples are the sequence codes, the adhesion code, the signal transduction codes, the splicing codes, the sugar code, the histone code, and probably more. These discoveries however have not had a significant impact because of the widespread belief that organic codes are not real but metaphorical entities. They (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  15. An Evaluation of The Ethics Program at General Dynamics.Richard A. Barker - 1993 - Journal of Business Ethics 12 (3):165-177.
    The Ethics Program at General Dynamics was evaluated relative to its stated objectives and its implied objectives. The program was found to have met its specific objectives which require employees to follow rules and standards of conduct. The program did not apparently meet its implied objectives which would have created a more humanistic work environment for employees. This result apparently stemmed from program planners' intentions to use the hope for better working conditions as a motivation for employees to follow company (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. Religiosity, Ethical Ideology, and Intentions to Report a Peer's Wrongdoing.Tim Barnett, Ken Bass & Gene Brown - 1996 - Journal of Business Ethics 15 (11):1161 - 1174.
    Peer reporting is a specific form of whistelblowing in which an individual discloses the wrongdoing of a peer. Previous studies have examined situational variables thought to influence a person's decision to report the wrongdoing of a peer. The present study looked at peer reporting from the individual level. Five hypotheses were developed concerning the relationships between (1) religiosity and ethical ideology, (2) ethical ideology and ethical judgments about peer reporting, and (3) ethical judgments and intentions to report peer wrongdoing.Subjects read (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   62 citations  
  17. Genre et codes vestimentaires à Rome.Catherine Baroin - 2012 - Clio 36 (36):43-66.
    Si les textes juridiques et les usages de la Rome républicaine et impériale établissent un classement entre les vêtements selon le statut, le sexe et l’âge, certains vêtements apparaissent comme unisexes et, surtout, ce sont la façon de les porter, les gestes et la démarche qui leur donnent les connotations masculines ou féminines. Le sens du vêtement est construit par un système d’oppositions qui ne fonctionnent qu’en contexte. Ainsi, le vêtement peut caractériser à la fois un statut, un rang et (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. Barbieri’s Organic Codes Enable Error Correction of Genomes.Gérard Battail - 2014 - Biosemiotics 7 (2):259-277.
    Barbieri introduced and developed the concept of organic codes. The most basic of them is the genetic code, a set of correspondence rules between otherwise unrelated sequences: strings of nucleotides on the one hand, polypeptidic chains on the other hand. Barbieri noticed that it implies ‘coding by convention’ as arbitrary as the semantic relations a language establishes between words and outer objects. Moreover, the major transitions in life evolution originated in new organic codes similarly involving conventional rules. Independently, dealing with (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. Designing Ethical Organizations: Avoiding the Long-Term Negative Effects of Rewards and Punishments.Melissa S. Baucus & Caryn L. Beck-Dudley - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 56 (4):355-370.
    Ethics researchers advise managers of organizations to link rewards and punishments to ethical and unethical behavior, respectively. We build on prior research maintaining that organizations operate at Kohlbergs stages of moral reasoning, and explain how the over-reliance on rewards and punishments encourages employees to operate at Kohlbergs lowest stages of moral reasoning. We advocate designing organizations as ethical communities and relying on different assumptions about employees in order to foster ethical reasoning at higher levels. Characteristics associated with ethical communities are (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  20. Employee 'Salons'.Terry Beard - 1994 - Business Ethics 8 (4):32-32.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. The Canadian Defense Ethics Program and the “Corporate Model”.Denis Beauchamp - 1998 - Business and Society Review 100 (1):71-74.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. Adequacy of International Codes of Behavior.Jack N. Behrman - 2001 - Journal of Business Ethics 31 (1):51 - 64.
    International codes of corporate behavior have been proposed, discussed, negotiated, and promulgated by governments, transnational corporations, and inter-corporate associations over the past few decades. It is not clear that they have been resoundingly as successful in changing corporate behavior – particularly as to corruption and environmental protection – as have national government requirements imposed on foreign enterprises and their own officials. This article arrays the many attempts to structure cooperative action to re-order corporate behavior on several dimensions – restrictive business (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  23. Sundstrand: A Case Study in Transformation of Cultural Ethics. [REVIEW]James A. Benson & David L. Ross - 1998 - Journal of Business Ethics 17 (14):1517 - 1527.
    This analysis examines whistleblowing within the context of organizational culture. Several factors which have provided impetus for organizations to emphasize ethical conduct and to encourage internal, rather than external, whistleblowing are identified. Inadequate protection for whistleblowers and statutory enticement for them to report ethical violations externally are discussed. Sundstrand's successful model for cultural change and encouragement of internal whistleblowing is analyzed to show how their model of demonstrating management's commitment to ethical conduct, establishing ethical expectations of employees, training to ensure (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  24. Power to the Employee.Deborah Bihler - 1991 - Business Ethics 5 (3):13-14.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. Substantive Ethics: Integrating Law and Ethics in Corporate Ethics Programs. [REVIEW]Mark S. Blodgett - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 99 (S1):39-48.
    Continual corporate malfeasance signals the need for obeying the law and for enhancing business ethics perspectives. Yet, the relationship between law and ethics and its integrative role in defining values are often unclear. While integrity-based ethics programs emphasize ethics values more than law or compliance, viewing ethics as being integrated with law may enhance understanding of an organization’s core values. The author refers to this integration of law and ethics as “substantive ethics,” analogous to the substantive law that evolves over (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  26. An Examination Into the Disclosure, Structure, and Contents of Ethical Codes in Publicly Listed Acquiring Firms.Virginia Bodolica & Martin Spraggon - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 126 (3):1-14.
    Due to the prevalent influence of legal trends in driving ethical homogenization and persistent decoupling between ethical substance and symbolism in today’s organizations, scholars are calling for a renewed interest in the structural makeup of ethical codes. This article explores the disclosure trends and examines the contents of codes of ethics in the context of Canadian publicly listed acquirers. Relying on the analysis of codes’ public availability, structure, purpose, and promoted values, four clusters of behavior are identified. Although many firms (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. Applications to the Industrial Sector.Roger M. Boisjoly - 1998 - Science and Engineering Ethics 4 (1):71-74.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  28. RU 486 in France and England: Corporate Ethics and Compulsory Licensing.Reed Boland - 1992 - Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 20 (3):226-234.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. RU 486 in France and England: Corporate Ethics and Compulsory Licensing.Reed Boland - 1992 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 20 (3):226-234.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. Corporate Communication, Ethics, and Operational Identity: A Case Study of Benetton.Janet L. Borgerson, Jonathan E. Schroeder, Martin Escudero Magnusson & Frank Magnusson - 2009 - Business Ethics: A European Review 18 (3):209-223.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  31. Intelligence and the Limits of Codes.Albert Borgmann - 2011 - In Thomas Bartscherer (ed.), Switching Codes. Chicago University Press. pp. 184.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32. Au Nom de la Norme: Les Dispositifs de Gestion Entre Normes Organisationnelles Et Normes Professionnelles.Valérie Boussard (ed.) - 2005 - Harmattan.
    Et derrière cette dernière se dessine le rôle des managers, premiers acteurs de ces dynamiques de changement, pour avoir intériorisé les principes de la rationalisation. Premiers acteurs ? Seuls acteurs ?
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. STOPPING CORPORATE WRONGS.Peter Bowden - 2010 - Australian Journal Professional and Applied Ethics 12 (1&2):55-69.
    The corporate meltdowns of this and the previous decade in the US - WorldCom, Enron, Tyco, and in Australia - FAI, HIH and AWB being among the many examples - have resulted in the governments of those two countries introducing legislation and policy guidelines aimed at minimising future corporate misbehaviour. -/- The US has introduced the Sarbanes Oxley Act, with requirements on corporate accountants and auditors, as well as its whistleblowing provisions. It has revised the Federal Sentencing Guidelines for Organizations. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. An Analysis of Whistleblower Protections.Peter Bowden - 2006 - Australian Journal of Professional and Applied Ethics 8 (2).
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. The Effectiveness of Corporate Communicative Responses to Accusations of Unethical Behavior.Jeffrey L. Bradford & Dennis E. Garrett - 1995 - Journal of Business Ethics 14 (11):875 - 892.
    When corporations are accused of unethical behaviour by external actors, executives from those organizations are usually compelled to offer communicative responses to defend their corporate image. To demonstrate the effect that corporate executives'' communicative responses have on third parties'' perception of corporate image, we present the Corporate Communicative Response Model in this paper. Of the five potential communicative responses contained in this model (no response, denial, excuse, justification, and concession), results from our empirical test demonstrate that a concession is the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  36. Influences on Corporate Ethics Programs.S. N. Brenner - 1990 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 1:106-117.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  37. A Content Analysis of Codes of Ethics From Fifty‐Seven National Accounting Organisations.Deirdre Cobbin Brian Farrell - 2000 - Business Ethics 9 (3):180-190.
    The paper identifies in the literature two categories of codes of ethics, inspirational and prescriptive, and introduces new classification categories of allodial and decretal. The first classification is based on the identity of the ethics decision‐maker – the authors or the addressees of codes. The second classification is based on whether operational definitions are applied by the codes. Such concrete definitions may be in the rules themselves, in related documents or be known from shared knowledge. The second classification has importance (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. What's Wrong with the Treadway Commission Report? Experimental Analyses of the Effects of Personal Values and Codes of Conduct on Fraudulent Financial Reporting.Arthur P. Brief, Janet M. Dukerich, Paul R. Brown & Joan F. Brett - 1996 - Journal of Business Ethics 15 (2):183 - 198.
    In three studies, factors influencing the incidence of fraudulent financial reporting were assessed. We examined (1) the effects of personal values and (2) codes of corporate conduct, on whether managers misrepresented financial reports. In these studies, executives and controllers were asked to respond to hypothetical situations involving fraudulent financial reporting procedures. The occurrence of fraudulent reporting was found to be high; however, neither personal values, codes of conduct, nor the interaction of the two factors played a significant role in fraudulent (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   27 citations  
  39. Putting Meta-Analysis to Work: Accountants' Organizational-Professional Conflict. [REVIEW]John A. Brierley & Christopher J. Cowton - 2000 - Journal of Business Ethics 24 (4):343 - 353.
    Commentators on empirical research in business ethics have recommended that use should be made of meta-analysis – the quantitative analysis of a group of research studies. This paper elaborates upon those recommendations by conducting, as a "case study" for further reflection, a meta-analysis of studies of accountants' organizational-professional conflict (OPC) previously published in accounting and psychology journals. Of five variables capable of analysis, only the population correlation coefficient between OPC and organizational tenure is identified. It was not possible to find (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  40. Book Review:Codes of Ethics: A Handbook. Edgar L. Heermance. [REVIEW]A. P. Brogan - 1925 - Ethics 36 (1):102-.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41. Corporate Ethical Performance: Trends, Forecasts and Outlooks. [REVIEW]L. J. Brooks - 1989 - Journal of Business Ethics 8 (1):31 - 38.
    Executives, professionals, educators and labour leaders are requesting an update on corporate ethical trends. This article presents an examination of why the interest in corporate ethics is growing both in society and in corporations. An analysis follows of how corporations are responding to this interest, and of how that response might be enhanced through improved second-generation codes of ethical performance.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  42. Corporate Codes of Ethics.Leonard J. Brooks - 1989 - Journal of Business Ethics 8 (2-3):117 - 129.
    The majority of North American corporations awakened to the need for their own ethical guidelines during the late 1970s and early 1980s, even though modern corporations are subject to a surprising multiplicity of external codes of ethics or conduct. This paper provides an understanding of both internal and external codes through a discussion of the factors behind the development of the codes, an analysis of internal codes and an identification of problems with them.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   25 citations  
  43. On Sprague's “the Voice of Experience”.Taft H. Broome - 1998 - Science and Engineering Ethics 4 (1):45-50.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44. Normal Injustices and Morality in Complex Organizations.J. Stuart Bunderson - 2001 - Journal of Business Ethics 33 (3):181 - 190.
    This paper applies theory and research examining errors in complex organizational systems to the problem of individual and collective morality in organizations. It is proposed that because of the nature of complex organizations, unjust outcomes can (and will) result from organizational actions even when all organization members have acted responsibly. The argument that complex organizations are therefore immoral is considered and rejected. Instead, the paper argues that morality in complex organizations begins with "heedful interrelating" among individual organization members. The paper (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45. The Influence of Collegiate and Corporate Codes of Conduct on Ethics-Related Behavior in the Workplace.Kenneth D. Butterfield - 1996 - Business Ethics Quarterly 6 (4):461-476.
    Codes of conduct are viewed here as a community’s attempt to communicate its expectations and standards of ethical behavior. Many organizations are implementing codes, but empirical support for the relationship between such codes and employee conduct is lacking. We investigated the long term effects of a collegiate honor code experience as well as the effects of corporate ethics codes on unethical behavior in the workplace by surveying alumni from an honor code and a non-honor code college who now work in (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  46. “Ethics Hotlines” in Transnational Companies: A Comparative Study.Reyes Calderón-Cuadrado, José Luis Álvarez-Arce, Isabel Rodríguez-Tejedo & Stella Salvatierra - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 88 (1):199-210.
    This empirical study explores the characteristics and degree of implementation of so-called ethics hotlines in transnational companies (TNCs), which allow employees to present allegations of wrongdoing and ethical dilemmas, as well as to report concerns. Ethics hotlines have not received much attention in literature; therefore, this paper aims to fill that gap. Through the analysis of conduct/ethics codes and the compliance programs of the top 150 transnational companies ranked by the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) ( 2007 (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47. Duties Owed to Organizational Citizens – Ethical Insights for Today's Leader. [REVIEW]Cam Caldwell - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 102 (3):343-356.
    Organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) has been widely recognized as a contributor to improving organizational performance and wealth creation. The purpose of this article is to briefly summarize the motives of many employees who exercise OCB and to identify the ethical duties owed by organizational leaders to the highly committed employees with whom they work. After reviewing the nature of OCB and the psychological contracts made with highly committed employees, we then use Hosmer’s framework of ten ethical perspectives to identify how (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  48. Ethical Duties of Organizational Citizens: Obligations Owed by Highly Committed Employees. [REVIEW]Cam Caldwell, Larry A. Floyd, Ryan Atkins & Russell Holzgrefe - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 110 (3):285-299.
    Individuals who demonstrate organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) contribute to their organization’s ability to create wealth, but they also owe their organizations a complex set of ethical duties. Although, the academic literature has begun to address the ethical duties owed by organizational leaders to organizational citizens, very little has been written about the duties owed by those who practice OCB to their organizations. In this article, we identify an array of ethical duties owed by those who engage in extra-role behavior and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  49. Predicting Ethical Values and Training Needs in Ethics.Victor J. Callan - 1992 - Journal of Business Ethics 11 (10):761 - 769.
    Two hundred and twenty-six state employees completed a structured questionnaire that investigated their ethical values and training needs. Top management were more likely to have attitudes against cronyism and giving advantage to others. Individuals higher in the organizational hierarchy, and female employees were more likely to believe that discriminatory practices were an ethical concern. In addition, employees with a larger number of clients outside of the organization were more supportive of the need to maintain strict confidentiality in business dealings. Employees'' (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   31 citations  
  50. The Content and Focus of the Codes of Ethics of the World's Largest Transnational Corporations.Emily F. Carasco & Jang B. Singh - 2003 - Business and Society Review 108 (1):71-94.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   62 citations  
1 — 50 / 704