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  1. Law Professors Read Habermas.Mitchell Aboulafia - 1999 - Denver University Law Review 76 (4):943-953.
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  2. In Defence of the Political Constitution.Tomkins Adam - 2002 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 22 (1):157-175.
    The political constitution, and indeed politics generally, are in need of both defending and praising. A principal objective of Martin Loughlin’s ongoing research project exploring the relationship of law to politics is to demonstrate why this is so. In Sword and Scales, Professor Loughlin has provided us with a preliminary, but nonetheless essential, statement on this theme. The structure of Loughlin’s argument in Sword and Scales will be considered in section two of this essay. Sections three and four will then (...)
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  3. 2008 Financial Crisis and Islamic Finance: An Unrealized Opportunity.Fahad Al-Zumai & Mohammed Al-Wasmi - 2016 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 29 (2):455-472.
    The Islamic finance industry is relatively new and vibrant. It is becoming a mainstream industry in the MENA. The industry is based on a number of Sharia’a maxims and in particular the prohibition of Riba. Islamic law scholars’ emphasis on the ethical dimension of this industry and how it can be seen as a solution to existing capitalism. The current financial crisis presented this industry with an unprecedented test and an opportunity to influence and merge into main stream finance. This (...)
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  4. Review: Deborah Hellman and Sophia Moreau, Eds., Philosophical Foundations of Discrimination Law. [REVIEW]Review by: Larry Alexander - 2015 - Ethics 125 (3):872-879,.
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  5. Shorter Article: Bill of Rights and Judicial Power - a Liberal's Quandary.J. Allan - 1996 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 16 (2):337-340.
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  6. Constitutional Rights and Judicial Review.T. R. S. Allan - 2018 - Jurisprudence 9 (1):138-145.
  7. Proceduralism, Judicial Review and the Refusal of Royal Assent.Yann Allard-Tremblay - 2013 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 33 (2):379-400.
    This article provides an exploration of the relationships between a procedural account of epistemic democracy, illegitimate laws and judicial review. I first explain how there can be illegitimate laws within a procedural account of democracy. I argue that even if democratic legitimacy is conceived procedurally, it does not imply that democracy could legitimately undermine itself or adopt grossly unjust laws. I then turn to the legitimacy of judicial review with regard to these illegitimate laws. I maintain that courts do not (...)
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  8. Jennifer Suchland: Economies of Violence: Transnational Feminism, Postsocialism, and the Politics of Sex Trafficking.Shulamit Almog - 2016 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 29 (4):843-845.
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  9. The Unequal Right to Age Equality: Towards a Dignified Lives Approach to Age Discrimination.Pnina Alon-Shenker - 2012 - Canadian Journal of Law and Jurisprudence 25 (2):243-282.
    This paper critically examines prevailing egalitarian theories . The paper proposes an alternative theoretical framework: the Dignified Lives Approach. This theoretical framework, which rests on deontological foundations, considers all human beings as of equal moral worth, and advocates treating each individual with equal concern and respect at any given time. The paper articulates five essential principles of equality founded in the notion of equal concern and respect: the principle of individual assessment, the principle of equal influence, the principle of sufficiency, (...)
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  10. Does the ADA Provide Protection Against Discrimination on the Basis of Genotype?Joseph S. Alper - 1995 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 23 (2):167-172.
  11. Discrimination Debated: A Review of Deborah Hellman and Sophia Moreau , Philosophical Foundations of Discrimination Law[REVIEW]Andrew Altman - 2015 - Jurisprudence 6 (1):156-168.
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  12. Religion, Taxes, and Sex Discrimination.Andrew Altman - 2005 - Legal Theory 11 (2):125-142.
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  13. Reinterpreting the Right to an Open Future: From Autonomy to Authenticity.Scott Altman - 2018 - Law and Philosophy 37 (4):415-436.
    This paper reinterprets a child’s right to an open future as justified by authenticity rather than autonomy. It argues that authenticity can be recognized as valuable by people whose conceptions of the good do not value autonomy. As a running example, the paper considers ultra-Orthodox Jews who lead separatist lives and who deny their sons secular education beyond an elementary school level. If their adult sons want to have careers and participate in life outside the religious enclave, they cannot easily (...)
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  14. Problems of Introduction of Flexibility Into Lithuanian Labour Law.Tomas Bagdanskis & Justinas Usonis - 2011 - Jurisprudencija: Mokslo darbu žurnalas 18 (2):595-612.
    The problems of introduction of flexible work arrangements into Lithuanian labour law are analysed in the paper. Since 1990-ies Lithuania started making huge changes in its economy moving from planned (Soviet) to modern market economy. Together with these changes the employment relationship started to change as well. But after 20 years of development we still see a lack of modern view towards flexible work arrangements in labour laws. The problems of introduction of flexibility into Lithuanian employment relationship are discussed with (...)
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  15. Droit de la robotique: Livre blanc.Alain Bensoussan & Renaud Champion - 2016 - SYMOP.
    Histoire et utilisation du robot Bien que la robotique soit un marché économique relativement jeune et en pleine croissance, la genèse des robots remonte à l’Antiquité. Le premier robot à être déployé sur des lignes d’assemblage est Unimate, utilisé dès 1961 par General Motors. La robotique, en se di usant dans tous les pans de notre économie, va impacter les business modèles de nombreuses industries comme l’automobile et l’aéronautique mais aussi la construction ou l’agriculture. Aujourd’hui les robots industriels et de (...)
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  16. La doctrine environnementaliste face à l'exigence de neutralité axiologique: de l'illusion à la réflexivité.Julien Bétaille - 2016 - Revue Juridique de L'Environnement:20-59.
    Confrontée à l’exigence de neutralité axiologique, comprise comme le rejet de tout jugement de valeur, la doctrine environnementaliste ne fait pas preuve d’une particulière originalité. Elle porte peu d’intérêt à cette exigence, son discours est inéluctablement affecté par les mêmes biais que ceux qui touchent les autres catégories de doctrine et elle y apporte aussi des réponses comparables. Elle met d’une part en place des processus d’objectivation dont la portée est limitée en raison de l’étroitesse de la communauté scientifique du (...)
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  17. Rousseau and Law.Thom Brooks - 2005
    Jean-Jacques Rousseau stands as one of the most influential figures in the history of philosophy. His masterpiece-The Social Contract-has had a profound effect on legal and political theorists ever since its appearance. Rousseau and Law presents for the first time in one collection the most important contemporary work exploring his many contributions to legal theory. These essays deal with a variety of issues, such as social contract theories, democratic rights, fundamental law, natural law and natural rights, affinities between Rousseau and (...)
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  18. Rights in the Law: The Importance of God's Free Choices in the Thought of Francis Turretin.James E. Bruce - 2013 - Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht.
  19. Man, Law, and Modern Forms of Life.Eugenio Bulygin, Jean-Louis Gardies, Ilkka Niiniluoto, International Association for Philosophy of Law and Social Philosophy & World Congress on Philosophy of Law and Social Philosophy - 1985
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  20. Critical Review: Douglas Husak, Overcriminalization. The Limits of the Criminal Law. [REVIEW]Alfonso Donoso - 2010 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 4 (1):99-104.
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  21. Less Evidence, Better Knowledge.Kenneth M. Ehrenberg - 2015 - McGill Law Journal 60 (2):173-214.
    In his 1827 work Rationale of Judicial Evidence, Jeremy Bentham famously argued against exclusionary rules such as hearsay, preferring a policy of “universal admissibility” unless the declarant is easily available. Bentham’s claim that all relevant evidence should be considered with appropriate instructions to fact finders has been particularly influential among judges, culminating in the “principled approach” to hearsay in Canada articulated in R. v. Khelawon. Furthermore, many scholars attack Bentham’s argument only for ignoring the realities of juror bias, admitting universal (...)
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  22. Procedural Justice and Information in Conflict-Resolving Institutions.Kenneth M. Ehrenberg - 2003 - Albany Law Review 67:167-209.
    Notions of procedural justice alone are sufficient to support evidentiary exclusions in a wide variety of legal and law-like institutions that focus on conflict resolution, including courts. Special attention is paid to the relevance and need for exclusion of parties’ own assessments of the value of their claims.
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  23. Statistical Evidence, Sensitivity, and the Legal Value of Knowledge.David Enoch, Levi Spectre & Talia Fisher - 2012 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 40 (3):197-224.
    The law views with suspicion statistical evidence, even evidence that is probabilistically on a par with direct, individual evidence that the law is in no way suspicious of. But it has proved remarkably hard to either justify this suspicion, or to debunk it. In this paper, we connect the discussion of statistical evidence to broader epistemological discussions of similar phenomena. We highlight Sensitivity – the requirement that a belief be counterfactually sensitive to the truth in a specific way – as (...)
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  24. Foucault and Law. [REVIEW]Verena Erlenbusch - 2011 - Foucault Studies:219-222.
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  25. Codice di Diritto Canonico latino e Diritto Internazionale.Bruno Esposito - 2008 - Lumen Veritatis 1:13-72.
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  26. Rights Correlativity.David Frydrych - forthcoming - In The Legacy of Wesley Hohfeld. Cambridge University Press.
    Rights Correlativity, forthcoming in THE LEGACY OF WESLEY HOHFELD: EDITED MAJOR WORKS, SELECT PERSONAL PAPERS, AND ORIGINAL COMMENTARIES Shyam Balganesh, Ted Sichelman & Henry Smith eds. (Cambridge University Press 2018). This chapter explicates and critically assesses RIGHTS CORRELATIVITY. Section II addresses three core issues. The first concerns the conceptual structure of the tethered positions: does correlativity mean that the positions’ features must be symmetrical? Are correlative rights and duties the “mirror images” of one another, or not? A second issue is (...)
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  27. The Theories of Rights Debate.David Frydrych - forthcoming - Jurisprudence:1-23.
    This is the first comprehensive explanation and survey of the Interest-Will theories of rights debate. It elucidates the traditional understanding of it as a dispute over how best to explain A RIGHT and clarifies the theories’ competing criteria for that concept. The rest of the article then shows why recent developments are either problematic or simply fail to actually advance the debate. First, it is erroneous, as some theorists have done, to frame the entire debate in terms of competing explanations (...)
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  28. Kramer’s Delimiting Test for Legal Rights.David Frydrych - 2017 - American Journal of Jurisprudence 62 (2):197-207.
    Professor Matthew Kramer offers a delimiting ‘criterion’ or test for his Interest Theory of legal claim-rights. The ‘Minimum Sufficiency’ test is thought necessary because the Interest Theory is charged with being over-inclusive: it purportedly counts certain agents and entities as legal right-holders even though the law itself does not recognize them as such. This paper nonetheless argues that Kramer’s test is inadequate and unnecessary. It proceeds as follows. Section II offers a brief explanation of the Interest and Will Theories of (...)
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  29. "Is the ‘Hate’ in Hate Speech the ‘Hate’ in Hate Crime? Waldron and Dworkin on Political Legitimacy," Jurisprudence (Forthcoming).Rebecca Ruth Gould - forthcoming - Jurisprudence.
    Among the most persuasive arguments against hate speech bans was made by Ronald Dworkin, who warned of the threat to political legitimacy posed by laws that deny those subject to them adequate opportunity for dissent. In his influential defence of hate speech bans, Jeremy Waldron addresses these objections. Dworkin’s concern with political legitimacy is misplaced, he argues, given the provision speech bans make for substituting permissible modes of expression for impermissible ones. I argue that this defence of speech bans misidentifies (...)
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  30. Daddy Dilemmas: Untangling the Puzzles of Paternity.Donald C. Hubin - 2003 - Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy 13 (29):29-80.
    Though most children can easily answer the question, "Who's your daddy?", the concept of paternity is complex and multifaceted. Courts have stumbled in answering it. In order to ground paternal rights and obligations in a satisfactory way, we need to disaggregate the various elements of stereotypical paternity. It is not sufficient merely to separate social from biological paternity. The latter concept, itself, is complex. We need to separate the procreative element of paternity from the genetic relationship.
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  31. Parental Rights and Due Process.Donald C. Hubin - 1999 - The Journal of Law and Family Studies 1 (2):123-150.
    The U.S. Supreme Court regards parental rights as fundamental. Such a status should subject any legal procedure that directly and substantively interferes with the exercise of parental rights to strict scrutiny. On the contrary, though, despite their status as fundamental constitutional rights, parental rights are routinely suspended or revoked as a result of procedures that fail to meet even minimal standards of procedural and substantive due process. This routine and cavalier deprivation of parental rights takes place in the context of (...)
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  32. Cultural Branding, Geographic Source Indicators and Commodification.Gordon Hull - 2016 - Theory, Culture and Society 33 (2):125-145.
    One strategy for indigenous producers competing with global capital is to obtain geographic source protection (a form of trademark) for products traditionally associated with a cultural grouping or region. The strategy is controversial, and this article adds an additional reason to be cautious about adopting it. Specifically, consumers increasingly consume brands not for the products they designate but for the affiliation with the brands themselves. Since the benefits of source protection depend upon a consumer's desire to have a product actually (...)
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  33. “Extreme" Porn? The Implications of a Label.Steve Jones - 2016 - Porn Studies:1-13.
    Despite its prevalence, the term ‘extreme’ has received little critical attention. ‘Extremity’ is routinely employed in ways that imply its meanings are self-evident. However, the adjective itself offers no such clarity. This article focuses on one particular use of the term – ‘extreme porn’ – in order to illustrate a broader set of concerns about the pitfalls of labelling. The label ‘extreme’ is typically employed as a substitute for engaging with the term’s supposed referents (here, pornographic content). In its contemporary (...)
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  34. Unscharfe Grenzen im Umwelt- und Technikrecht.Geert Keil & Ralf Poscher (eds.) - 2012 - Nomos.
    Die Beiträge dieses Bandes untersuchen die Logik schwieriger Grenzziehungen im Umwelt- und Technikrecht aus juristischer, philosophischer, sozial- und ingenieurswissenschaftlicher Perspektive. Sie sind aus der interdisziplinären Tagung "Unscharfe Grenzen im Umwelt- und Technikrecht" hervorgegangen, die im März 2011 an der RWTH Aachen stattgefunden hat.
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  35. Legal Fallibilism: Law (Like Science) as a Form of Community Inquiry.Frederic R. Kellogg - 2009 - Discipline Filosofiche 19 (2).
    Fallibilism, as a fundamental aspect of pragmatic epistemology, can be illuminated by a study of law. Before he became a famous American judge, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., along with his friends William James and Charles Sanders Peirce, associated as presumptive members of the Metaphysical Club of Cambridge in the 1870s, recalled as the birthplace of pragmatism. As a young scholar, Holmes advanced a concept of legal fallibilism as incremental community inquiry. In this early work, I suggest that Holmes treats common (...)
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  36. Freedom of Memory Today.Adam Kolber - 2008 - Neuroethics 1 (2):145-148.
    Emerging technologies raise the possibility that we may be able to treat trauma victims by pharmaceutically dampening factual or emotional aspects of their memories. Such technologies raise a panoply of legal and ethical issues. While many of these issues remain off in the distance, some have already arisen. In this brief commentary, I discuss a real-life case of memory erasure. The case reveals why the contours of our freedom of memory—our limited bundle of rights to control our memories and be (...)
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  37. Review of Sovereignty’s Promise: The State as Fiduciary by Evan Fox-Decent. [REVIEW]Matthew Lister - 2012 - Ethics 123 (1):150-4.
    In Sovereignty’s Promise: The State as Fiduciary, Evan Fox-Decent uses the idea of fiduciary relationships to explain the legitimate exercise of governmental authority. He makes use of the idea of the state as a fiduciary for the people to ground an account of the duty to obey the law, to explain the proper relationships between colonial (or “settler”) societies and aboriginal populations, the role of agency discretion and judicial review in the administrative state, the rule of law, the relationship between (...)
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  38. Gang-Related Asylum Claims: An Overview and Prescription.Matthew J. Lister - 2008 - University of Memphis Law Review 38 (4).
    Over the last several years asylum cases relating to activities of criminal gangs have greatly increased in frequency. Cases involving Central American gangs, the so-called maras, have attracted the most attention but similar cases have arisen out of South Eastern and Eastern Europe as well. Applicants in such cases face a number of difficulties as their cases do not fit into paradigm categories for asylum claims. These cases almost always involve non-state actors, for example, acting for reasons that are not, (...)
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  39. Science Gone Astray: Evolution and Rape. [REVIEW]Elisabeth A. Lloyd - 2001 - Michigan Law Review 99 (6):1536-1559.
    This is a critique of "A Natural History of Rape: Biological Bases of Sexual Coercion" (Thornhill & Palmer, 2000). Lloyd argues that they have failed to do "excellent science" as required to defend themselves against criticism. As an example, Lloyd contends that they make conclusions which depend on rape being a single trait, while failing to prorivde any basis for such an assumption.
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  40. The Subjective Brain, Identity, and Neuroethics: A Legal Perspective.Ngaire Naffine - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (9):30-32.
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  41. Two Fallacies About Corporations.Philip Pettit - 2015 - In Subramanian Rangan (ed.), Performance and Progress: Essays on Capitalism, Business, and Society. Oxford University Press. pp. 379-394.
    One of the most important challenges for political theory is to identify the extent to which corporations should be facilitated and restricted in law. By way of background to that challenge, we need to develop a view about the nature and potential of corporations and corporate bodies in general. This chapter discusses two fallacies that we should avoid in this exercise. One, a claim popular among economists, that corporate bodies are not really agents at all. The other, a claim associated (...)
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  42. The Presumption of Liberty and Coerciveness of the State.Cindy Phillips - 2016 - Jurisprudence 7 (3):557-574.
    A dominant belief in political philosophy is that states must be entitled to authorize the use of coercion in order to justifiably coerce its subjects (Lamond 2001, Ripstein 2004). Call this view the entitlement view. On this view, for a state to justifiably coerce its subjects, a necessary condition is that it is entitled (or has a right) to authorize the use of coercion. Skeptics hold the entitlement view (Simmons 1979, Wolff 1970). However, they deny that states are entitled to (...)
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  43. Freedom of Information.David T. Risser - 2001 - In Derek Jones (ed.), Censorship: A World Encyclopedia (vol. 2). Fitzroy Dearborn:881-883.
  44. Procedural Justice.Lawrence B. Solum - 2004 - Southern California Law Review 78:181.
    "Procedural Justice" offers a theory of procedural fairness for civil dispute resolution. The core idea behind the theory is the procedural legitimacy thesis: participation rights are essential for the legitimacy of adjudicatory procedures. The theory yields two principles of procedural justice: the accuracy principle and the participation principle. The two principles require a system of procedure to aim at accuracy and to afford reasonable rights of participation qualified by a practicability constraint. The Article begins in Part I, Introduction, with two (...)
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  45. Should Parents Be Licensed? Debating the Issues.Peg Tittle (ed.) - 2004 - Prometheus.
    Would-be teachers are generally required to study fulltime for at least eight months before the state will allow them the responsibility of educating children for six hours a day. Many would say we have set the bar too low. And yet we haven’t even set the bar as high — in fact we haven’t set a bar at all — for parents. Should there be a national parenting policy, including mandatory parenthood training and screening of prospective parents? In this informative (...)
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  46. Privacy and Punishment.Mark Tunick - 2013 - Social Theory and Practice 39 (4):643-668.
    Philosophers have focused on why privacy is of value to innocent people with nothing to hide. I argue that for people who do have something to hide, such as a past crime, or bad behavior in a public place, informational privacy can be important for avoiding undeserved or disproportionate non-legal punishment. Against the objection that one cannot expect privacy in public facts, I argue that I might have a legitimate privacy interest in public facts that are not readily accessible, or (...)
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  47. Is the Non-Rivalrousness of Intellectual Objects a Problem for the Moral Justification of Economic Rights to Intellectual Property?Jukka Varelius - 2015 - Science and Engineering Ethics 21 (4):895-906.
    It is often argued that the fact that intellectual objects—objects like ideas, inventions, concepts, and melodies—can be used by several people simultaneously makes intellectual property rights impossible or particularly difficult to morally justify. In this article, I assess the line of criticism of intellectual ownership in connection with a central category of intellectual property rights, economic rights to intellectual property. I maintain that it is unconvincing.
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  48. Is the Expiration of Intellectual Property Rights a Problem for Non-Consequentialist Theories of Intellectual Property?Jukka Varelius - 2014 - Res Publica 20 (4):345-357.
    The expiration of intellectual property rights has been seen to amount to a problem for non-consequentialist theories of intellectual property. In this article, I assess whether the difficulty is real. I maintain that, as things are at least, there is no sufficient reason to believe that the termination of intellectual property rights is an insurmountable problem for non-consequentialist theories of intellectual property rights.
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  49. Reciprocity and Neuroscience in Public Health Law.A. M. Viens - 2011 - In Michael Freeman (ed.), Law and Neuroscience. Oxford University Press.
    There is an underdeveloped potential for using neuroscience as a particular input in the process of law-making. This paper examines one such instance in the area of public health law. Neuroscience could play an important role in elucidating and strengthening the relevance of the conditions underlying and re-enforcing our ability to cooperate in balancing the benefits and burdens necessary to achieve particular goods; for instance, the protection of public health in an outbreak of pandemic influenza. In particular, I shall focus (...)
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  50. Morality Provisions in Law Concerning the Commercialization of Human Embryos and Stem Cells.A. M. Viens - 2009 - In Aurora Plomer & Paul Torremans (eds.), Embryonic Stem Cell Patents: European Patent Law and Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    The aim of establishing a consistent and unified approach in law concerning the ethics of commercializing human embryos and their derivative parts, products, or related technologies remains incomplete within the European Union. In an attempt to elucidate these problems and implications, I examine three separate moral considerations (i.e., exploitation, commodification, and objectification) that could be used to ground the putative wrongness associated with commercializing stem cells—in particular patenting these materials. It is argued that the moral justification for legal prohibitions on (...)
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