About this topic
Summary

The term ‘pacifism’ is used to describe a range of positions and historical movements, broadly characterised by a general rejection of violence. Positions range from an absolute and principled rejection of violence (such that violence can never be justified), to contingent pacifisms that accept that violence may in principle be justified, but the necessary conditions for its justification cannot be met given existing practices. Furthermore, pacifism can be understood as a personal ethic (including conscientious objection), a critique of predominant political institutions (anti-warism), or as an alternative political theory (with connections to anarchism and feminism). While there is some recent work that attempts to characterise pacifism in terms of the Just War tradition (JWT), pacifism is generally considered an alternative tradition, broadly critical of JWT’s central premises.

Introductions

The Stanford Encyclopedia entry Fiala 2008 is a good introduction to the topic, as is Peter Brock’s historical survey [Brock 1998 Varieties of Pacifism].

Related categories

254 found
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1 — 50 / 254
  1. added 2020-03-17
    Acting Out the Kingdom of God. [REVIEW]Charles K. Fink - 2019 - The Acorn 19 (1):48-53.
    Review of Tolstoy and Spirituality (Academic Studies Press, 2018), edited by Pedrag Cicovacki and Heidi Nada Grek, with articles by Miran Bozovic, Predrag Cicovacki, Abdusalam A. Guseynov, Robert Holmes, Božidar Kante, Rosamund Bartlett, Diana Dukhanova, Liza Knapp, Inessa Medzhibovskaya, Donna Tussing Orwin, Mikhail Shishkin, and Alexandra Smith.
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  2. added 2020-03-17
    The Pacifist Tradition and Pacifism as Transformative and Critical Theory.Andrew Fiala - 2018 - The Acorn 18 (1):5-28.
    Pacifism is often painted into a corner as an absolute rejection of all violence and war. Such a dogmatic and negative formulation of pacifism does leave us with pacifism as a morally problematic position. But pacifism is not best understood as a negative claim. Nor is pacifism best understood as a singular or monistic concept. Rather, there is a “pacifist tradition” that is grounded in an affirmative claim about the importance of nonviolence, love, community building, and peaceful conflict resolution. This (...)
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  3. added 2020-03-17
    Remembering Mulford Q. Sibley.Duane L. Cady - 2018 - The Acorn 18 (1):77-79.
    Sibley was a prolific writer and speaker on pacifism, civil disobedience, and utopianism. His many publications include articles and books on these topics. My favorite is his highly respected The Quiet Battle: Writings on the Theory and Practice of Nonviolent Resistance, an anthology of major-–as well as less well-known—sources on pacifism and nonviolence, meticulously edited, with rich and insightful introductions and concluding reflections by Sibley. There are many tales to be told of Sibley’s adventures as a pacifist in the academy (...)
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  4. added 2020-03-17
    Pacifism and Nonviolence as Philosophical Mandate.Greg Moses - 2018 - The Acorn 18 (1):1-4.
    Long about 2014 or 2015 Andrew Fiala was negotiating the title of a handbook project. Meanwhile, in March of 2016, editors of The Acorn were deliberating a revised subtitle for the journal. Both projects landed on the same key terms: pacifism and nonviolence. A zeitgeist was afoot. In this volume, we present Fiala’s framing of philosophical pacifism. Exemplary virtues still by and large belong to the warrior (nor are we here to dismiss the warrior’s honor as such.) Yet, as Steven (...)
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  5. added 2020-03-17
    Burdens of Warism.Rick Werner - 2017 - The Acorn 17 (1):82-87.
    Robert Holmes’ Pacifism is the most complete, most detailed in argument, and most compelling book on pacifism I have read. It is not an easy book, for “all things excellent are as difficult as they are rare.” It deserves a careful read, many reads, by anyone who cares about war and the war system we are. It is a fitting testimony to Holmes’ excellence as a philosopher in the truest sense of that word--so uncommon in the halls of the academy, (...)
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  6. added 2020-03-17
    A Machiavellian Approach to Pacifism. [REVIEW]Court Lewis - 2016 - The Acorn 16 (1-2):59-61.
    Sara Trovato’s Mainstreaming Pacifism: Conflict, Success, and Ethics provides a thorough and engaging argument for why pacifism is an effectual means for creating social-political justice and peace. Standing up to claims that pacifists are politically passive and accepting of injustice, Trovato shows that the peace of pacifism is compatible with the fight for justice. By showing that pacifists can consistently retain their ideals while fighting for justice, Trovato offers an alternative to effective means of violence. In her words, “violence can (...)
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  7. added 2020-03-05
    The Routledge Handbook of Pacifism and Nonviolence.Andrew Fiala (ed.) - 2018 - Routledge.
    Interest in pacifism—an idea with a long history in philosophical thought and in several religious traditions—is growing. The Routledge Handbook of Pacifism and Nonviolence is the first comprehensive reference designed to introduce newcomers and researchers to the many varieties of pacifism and nonviolence, to their history and philosophy, and to pacifism’s most serious critiques. The volume offers 32 brand new chapters from the world’s leading experts across a diverse range of fields, who together provide a broad discussion of pacifism and (...)
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  8. added 2020-02-16
    Revolution of Conscience: MLK, Jr. And the Philosophy of Nonviolence (Kindle E-Book Edition).Greg Moses - 2018 - Austin, TX: Kindle.
    Martin Luther King, Jr. developed a philosophical logic of nonviolence in terms of equality, structure, nonviolent direct action, and love. Here we look at the way King's analysis makes use of each concept with a special view to the context of other Black activist intellectuals. This ebook is a slightly edited version of earlier print editions.
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  9. added 2020-02-11
    Peace and Revolution: The Moral Crisis of American Pacifism.Jan Narveson - 1990 - Ethics 100 (3):685-686.
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  10. added 2020-02-08
    Pacifism in the Modern World.Vergilius Ferm - 1931 - International Journal of Ethics 41 (4):526-528.
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  11. added 2019-12-27
    Capitini, Aldo.Sergio Volodia Marcello Cremaschi - 2010 - Leksikon for Det 21. Århundrede.
    A brief presentation of life, activity and publications of an Italian philosopher, the founder with Guido Calogero of the Liberal-Socialist movement under the Fascist regime and the theorist of non-violence and omnicracy as the key ideas for a new left, beyond reformism and third-International state-socialism.
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  12. added 2019-12-23
    Catholicity Without Leviathan: Stanley Hauerwas's Perspective on the Church as an Alternative Political Community.Ionut Untea - 2019 - The Politics and Religion Journal 12 (1):1-31.
    The article brings into focus a series of political arguments of Stanley Hauerwas's “theological politics” and argues that these arguments are in stark contrast with the theoretical perspective of a political rule by a god-like Leviathan, an image inherited in modern and contemporary political culture from the early modern English philosopher Thomas Hobbes. The first section focuses on Hauerwas's arguments regarding the political potential of the term “Catholicity” to represent an alternative to the coercive politics reinforced by the post-Enlightenment nation (...)
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  13. added 2019-09-09
    Pacifism, Politics, and Feminism: Intersections and Innovations.Jennifer Kling (ed.) - 2019 - The Netherlands: Brill | Rodopi.
    This anthology explores the many and varied connections between pacifism, politics, and feminism. Each topic is often thought about in academic isolation; however, when we consider how they intersect and interact, it opens up new areas for discussion and analysis.
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  14. added 2019-08-01
    Review of Chinmoy Guha's Bridging East and West: Rabindranath Tagore and Romain Rolland Correspondence (1919–1940). [REVIEW]Subhasis Chattopadhyay - 2019 - Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India (August):623-24 & 630.
    This is a review of Guh'as magnum opus which honestly problematises Tagore's Mussolini episode.
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  15. added 2019-06-06
    Gandhian Nonviolence and the Problem of Preferable Violence.Jacob N. Bauer - 2014 - The Acorn 15 (1):26-32.
    In this article, I argue that Gandhi can prefer violence in cases, but still morally object to all forms of violence. Even though this can seem to be a contradiction, nonetheless, one can prefer an action without thinking that action is morally justified. Next, I explore the objection that preferring a violent act, such as violent self-defense, over a act that is not violent, such as running away, seems to prefer an action that is more violent to one that is (...)
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  16. added 2019-06-06
    Pacifists, Patriots, or Both?: Second Thoughts on Pre-Constantinian Early-Christian Attitudes Toward Soldiering and War.J. Daryl Charles - 2010 - Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture 13 (2):17-55.
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  17. added 2019-06-06
    Gandhian Formula of Harmony and Peace: The Unity of Truth and Non-Violence.Krishna Mani Pathak - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 33:45-51.
    Gandhi’s writings on moral issues propose an easiest formula to the world to establish harmony and peace in the global society. In a world where people are confronting a psychological fear of sudden terror and violence, the Gandhian formula of ‘non-violence as a means’ to form a perfect harmonious world is getting strong attention of the world-community. Truth and non-violence are the two most valuable ingredients of Gandhian moral thoughts. For him, Truth or God is the end and non-violence is (...)
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  18. added 2019-06-06
    Between Pacifism and Jihad: Just War and Christian Tradition. [REVIEW]Gregory B. Sadler - 2007 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 81 (1):142-147.
  19. added 2019-06-06
    Prophetic Realism: Beyond Militarism and Pacifism in an Age of Terror. By Ronald H. Stone: Book Reviews. [REVIEW]Kevin Carnahan - 2007 - Heythrop Journal 48 (4):655-657.
  20. added 2019-06-06
    Six Motives of Justified Disobedience: A Case Study on the First Chechen War.Boris Kashnikov - 2002 - Professional Ethics, a Multidisciplinary Journal 10 (2/3/4):197-206.
  21. added 2019-06-06
    Evaluating Pacifism.Brian Orend - 2001 - Dialogue 40 (1):3-24.
    A contemporary Kantian perspective, loosely defined, is a cosmopolitan moral doctrine, focused on human rights protection, and framed as a general set of rules meant to guide state conduct. The core propositions of just-war theory, presupposed here, are that: moral norms are relevant to judging state conduct in the international arena; and sometimes it is morally permissible for a state to resort to war in the international arena. In general, it is permissible for a state to do so in order (...)
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  22. added 2019-06-06
    Pacifism and Wartime Innocence: A Response.Robert L. Holmes - 1994 - Social Theory and Practice 20 (2):193-202.
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  23. added 2019-06-06
    The Irreconcilability of Pacifism and Just War Theory: A Response to Sterba.Eric Reitan - 1994 - Social Theory and Practice 20 (2):117-134.
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  24. added 2019-06-06
    Christianity and Pacifism: A Reply to Kellenberger.Selmer Bringsjord - 1989 - Faith and Philosophy 6 (1):88-94.
    In a recent issue of Faith and Philosophy, James Kellenberger argues that the “ethics of love” aspect of Christianity entails pacifism, In response, I present an argument designed to show that Christian doctrine entails the falsity of pacifism, I go on to show, however, that the spirit of Kellenberger’s point may survive, for perhaps Christ’s teaching regarding “mental sin” prohibits the war-related activity known as nuclear deterrence.
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  25. added 2019-06-06
    A Certain Just War, A Certain Pacifism.John J. Conley - 1985 - Thought: Fordham University Quarterly 60 (2):242-257.
  26. added 2019-06-06
    Just War Pacifism.Kenneth H. Wenker - 1983 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 57:135.
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  27. added 2019-01-15
    Violence, Nonviolence, and the Palestinian National Movement.Wendy Pearlman - 2011 - Cambridge University Press.
    Why do some national movements use violent protest and others nonviolent protest? Wendy Pearlman shows that much of the answer lies inside movements themselves. Nonviolent protest requires coordination and restraint, which only a cohesive movement can provide. When, by contrast, a movement is fragmented, factional competition generates new incentives for violence and authority structures are too weak to constrain escalation. Pearlman reveals these patterns across one hundred years in the Palestinian national movement, with comparisons to South Africa and Northern Ireland. (...)
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  28. added 2019-01-15
    Freedom and its Realization in Gandhi's Philosophy and Practice of Non-Violence.James Brown Mcginnis - 1974 - Dissertation, Saint Louis University
  29. added 2019-01-07
    Humanitarian Intervention and the Problem of Genocide and Atrocity.Jennifer Kling - 2018 - In Andrew Fiala (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Pacifism and Nonviolence. London, UK: Routledge. pp. 327-346.
    We tend to think that mass atrocities and attempted genocides call for humanitarian intervention by other states. (Nonviolent intervention if possible, military intervention if need be.) In this chapter, I discuss these two related claims in turn. What, if anything, justifies humanitarian intervention in certain states by other states? Ought such interventions, if justified, be pacifist in nature, or is it legitimate in some cases to intervene violently? To discuss these questions, I draw primarily on principles and arguments found in (...)
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  30. added 2018-05-31
    Defense with Dignity: How the Dignity of Violent Resistance Informs the Gun Rights Debate.Dan Demetriou - manuscript
    Abstract: Perhaps the biggest disconnect between philosophers and non-philosophers on gun rights is over the importance of arms to our dignitary interests. This essay argues that we have a strong prima facie moral right to resist with dignity and that (with certain qualifications) violent resistance is more dignified than nonviolent resistance. Since in some cases dignified resistance will require violence, and since effective violent resistance will sometimes require guns, we have a strong prima facie right to own or carry guns (...)
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  31. added 2018-05-07
    Terrorism and Pacifism: Why We Should Condemn Both.Jan Narveson - 2003 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 17 (2):157-172.
    Pacifism and terrorism are at opposite ends of one spectrum: pacifists have too many friends; terrorists have too many enemies. The indiscriminacy robs both of any credibility. Both fail to distinguish between aggressors and their victims. Discussion of terrorism, however, is complicated by insufficient attention to the distinction between noncombatants and innocents. Just War theory relies heavily on that distinction, providing protections to noncombatants as such, without going into the further question of innocence. Terrorism thus violates the restrictions on justice (...)
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  32. added 2018-03-05
    Etyka wojny a dopuszczalność zabijania.Tomasz Żuradzki - 2010 - Diametros 25:103-117.
    W artykule wykażę, że szeroko rozpowszechnione poglądy na temat norm, które obowiązują żółnierzy na wojnie, pozostają w sprzeczności z moralnością ogólną. Etyka wojny dopuszcza działania, które w zwyczajnych sytuacjach nie tylko są uznawane za moralnie niedopuszczalne, ale wydają się czynami godnymi najwyższego moralnego potępienia. Zwracam uwagę na dwie wybrane rozbieżności między etyką ogólną a etyką wojny, tj. na problem związany z istnieniem asymetrii pomiędzy atakującymi i atakowanymi oraz na kwestię tego, kto jest właściwym celem moralnie usprawiedliwionego aktu przemocy. Odrzucając stanowiska (...)
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  33. added 2018-03-05
    Etyka wojny. Antologia.Tomasz Żuradzki & Tomasz Kuniński (eds.) - 2009 - Warszawa: Wydawnictwo Naukowe PWN.
    Antologia tekstów poświęconych etycznym aspektom agresji i przemocy stosowanej przez państwo. Obejmuje teksty najwybitniejszych naukowców z dziedziny etyki praktycznej i filozofii politycznej.
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  34. added 2018-02-02
    Pacifism: A Philosophy of Nonviolence.Robert L. Holmes - 2017 - Bloomsbury.
  35. added 2017-11-22
    Varieties of Contingent Pacifism in War.Saba Bazargan-Forward - 2014 - In Helen Frowe & Gerald Lang (eds.), How We Fight. Oxford University Press. pp. 1-17.
    The destruction wrought by even just wars lends undeniable appeal to radical pacifism, according to which all wars are unjust. Yet radical pacifism is fundamentally flawed. In the past decade, a moderate and more defensible form of pacifism has emerged. According to what has been called ‘contingent pacifism’, it is very unlikely that it is morally permissible to wage any given war. This chapter develops the doctrine of contingent pacifism by distinguishing and developing various versions of it, and by assessing (...)
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  36. added 2017-06-24
    Review of Anti-Militarism. Political and Gender Dynamics of Peace by Cyntia Cockburn. [REVIEW]Marzenna Jakubczak - 2013 - Argument: Biannual Philosophical Journal 3 (1):219-220.
  37. added 2017-02-16
    Nonviolence as a Way of Life.Karen Fogliatti - 1993 - The Acorn 8 (1):14-23.
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  38. added 2017-02-14
    Mahatma Gandhi on Violence and Peace Education.Douglas Allen - 2007 - Philosophy East and West 57 (3):290-310.
    Gandhi can serve as a valuable catalyst allowing us to rethink our philosophical positions on violence, nonviolence, and education. Especially insightful are Gandhi's formulations of the multidimensionality of violence, including educational violence, and the violence of the status quo. His peace education offers many possibilities for dealing with short-term violence, but its greatest strength is its long-term preventative education and socialization. Key to Gandhi's peace education are his ethical and ontological formulations of means-ends relations; the need to uncover root causes (...)
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  39. added 2017-02-13
    Gandhian Concept of Nonviolent World Order.Sadhana Vora - 2006 - In Yajñeśvara Sadāśiva Śāstrī, Intaj Malek & Sunanda Y. Shastri (eds.), In Quest of Peace: Indian Culture Shows the Path. Bharatiya Kala Prakashan. pp. 2--548.
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  40. added 2017-02-13
    Non-Violence the Core of Religious-Experience in Gandhi.Joseph Kuttianical - 1989 - Journal of Dharma 14 (3):227-246.
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  41. added 2017-02-12
    Mimesis and nonviolence: Some reflections from research and action.Mario Roberto Solarte Rodríguez - 2010 - Universitas Philosophica 27 (55):41-66.
    RESUMEN -/- Este texto ofrece una reflexión sobre una forma concreta en la que la teoría mimética desarrollada por René Girard se ha llevado a la práctica investigativa. Discute la diferencia que marca Heidegger entre el investigar de la ciencia y el preguntar de la filosofía. Éste será el marco desde el cual Girard avanza en su pregunta por el origen, la cual rastrea hasta la violencia fundadora, omnipresente en lo sagrado de toda cultura. Esto plantea el problema de las (...)
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  42. added 2017-02-12
    Pragmatism for Pacifists.Richard Werner - 2007 - Contemporary Pragmatism 4 (2):93-115.
    Many believe some version of all three of the following. It is strongly presumptively wrong to kill children intentionally. Modern war involves killing children intentionally. Most modern wars are morally justified. These three sentences comprise an inconsistent triad. War Realism denies 1. Just War Theory denies 2. Pragmatic or Conditional Pacifism denies 3. Scrutiny reveals that one can justify, depending on the rest of what one believes, any one of the three positions but they cannot all be true. I suggest (...)
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  43. added 2017-02-09
    Gandhi's Socio-Political Philosophy: Efficacy of Non-Violent Resistance.Purabi Ghosh Roy - 2006 - The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 2:73-79.
    In today's world the need for cultivating non-violence is becoming more pronounced. Gandhi extrapolated an ideal society based on truth and nonviolence. The Bombay Chronicle in its issue of 5th April, 1930, reported "...For the first time a nation is asked by its leader to win freedom by itself accepting all the suffering and sacrifice involved. Mahatma Gandhi's success does not, therefore, merely mean the freedom of India. It will also constitute the most important contribution that any country yet made (...)
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  44. added 2017-02-03
    Gandhi on Non-Violence.Bhuvan Chandel - 2014 - Diogenes 61 (3-4):135-142.
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  45. added 2017-02-03
    Mahatma Gandhi on Violence and Peace Education.Douglas Allen - 2007 - Philosophy East and West 57 (3):290-310.
    : Gandhi can serve as a valuable catalyst allowing us to rethink our philosophical positions on violence, nonviolence, and education. Especially insightful are Gandhi's formulations of the multidimensionality of violence, including educational violence, and the violence of the status quo. His peace education offers many possibilities for dealing with short-term violence, but its greatest strength is its long-term preventative education and socialization. Key to Gandhi's peace education are his ethical and ontological formulations of means-ends relations; the need to uncover root (...)
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  46. added 2017-02-03
    William Borman, Gandhi and Non-Violence Reviewed By.Richard Sg Brown - 1987 - Philosophy in Review 7 (4):144-145.
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  47. added 2017-01-29
    On Jan Narveson’s “Pacifism: A Philosophical Analysis”.Cécile Fabre - 2015 - Ethics 125 (3):823-825,.
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  48. added 2017-01-29
    Nuclear Pacifism: "Just War" Thinking Today. [REVIEW]Russell Hardin - 1985 - Ethics 95 (3):763-765.
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  49. added 2017-01-28
    Contingent Pacifism and the Moral Risks of Participating in War.Larry May - 2011 - Public Affairs Quarterly 25 (2):95-112.
    The just war tradition began life, primarily in the writings of Augustine and other Church Fathers, as a reaction to pacifism. In my view, contemporary just war adherents should also see pacifism as their main rival. The key question of the just war tradition is how to justify war, given that war involves intentionally attacking or killing innocent people. And this justificatory enterprise is not an easy one. Today some theorists argue that some, but not all, soldiers are liable to (...)
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  50. added 2017-01-28
    The Case for Pacifism and Conscientious Objection. [REVIEW]A. C. Ewing - 1946 - Mind 55 (219):374-376.
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1 — 50 / 254