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Subcategories:See also:History/traditions: Pain

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  1. Pain and Posttraumatic Stress Symptom Clusters: A Cross-Lagged Study.Vivian de Vries, Alette E. E. de Jong, Helma W. C. Hofland & Nancy E. Van Loey - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    Pain and posttraumatic stress disorder frequently co-occur but underlying mechanisms are not clear. This study aimed to test the development and maintenance of pain and PTSD symptom clusters, i.e., intrusions, avoidance, and hyperarousal. The longitudinal study included 216 adults with burns. PTSD symptom clusters, indexed by the Impact of Event Scale-Revised, and pain, using a graphic numerical rating scale, were measured during hospitalization, 3 and 6 months post-burn. Cross-lagged panel analysis was used to test the relationships between pain and PTSD (...)
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  2. Awful noises: evaluativism and the affective phenomenology of unpleasant auditory experience.Tom Roberts - 2020 - Philosophical Studies 178 (7):2133-2150.
    According to the evaluativist theory of bodily pain, the overall phenomenology of a painful experience is explained by attributing to it two types of representational content—an indicative content that represents bodily damage or disturbance, and an evaluative content that represents that condition as bad for the subject. This paper considers whether evaluativism can offer a suitable explanation of aversive auditory phenomenology—the experience of awful noises—and argues that it can only do so by conceding that auditory evaluative content would be guilty (...)
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  3. Against Neo-Cartesianism: Neurofunctional Resilience and Animal Pain.Phil Halper, Kenneth Williford, David Rudrauf & Perry N. Fuchs - 2021 - Philosophical Psychology 34 (4):474-501.
    Several influential philosophers and scientists have advanced a framework, often called Neo-Cartesianism (NC), according to which animal suffering is merely apparent. Drawing upon contemporary neuroscience and philosophy of mind, Neo-Cartesians challenge the mainstream position we shall call Evolutionary Continuity (EC), the view that humans are on a nonhierarchical continuum with other species and are thus not likely to be unique in consciously experiencing negative pain affect. We argue that some Neo-Cartesians have misconstrued the underlying science or tendentiously appropriated controversial views (...)
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  4. A Multidimensional Phenomenal Space for Pain: Structure, Primitiveness, and Utility.Sabrina Coninx - 2021 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-21.
    Pain is often used as the paradigmatic example of a phenomenal kind with a phenomenal quality common and unique to its instantiations. Philosophers have intensely discussed the relation between the subjective feeling, which unites pains and distinguishes them from other experiences, and the phenomenal properties of sensory, affective, and evaluative character along which pains typically vary. At the center of this discussion is the question whether the phenomenal properties prove necessary and/or sufficient for pain. In the empirical literature, sensory, affective, (...)
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  5. A Hole in the Box and a Pain in the Mouth.Laurenz Casser & Henry Ian Schiller - forthcoming - Philosophical Quarterly.
    The following argument is widely assumed to be invalid: there is a pain in my finger; my finger is in my mouth; therefore, there is a pain in my mouth. The apparent invalidity of this argument has recently been used to motivate the conclusion that pains are not spatial entities. We argue that this is a mistake. We do so by drawing attention to the metaphysics of pains and holes and provide a framework for their location which both vindicates the (...)
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  6. What Experience Doesn't Teach: Pain Amnesia and a New Paradigm for Memory Research.B. G. Montero - 2020 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 27 (11-12):102-125.
    Do we remember what pain feels like? Investigations into this question have sometimes led to ambiguous or apparently contradictory results. Building on research on pain memory by Rohini Terry and colleagues, I argue that this lack of agreement may be due in part to the difficulty researchers face when trying to convey to their study's participants the type of memory they are being tasked with recalling. To address this difficulty, I introduce the concept of 'qualitative memory', which, arguably, is the (...)
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  7. Pain in Psychology, Biology and Medicine: Some Implications for Pain Eliminativism.Tudor M. Baetu - 2020 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 82:101292.
  8. Strong Representationalism and Bodily Sensations: Reliable Causal Covariance and Biological Function.Coninx Sabrina - 2021 - Philosophical Psychology 34 (2):210-232.
    Bodily sensations, such as pain, hunger, itches, or sexual feelings, are commonly characterized in terms of their phenomenal character. In order to account for this phenomenal character, many philosophers adopt strong representationalism. According to this view, bodily sensations are essentially and entirely determined by an intentional content related to particular conditions of the body. For example, pain would be nothing more than the representation of actual or potential tissue damage. In order to motivate and justify their view, strong representationalists often (...)
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  9. Pain and Spatial Inclusion: Evidence From Mandarin.Michelle Liu & Colin Klein - 2020 - Analysis 80 (2):262-272.
    The surface grammar of reports such as ‘I have a pain in my leg’ suggests that pains are objects which are spatially located in parts of the body. We show that the parallel construction is not available in Mandarin. Further, four philosophically important grammatical features of such reports cannot be reproduced. This suggests that arguments and puzzles surrounding such reports may be tracking artefacts of English, rather than philosophically significant features of the world.
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  10. Why Successful Performance in Imagery Tasks Does Not Require the Manipulation of Mental Imagery.Thomas Park - 2019 - Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 2 (X):1-11.
    Nanay (2017) argues for unconscious mental imagery, inter alia based on the assumption that successful performance in imagery tasks requires the manipulation of mental imagery. I challenge this assumption with the help of results presented in Shepard and Metzler (1971), Zeman et al. (2010), and Keogh and Pearson (2018). The studies suggest that imagery tasks can be successfully performed by means of cognitive/propositional strategies which do not rely on imagery.
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  11. Le problème de la souffrance chez Nietzsche et Parfit.Nicolas Delon - 2019 - Klesis 43:156-186.
    Dans On What Matters Parfit défénd un objectivisme moral sur lequel il espère que les philosophes finiront par converger. Au cœur de cet espoir sont des vérités normatives irréductibles telles que l’affirmation que la souffrance est intrinsèquement mauvaise. Parfit se demande si Nietzsche menace son édifice et lui consacre un chapitre entier chapeautant la discussion du désaccord moral et de la convergence, et conclut que Nietzsche soit n’est pas en vrai désaccord, soit ne raisonne pas dans des conditions satisfaisantes. Je (...)
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  12. The Scientific Study of Belief and Pain Modulation: Conceptual Problems.Miguel Farias, Guy Kahane & Nicholas Shackel - 2016 - In F. P. Mario, M. F. P. Peres, G. Lucchetti & R. F. Damiano (eds.), Spirituality, Religion and Health: From Research to Clinical Practice. New York, USA: Springer.
    We examine conceptual and methodological problems that arise in the course of the scientific study of possible influences of religious belief on the experience of physical pain. We start by attempting to identify a notion of religious belief that might enter into interesting psychological generalizations involving both religious belief and pain. We argue that it may be useful to think of religious belief as a complex dispositional property that relates believers to a sufficiently thick belief system that encompasses both cognitive (...)
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  13. Book Review: Pain in the Elderly. [REVIEW]Judith C. Ahronheim - 1997 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 25 (4):307-309.
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  14. Recent Work on Pain.Jennifer Corns - 2018 - Analysis 78 (4):737-753.
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  15. Telling the Truth About Pain: Informed Consent and the Role of Expectation in Pain Intensity.Nada Gligorov - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 9 (3):173-182.
    Health care providers are expected both to relieve pain and to provide anticipatory guidance regarding how much a procedure is going to hurt. Fulfilling those expectations is complicated by the cognitive modulation of pain perception. Warning people to expect pain or setting expectations for pain relief not only influences their subjective experience, but it also alters how nociceptive stimuli are processed throughout the sensory and discriminative pathways in the brain. In light of this, I reconsider the characterization of placebo analgesia (...)
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  16. On Defining Bruxism.W. Ceusters & B. Smith - 2018 - Studies in Health Technology and Informatics 247:551-555.
    In a series of recent publications, orofacial researchers have debated the question of how ‘bruxism’ should be defined for the purposes of accurate diagnosis and reliable clinical research. Following the principles of realism-based ontology, we performed an analysis of the arguments involved. This revealed that the disagreements rested primarily on inconsistent use of terms, so that issues of ontology were thus obfuscated by shortfalls in terminology. In this paper, we demonstrate how bruxism terminology can be improved by paying attention to (...)
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  17. The King of Pain: Aeneas, Achates and ‘Achos' in Aeneid 1.Sergio Casali - 2008 - Classical Quarterly 58 (1):181-189.
  18. Pain Research: Where We Are and Why It Matters.Jennifer Corns - 2017 - In The Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy of Pain. Routledge.
  19. Don’T Worry, This Will Only Hurt a Bit: The Role of Expectation and Attention in Pain Intensity.Nada Gligorov - 2017 - The Monist 100 (4):501-513.
    To cause pain, it is not enough to deliver a dose of noxious stimulation. Pain requires the interaction of sensory processing, emotion, and cognition. In this paper, I focus on the role of cognition in the felt intensity of pain. I provide evidence for the cognitive modulation of pain. In particular, I show that attention and expectation can influence the experience of pain intensity. I also consider the mechanisms that underlie the cognitive effects on pain. I show that all the (...)
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  20. Animals, Pain and Morality.Alan Carter - 2005 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 22 (1):17–22.
    While it is widely agreed that the infliction upon innocents of needless pain is immoral, many have argued that, even though nonhuman animals act as if they feel pain, there is no reason to think that they actually suffer painful experiences. And if our actions only appear to cause nonhuman animals pain, then such actions are not immoral. On the basis of the claim that certain behavioural responses to organismic harm are maladaptive, whereas the ability to feel pain is itself (...)
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  21. The Developmental Challenge to the Paradox of Pain.Kevin Reuter - 2017 - Erkenntnis 82 (2):265-283.
    People seem to perceive and locate pains in bodily locations, but also seem to conceive of pains as mental states that can be introspected. However, pains cannot be both bodily and mental, at least according to most conceptions of these two categories: mental states are not the kind of entities that inhabit body parts. How are we to resolve this paradox of pain? In this paper, I put forward what I call the ‘Developmental Challenge’, tackling the second pillar of this (...)
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  22. The Experiential Paradoxes of Pain.Drew Leder - 2016 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 41 (5):444-460.
    Pain is far more than an aversive sensation. Chronic pain, in particular, involves the sufferer in a complex experience filled with ambiguity and paradox. The tensions thereby established, the unknowns, pressures, and oscillations, form a significant part of the painfulness of pain. This paper uses a phenomenological method to examine nine such paradoxes. For example, pain can be both immediate sensation and mediated by complex interpretations. It is a certainty for the experiencer, yet highly uncertain in character. It pulls one (...)
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  23. A PAEAN TO PAIN: Perspective in Teaching of Philosophy.Christopher Berry Gray - 1982 - Metaphilosophy 13 (1):91-93.
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  24. The Perceptual Theory of Pain.Thomas C. Mayberry - 1978 - Philosophical Investigations 1 (1):31-40.
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  25. On the Tail‐Docking of Pigs, Human Circumcision, and Their Implications for Prevailing Opinion Regarding Pain.R. M. Williams - 2003 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 20 (1):89-93.
    In this paper, I argue for the modest claim that people's apparent indifference to animal pain may not be predicated upon speciesism. I defend that claim by developing an analogy between current attitudes toward at least some non‐human animal pain — that which pigs endure while having their tails ‘docked’— and our culture's indifference to the pain that male human infants experience while being circumcised. And I conclude that to convince more of their philosophical and social critics, ‘animal liberationists’ need (...)
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  26. On Replacing "Natural Expressions of Pain".Charles Johnson - 1979 - Behavior and Philosophy 7 (1):65.
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  27. Connecting Philosophy and Practice: Implications of Two Philosophic Approaches to Pain for Nurses' Expert Clinical Decision Making: Original Article.Barbara Pesut - 2007 - Nursing Philosophy 8 (4):256-263.
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  28. Symposium: Pain and Evil.R. M. Hare - 1964 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, Supplementary Volumes( 38:91-124.
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  29. Aesthetic Value of Paintings Affects Pain Thresholds ☆.Marina de Tommaso, Michele Sardaro & Paolo Livrea - 2008 - Consciousness and Cognition 17 (4):1152-1162.
    Pain is modulated by cognitive factors, including attention and emotions. In this study we evaluated the distractive effect of aesthetic appreciation on subjectively rated pain and multi-channel evoked potentials induced by CO2 laser stimulation of the left hand in twelve healthy volunteers. Subjects were stimulated by laser in the absence of other external stimulation and while looking at different paintings they had previously rated as beautiful, neutral or ugly. The view of paintings previously appreciated as beautiful produced lower pain scores (...)
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  30. Making Sense of Animal Pain: An Environmental Theodicy.L. Stafford Betty - 1992 - Faith and Philosophy 9 (1):65-82.
  31. Le ‘pain quotidien’ dans l’exégèse de Grégoire de Nysse.W. Rordorf - 1977 - Augustinianum 17 (1):193-199.
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  32. Wittgenstein’s Analysis of “I Know I Am In Pain”.Marcus B. Hester - 1966 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 4 (4):274-279.
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  33. Unfelt Feelings in Pain and Emotion.Stephen R. Leighton - 1986 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 24 (1):69-79.
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  34. The Potential for Unintended Consequences From Public Policy Shifts in the Treatment of Pain.J. David Haddox & Gerald M. Aronoff - 1998 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 26 (4):350-352.
    Recently, due to a number of converging factors, there have been significant shifts in public policy regarding the legitimacy of treating chronic pain with opioids. Traditional tenets handed down in medical, dental, nursing, and pharmacy education created a distinct reluctance on the part of practitioners to prescribe opioids on a continual basis. Much has been written about the reasons for these attitudes. One of the barriers that is very consistently reported by prescribers is the fear of regulatory and legal repercussions (...)
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  35. Conceiving of Pain.Brendan O'sullivan & Peter Hanks - 2008 - Dialogue 47 (2):351-376.
    ABSTRACT: In this article we aim to see how far one can get in defending the identity thesis without challenging the inference from conceivability to possibility. Our defence consists of a dilemma for the modal argument. Either "pain" is rigid or it is not. If it is not rigid, then a key premise of the modal argument can be rejected. If it is rigid, the most plausible semantic account treats "pain" as a natural-kind term that refers to its causaI or (...)
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  36. Distraction of Attention with the Use of Virtual Reality. Influence of the Level of Game Complexity on the Level of Experienced Pain.Marcin Czub & Joanna Piskorz - 2014 - Polish Psychological Bulletin 45 (4):480-487.
    : Research done in recent years shows that Virtual Reality can be an effective tool for distracting attention from pain. The purpose of this study was to test how the complexity of Virtual Environment influences the experienced intensity of thermal pain stimuli. A within-subjects design experiment was conducted, using cold pressor test for pain stimulation. Research was done on 31 students of Wroclaw Universities. Participants played games created for the purpose of the study, using head mounted displays and movement sensors. (...)
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  37. From Polyanna Syndrome to Eeyore’s Corner? Hope and Pain in Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain.Katarzyna Popiołek, Łukasz Palt & Ewa Wojtyna - 2015 - Polish Psychological Bulletin 46 (1):96-103.
    Chronic low back pain affects 50-80% of the population, while its consequences may impair the functioning of patients suffering from it, in many spheres of life. Hope is a factor which may influence coping with pain as well as cognitive reflection of pain experience. The aim of the study has been to check: 1) whether dependencies exist between hope-trait and hope-state and the perception of pain; 2) whether experiencing pain at the time of filling questionnaires matters for the assessment of (...)
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  38. Pain.Martin A. Bertman - 1973 - NTU Philosophical Review 3:73-75.
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  39. The Pains of R-George, Robot.Frank R. Harrison - 1971 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 9 (4):371-380.
  40. What the Body Commands : The Imperative Theory of Pain.Colin Klein - unknown
    In What the Body Commands, Colin Klein proposes and defends a novel theory of pain. Klein argues that pains are imperative; they are sensations with a content, and that content is a command to protect the injured part of the body. He terms this view "imperativism about pain," and argues that imperativism can account for two puzzling features of pain: its strong motivating power and its uninformative nature. Klein argues that the biological purpose of pain is homeostatic; like hunger and (...)
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  41. Pain and Consciousness in Humans. Or Why Pain Subserves the Identity and Self-Representation.Irene Venturella & Michela Balconi - 2016 - Rivista Internazionale di Filosofia e Psicologia 7 (2):166-179.
    : Traditional definitions of pain assume that an individual learns about pain through verbal usages related to the experience of injury in early life. This emphasis on the verbal correlates of pain restricts our understanding of pain to the context of adult human consciousness. In this paper we instead support the idea that our understanding of pain originates in neonatal experience and is not merely a verbally determined phenomenon. We also challenge the definition of pain as a merely sensory message (...)
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  42. Die Sin van Pyn. (The Meaning of Pain).Abraham Olivier - 2000 - South African Journal of Philosophy 19 (3):235-254.
    Most contemporary discussions about pain take place within the frame work of materialistic theories. Their general point of departure is an attempt to explain mental pain in terms of physical pain. In this article I address two major problems, which materialistic theories deal with, from within a phenomenological perspective. The first problem is to find a physiological explanation of pain that leaves space for mental pain experience. The second problem, which I focus on, consists in the attempt to offer a (...)
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  43. Visceral Disease and Pain.E. A. Pace - 1897 - Psychological Review 4 (4):405-409.
  44. Physical Pain.Henry Rutgers Marshall - 1895 - Psychological Review 2 (6):594-598.
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  45. The Pain Was Greater If It Will Happen Again: The Effect of Anticipated Continuation on Retrospective Discomfort.Jeff Galak & Tom Meyvis - 2011 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 140 (1):63-75.
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  46. The Body in Pain: The Making and Unmaking of the World.Elaine Scarry - 1988 - Oxford University Press USA.
    Part philosophical meditation, part cultural critique, The Body in Pain is a profoundly original study that has already stirred excitement in a wide range of intellectual circles. The book is an analysis of physical suffering and its relation to the numerous vocabularies and cultural forces--literary, political, philosophical, medical, religious--that confront it.Elaine Scarry bases her study on a wide range of sources: literature and art, medical case histories, documents on torture compiled by Amnesty International, legal transcripts of personal injury trials, and (...)
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  47. The Embodied Reminder of Death.Merve Ertene - 2015 - Idealistic Studies 45 (2):215-228.
    When one attempts to understand and grasp the seemingly simple fact of pain within the realm of human being, it may be inevitable for one to be caught by the question “why do I suffer from pain?” This question, like every other “why” question, belongs to a basic human attitude which cannot accept what is as it is. Considering pain as a manifestation of such an attitude is also determining it as intolerable and reading the experience of pain as an (...)
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  48. The Book of Love and Pain.Paul Fairfield - 2004 - Symposium 8 (1):145-146.
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  49. Narratives on Pain and Comfort: Casey's Story.Jay Gabb - 1996 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 24 (4):292-293.
    Pain can be a body-wrenching curse. Yet it is often a life-defining and supporting blessing!Pain is a distinct physiological event, yet it is also an emotional, social, spiritual, and economic force. Pain in its more destructive form alters lives, changes relationships, and disrupts families.Quality pain management should not be just a pharmacological response to a medical situation; it must also be a theological, ethical, and societal response to human need. Appropriate pain management is a gift to both the receiver and (...)
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  50. Narratives on Pain and Comfort: Dr. M's Story.Christine K. Cassel - 1996 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 24 (4):290-291.
    Dr. M is a fifty-nine-year-old internist with a successful practice in a major Eastern United States city. He has lived in this city his whole life and is a highly esteemed citizen. Because of his broader social concerns and energetic support of activities to improve access to health care and quality of care for the underserved, Dr. M became involved in a number of local and regional medical organizations and quickly rose to prominence as as a director of a board (...)
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