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  1. Long-Lasting Coma.Sergio Bagnato, Cristina Boccagni, A. Sant'Angelo, Alexander A. Fingelkurts, Andrew A. Fingelkurts, C. Gagliardo & G. Galardi - 2014 - Functional Neurology 29 (3):201-205.
    In this report, we describe the case of a patient who has remained in a comatose state for more than one year after a traumatic and hypoxic brain injury. This state, which we refer to as long-lasting coma (LLC), may be a disorder of consciousness with significantly different features from those of conventional coma, the vegetative state, or brain death. On the basis of clinical, neurophysiological and neuroimaging data, we hypothesize that a multilevel involvement of the ascending reticular activating system (...)
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  2. Thinking About the Experience of Dementia: The Importance of the Unconscious.Andrew Balfour - 2006 - Journal of Social Work Practice 20 (3):329-346.
  3. Disturbances of Conscious in Dementia with Lewy Bodies Assocated with Alterantion in Nicotonic Receoptor Binding in the Temporal Cortex.Clive Ballard - 2002 - Consciousness and Cognition 11 (3):461-474.
    Disturbances of consciousness, including fluctuations in attention and awareness, are a common and clinically important symptom in dementia with Lewy bodies . In the present study we investigate potential mechanisms of such disturbances of consciousness in a clinicopathological study evaluating specific components of the cholinergic system. [3H]Epibatidine binding to the high-affinity nicotinic receptor in the temporal cortex differentiated DLB cases with and without DOC, being 62–66% higher in those with DOC . The were no differences between DLB patients with or (...)
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  4. Korsakoff and Amnesia.William P. Banks - 1995 - Consciousness and Cognition 5 (1-2):22-26.
  5. Disorders of Consciousness.D. Bates & N. Cartlidge - 1994 - In E. Critchley (ed.), The Neurological Boundaries of Reality. Farrand.
  6. The Cognitive Psychophysiology of Prosopagnosia.Russell M. Bauer - 1986 - In H. Ellis, M. Jeeves, F. Newcombe & Andrew W. Young (eds.), Aspects of Face Processing. Martinus Nijhoff. pp. 253--267.
  7. Congenital Prosopagnosia: Face-Blind From Birth.Marlene Behrmann & Galia Avidan - 2005 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (4):180-187.
  8. Clinical Pathologies and Unusual Experiences.Richard P. Bentall - 2007 - In Max Velmans & Susan Schneider (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Consciousness. Blackwell.
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  9. Cognition in Dyschiria: Edoardo Bisiach's Theory of Spatial Disorders and Consciousness.Anna Berti - 2004 - Cortex 40 (2):275-80.
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  10. Why Are We Certain That We Exist?Alexandre Billon - 2015 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 91 (3):723-759.
    Descartes was certain that he was thinking and he was accordingly certain that he existed. Like Descartes, we seem to be more certain of our thoughts and our existence than of anything else. What is less clear is the reason why we are thus certain. Philosophers throughout history have provided different interpretations of the cogito, disagreeing both on the kind of thoughts it characterizes and on the reasons for its cogency. According to what we may call the empiricist interpretation of (...)
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  11. Consciousness in Dyschiria.E. Bisiach & Anna Berti - 1995 - In M. Gazzniga (ed.), The Cognitive Neurosciences. MIT Press.
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  12. Mindwaves: Thoughts on Intelligence, Identity, and Consciousness.Colin Blakemore & Susan A. Greenfield - 1987 - Blackwell.
  13. Consciousness and Epilepsy: Why Are Patients with Absence Seizures Absent?H. Blumenfeld - 2006 - In Steven Laureys (ed.), Boundaries of Consciousness. Elsevier.
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  14. Experimental Analysis of Hysterical Blindness.J. P. Brady & D. L. Lind - 1961 - Archives of General Psychiatry 4:331-39.
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  15. Psychotic Consciousness.Peter Chadwick - 2001 - International Journal of Social Psychiatry 47 (1):52-62.
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  16. Editorial: Pathologies of Awareness: Bridging the Gap Between Theory and Practice.Linda Clare & Peter W. Halligan - 2006 - Neuropsychological Rehabilitation 16 (4):353-355.
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  17. Disturbances of Consciousness in Dementia with Lewy Bodies Associated with Alteration in Nicotinic Receptor Binding in the Temporal Cortex.G. Ballard Clive, A. Jennifer, Piggott Margaret, Johnson Mary, O'Brien John, McKeith Ian, Clive Holmes, Peter Lantos, Evelyn Jaros & Robert Perry - 2002 - Consciousness and Cognition 11 (3).
  18. Who Knows Best? Awareness of Divided Attention Difficulty in a Neurological Rehabilitation Setting.Josephine Cock, Claire Fordham, Janet Cockburn & Patrick Haggard - 2003 - Brain Injury 17 (7):561-574.
  19. Scientific Approaches to Consciousness.Jonathan D. Cohen & Jonathan W. Schooler (eds.) - 1997 - Lawrence Erlbaum.
  20. The Phenomenology of Agency and Intention in the Face of Paralysis and Insentience.Jonathan Cole - 2007 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 6 (3):309-325.
    Studies of perception have focussed on sensation, though more recently the perception of action has, once more, become the subject of investigation. These studies have looked at acute experimental situations. The present paper discusses the subjective experience of those with either clinical syndromes of loss of movement or sensation (spinal cord injury, sensory neuronopathy syndrome or motor stroke), or with experimental paralysis or sensory loss. The differing phenomenology of these is explored and their effects on intention and agency discussed. It (...)
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  21. "Self-Consciousness and the Body": Commentary.Jonathan Cole - 2000 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (6):50-52.
    Traditionally, what we are conscious of in self-consciousness is something non-corporeal. But anti-Cartesian philosophers argue that the self is as much corporeal as it is mental. Because we have the sense of proprioception, a kind of body awareness, we are immediately aware of ourselves as bodies in physical space. In this debate the case histories of patients who have lost their sense of proprioception are clearly relevant. These patients do retain an awareness of themselves as corporeal beings, although they hardly (...)
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  22. Neurological Disorders and the Structure of Human Consciousness.Jeffrey W. Cooney & Michael S. Gazzaniga - 2003 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (4):161-165.
  23. Prosopagnosia: Anatomic and Physiologic Aspects.R. Damasio, H. Damasio & D. Tranel - 1986 - In H. Ellis, M. Jeeves, F. Newcombe & Andrew W. Young (eds.), Aspects of Face Processing. Martinus Nijhoff. pp. 268--272.
  24. Observations on a Case of Prosopagnosia.Jules Davidoff, W. Bryan Matthews & Freda Newcombe - 1986 - In H. Ellis, M. Jeeves, F. Newcombe & Andrew W. Young (eds.), Aspects of Face Processing. Martinus Nijhoff. pp. 279--290.
  25. Out of Mind: Varieties of Unconscious Processes.Beatrice De Gelder, Edward H. F. De Haan & Charles A. Heywood (eds.) - 2001 - Oxford University Press.
    Can we learn without consciousness? When the eminent neuropsychologist, Lawrence Weiskrantz first coined the term 'blindsight' to describe a condition whereby a patient could demonstrate that they were aware of some object, yet insist that they were completely unaware of its existence, the response from some in the scientific community was one of extreme skepticism. Even now, there are those who question the existence of unconscious learning, and the topic remains one of the most actively researched and debated in psychology. (...)
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  26. Face Recognition Without Awareness.Edward H. F. de Haan, Andrew W. Young & F. Newcombe - 1987 - Cognitive Neuropsychology 4:385-415.
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  27. Current Issues in Prosopagnosia.E. de Renzi - 1986 - In H. Ellis, M. Jeeves, F. Newcombe & Andrew W. Young (eds.), Aspects of Face Processing. Martinus Nijhoff.
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  28. Is the Threat Simulation Theory Threatened by Recurrent Dreams?Sophie Desjardins & Antonio Zadra - 2006 - Consciousness and Cognition 15 (2):470-474.
    Zadra, Desjardins, and Marcotte tested several predictions derived from the Threat Simulation Theory of dreaming in a large sample of recurrent dreams. In response to these findings, Valli and Revonsuo presented a commentary outlining alternate conceptualizations and explanations for the results obtained. We argue that many points raised by Valli and Revonsuo do not accurately reflect our main findings and at times present a biased assessment of the data. In this article, we provide necessary clarifications and responses to each one (...)
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  29. The Case of the Missing Defendant: Medical Testimony in Trials of the Unconscious.Joel P. Eigen - 2006 - Harvard Review of Psychiatry 14 (3):177-181.
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  30. Aspects of Face Processing.H. Ellis, M. Jeeves, F. Newcombe & Andrew W. Young (eds.) - 1986 - Martinus Nijhoff.
    INTRODUCTION TO ASPECTS OF FACE PROCESSING: TEN QUESTIONS IN NEED OF ANSWERS. HD Ellis 1. INTRODUCTION These proceedings of the first international ...
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  31. The Neural Correlates of 'Deaf-Hearing' in Man.Almut Engelien, W. Huber, D. Silbersweig, Christopher D. Frith & R. S. J. Frachowiak - 2000 - Brain 123:532-545.
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  32. Consciousness.Martha J. Farah - 2001 - In B. Rapp (ed.), The Handbook of Cognitive Neuropsychology: What Deficits Reveal About the Human Mind. Psychology Press/Taylor & Francis.
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  33. Perception and Awareness After Brain Damage.Martha J. Farah - 1994 - Current Opinion in Neurobiology 4:252-55.
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  34. Visual Perception and Visual Awareness After Brain Damage: A Tutorial Overview.Martha J. Farah - 1994 - In Carlo Umilta & Morris Moscovitch (eds.), Consciousness and Unconscious Information Processing: Attention and Performance 15. MIT Press. pp. 203--236.
  35. Visual Agnosia: Disorders of Object Recognition and What They Tell Us About Normal Vision.Martha J. Farah - 1990 - MIT Press.
  36. Disorders of Perception and Awareness.Martha J. Farah & Todd E. Feinberg - 2000 - In Martha J. Farah & Todd E. Feinberg (eds.), Patient-Based Approaches to Cognitive Neuroscience. MIT Press.
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  37. Patient-Based Approaches to Cognitive Neuroscience.Martha J. Farah & Todd E. Feinberg (eds.) - 2000 - MIT Press.
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  38. Consciousness of Perception After Brain Damage.Martha J. Farah & Todd E. Feinberg - 1997 - Seminars in Neurology 17:145-52.
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  39. The Neural Correlates of Perceptual Awareness: Evidence From Covert Recognition in Prosopagnosia.Martha J. Farah, R. C. O'Reilly & Shaun P. Vecera - 1997 - In Jonathan D. Cohen & Jonathan W. Schooler (eds.), Scientific Approaches to Consciousness. Lawrence Erlbaum.
  40. The Neuropsychology of High-Level Vision.Martha J. Farah & G. Ratcliff (eds.) - 1994 - Lawrence Erlbaum.
    This book provides a state-of-the-art review of high-level vision and the brain.
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  41. Unconscious Recognition in Prosopagnosia-an Alternative Explanation.Mj Farah, Rc Oreilly & Sp Vecera - 1991 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 29 (6):524-524.
  42. The Decoupling of "Explicit" and "Implicit" Processing in Neuropsychological Disorders: Insights Into the Neural Basis of Consciousness?Deborah Faulkner & Jonathan K. Foster - 2002 - Psyche 8 (2).
    A key element of the distinction between explicit and implicit cognitive functioning is the presence or absence of conscious awareness. In this review, we consider the proposal that neuropsychological disorders can best be considered in terms of a decoupling between preserved implicit or unconscious processing and impaired explicit or conscious processing. Evidence for dissociations between implicit and explicit processes in blindsight, amnesia, object agnosia, prosopagnosia, hemi-neglect, and aphasia is examined. The implications of these findings for a) our understanding of a (...)
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  43. Some Interesting Perturbations of the Self in Neurology.Todd E. Feinberg - 1997 - Seminars in Neurology 17:129-35.
  44. Where in the Brain is the Self?Todd E. Feinberg & Julian Paul Keenan - 2005 - Consciousness and Cognition 14 (4):671-678.
    Localizing the self in the brain has been the goal of consciousness research for centuries. Recently, there has been an increase in attention to the localization of the self. Here we present data from patients suffering from a loss of self in an attempt to understand the neural correlates of consciousness. Focusing on delusional misidentification syndrome , we find that frontal regions, as well as the right hemisphere appear to play a significant role in DMS and DMS related disorders. These (...)
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  45. Visual Perception Without Awareness in a Patient with Posterior Cortical Atrophy: Impaired Explicit but Not Implicit Processing of Global Information.J. Vincent Filoteo, Frances J. Friedrich, Catherine Rabbel & John L. Stricker - 2002 - Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society 8 (3):461-472.
  46. Clinical Pragmatism and the Care of Brain Damaged Patients: Towards a Palliative Neuroethics for Disorders of Consciousness.Joseph J. Fins - 2006 - In Steven Laureys (ed.), Boundaries of Consciousness. Elsevier.
  47. Consciousness.J. A. M. Fredericks - 1969 - In P. Vinken & G. Bruyn (eds.), Handbook of Clinical Neurology. North Holland.
  48. The Cognitive Neurosciences.Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.) - 1995 - MIT Press.
  49. Disorders of Consciousness: Differential Diagnosis and Neuropathologic Features.Joseph T. Giacino - 1997 - Seminars in Neurology 17:105-11.
  50. Toward an Empirical Basis for Understanding Consciousness and Self-Awareness.K. R. Gibson - 1992 - Consciousness and Cognition 1 (2):163-68.
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