Peace and Nonviolence

Edited by Brian C. Barnett (St. John Fisher College, State University of New York (SUNY))
About this topic
Introductions Encyclopedia entries include Page 2020, Fiala 2008, and Brownlee 2007. For a brief but systemic introduction to nonviolence, see Gan 2013. For a thorough historical account of peace movements and ideas, see Cortright 2008
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  1. Between Gandhi and Black Lives Matter: The Interreligious Roots of Civil Rights Activism. [REVIEW]Gail Presbey - 2019 - The Acorn 19 (2):197-202.
    Azaransky's work highlights the theological contributions of Howard Thurman, Benjamin Mays, William Stuart Nelson, Pauli Murray and Bayard Rustin. She makes a compelling case that each of these thinker-activists needs to be better appreciated for their cutting-edge theological insights based on their thought and life experience with Mohandas Gandhi and his spiritual activism. Each reinterprets their own Christian views based on this larger worldwide experience that they have gained through study and/or travel. In this way they prefigure or lay the (...)
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  2. “Fanon on the Role of Violence in Liberation: A Comparison to Gandhi and Mandela.”.Gail M. Presbey - 1996 - In Lewis Gordon, T. Denean Sharpley-Whiting & Renee White (eds.), Frantz Fanon: A Critical Reader. Oxford, U.K.: pp. 282-296.
    Both Gandhi and Fanon used divergent medical models to come up with their analogies for political action. For Gandhi, non-invasive medicine (such as fasting), prayer, and vigil took a key role in his response to individual illness of the body. He counseled similar tactics to challenge ‘illness” or error in the body politic. Fanon, a psychiatrist trained also in medicine referred to colonialism as a gangrene germ that threatened the life of the body politic, and therefore needed to be amputated (...)
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  3. Gewalt – Versuch einer Begriffsklärung.Daniel Meßelken - 2018 - In Sarah Jäger & Ines-Jacqueline Werkner (eds.), Gewalt in der Bibel Und in Kirchlichen Traditionen: Fragen Zur Gewalt • Band 1. Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden. pp. 13-34.
    Das Spektrum dessen, was als Gewalt bezeichnet wird, ist groß. Es reicht von paradigmatischen Fällen wie kriegerischen Konflikten und Terrorismus über Mord durch Erschlagen und Körperverletzungen bis hin zu umstritteneren Beispielen wie struktureller, sozialer, psychologischer oder verbaler Gewalt. Gewalt muss daher als eine anthropologische Konstante bezeichnet werden: Die Fähigkeit, andere zu verletzen, und die Eigenschaft, von anderen verletzt zu werden, sind Teile der menschlichen Natur. Gewalt ist auch als „Universalsprache“ bezeichnet worden.
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  4. The Satanic and the Theomimetic: Distinguishing and Reconciling "Sacrifice" in René Girard and Gregory the Great.Jordan Joseph Wales - 2020 - Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 27 (1):177-214.
    Compelling voices charge that the theological notion of “sacrifice” valorizes suffering and fosters a culture of violence by the claim that Christ’s death on the Cross paid for human sins. Beneath the ‘sacred’ violence of sacrifice, René Girard discerns a concealed scapegoat-murder driven by a distortion of human desire that itself must lead to human self-annihilation. I here ask: can one speak safely of sacrifice; and can human beings somehow cease to practice the sacrifice that must otherwise destroy them? Drawing (...)
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  5. The Concept of Violence in International Theory: A Double-Intent Account.Christopher J. Finlay - 2017 - International Theory 9 (1):67-100.
    The ability of international ethics and political theory to establish a genuinely critical standpoint from which to evaluate uses of armed force has been challenged by various lines of argument. On one, theorists question the narrow conception of violence on which analysis relies. Were they right, it would overturn two key assumptions: first, that violence is sufficiently distinctive to merit attention as a category separate from other modes of human harming; second, that it is troubling in a special way that (...)
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  6. War for peace: Genealogies of a violent ideal in western and Islamic political thought.Nicholas Tampio - 2021 - Contemporary Political Theory 20 (1):45-48.
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  7. Terrorism and the Ethics of War.Stephen Nathanson - 2012 - Social Philosophy Today 28:187-198.
    The primary thesis of Terrorism and the Ethics of War is that terrorist acts are always wrong. I begin this paper by describing two views that I criticize in the book The first condemns all terrorism but applies the term in a biased way; the second defends some terrorist acts. I then respond to issues raised by the commentators. I discuss Joan McGregor’s concerns about the definition of terrorism and about how terrorism differs from other forms of violence againstinnocent people. (...)
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  8. Qu’est-ce qu’un dispositif de terreur ?Jacob Rogozinski & Andreas Wilmes - 2018 - Esprit 10 (10):85-96.
    Une religion est un dispositif de croyance qui peut s’employer dans le sens de l’émancipation ou être dévoyé par des dispositifs de domination, de persécution, voire de terreur. Les analyses du djihadisme sous-estiment trop souvent sa dimension religieuse, notamment messianique et apocalyptique.
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  9. Cultural Violence, Hegemony and Agonistic Interventions.Fuat Gürsözlü - 2018 - In Peace, Culture, and Violence. Leiden, Netherlands: Brill. pp. 84-105.
    The chapter explores Johan Galtung’s theory of cultural violence from the perspective of a hegemony centered account of the social. It argues that once we take hegemony as a central organizing idea of the social, it becomes possible to recognize the limits of Galtung’s account of cultural violence and why his response to it remains weak. It defends a politics of contestation and a politics of disruption as possible ways to counter the risks introduced by cultural violence.
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  10. TRAC: Developing Counterintelligence for Strategic Application Into the Counter-Terrorism Space.Andrew D. Henshaw - 2014 - Intelligence Analysis.
    SummaryThe practice of counterintelligence traditionally lies in its application to the function of catching spies, stopping espionage and protecting national security and the national interest. More recently though counterintelligence has matured and is frequently being deployed into fields such as counter-terrorism, however it still remains that counterintelligence is often poorly understood, and the practice of counterintelligence operations in the counter-terrorism space presents new challenges as well as conflicts of purpose with the contemporary partners of intelligence and security services such as (...)
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  11. The Ethics of War and Peace: An Introduction.Helen Frowe - 2011 - New Abington: Routledge.
    When is it right to go to war? When is a war illegal? What are the rules of engagement? What should happen when a war is over? How should we view terrorism? _The Ethics of War and Peace_ is a fresh and contemporary introduction to one of the oldest but still most relevant ethical debates. It introduces students to contemporary Just War Theory in a stimulating and engaging way, perfect for those approaching the topic for the first time. Helen Frowe (...)
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  12. Hospitality, or Kant’s Critique of Cosmopolitanism and Human Rights.Christopher Meckstroth - 2018 - Political Theory 46 (4):537-559.
    Kant’s theory of international politics and his right of hospitality are commonly associated with expansive projects of securing human rights or cosmopolitan governance beyond state borders. This article shows how this view misunderstands Kant’s criticism of the law of nations tradition as handed down into the eighteenth century as well as the logic of his radical alternative, which was designed to explain the conditions of possibility of global peace as a solution to the Hobbesian problem of a war of all (...)
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  13. Philosophers of Peace and War: Kant, Clause-Witz, Marx, Engels, and Tolstoyby GallieW. B.. New York and London: Cambridge University Press, 1978. Pp. X, 147. $12.95. [REVIEW]Richard H. Cox - 1979 - Political Theory 7 (1):149-152.
  14. Book Review: Leo Strauss: Man of Peace, by Robert Howse. [REVIEW]Seyla Benhabib - 2017 - Political Theory 45 (2):273-277.
  15. A Kantian Argument for Sovereignty Rights of Indigenous Peoples.Thomason Krista - 2014 - Public Reason 6 (1-2):21-34.
    Kant’s non-voluntarist conception of political obligation has led some philosophers to argue that he would reject self-government rights for indigenous peoples. Some recent scholarship suggests, however, that Kant’s critique of colonialism provides an argument in favor of granting self-government rights. Here I argue for a stronger conclusion: Kantian political theory not only can but must include sovereignty for indigenous peoples. Normally these rights are considered redress for historic injustice. On a Kantian view, however, I argue that they are not remedial. (...)
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  16. The International Community, Solidarity and the Duty to Aid.Larry May - 2007 - Journal of Social Philosophy 38 (1):185-203.
  17. Peace, Human Rights and Economic Development: Some Random Jottings.Suresh Desai - 1991 - Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines 7 (4):18-21.
  18. National Self-Determination: Peace Beyond Detente.Frank Cunningham - 1984 - Dialectics and Humanism 11 (2/3):457-460.
  19. On the Purpose and Content of the Journal.Barbara E. Wall - 2004 - Journal of Catholic Social Thought 1 (1):1-5.
  20. Catholic Social Teaching and the Environment Pastoral Challenge and Strategy.Walter E. Grazer - 2007 - Journal of Catholic Social Thought 4 (2):211-225.
  21. Introduction.Barbara E. Wall - 2006 - Journal of Catholic Social Thought 3 (2):225-229.
  22. “The Preferential Option for the Poor," National Health Care Reform and America's Uninsured”.Reverend Gerald S. Twomey - 2008 - Journal of Catholic Social Thought 5 (1):111-123.
  23. "One Nation From Every Tribe, Tongue and People": The Church and Strategic Peacebuilding in South Sudan.John Ashworth & Maura Ryan - 2013 - Journal of Catholic Social Thought 10 (1):47-67.
  24. Military Ethics: Guidelines for Peace and War. [REVIEW]Sterling Harwood - 1990 - Social Philosophy Today 3:438-439.
  25. The Ways of Peace: A Philosophy of Peace as Action.Anatole Anton - 1990 - Social Philosophy Today 3:432-434.
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  26. Peacemaking, Virtues, and Subjectivity.Barbara S. Andrew - 2000 - Social Philosophy Today 16:237-242.
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  27. Jesus Christ, Peacemaker: A New Theology of Peace by Terrence J. Rynne. [REVIEW]Daniel Cosacchi - 2014 - Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 24 (1):134-137.
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  28. Compendium of the Social Doctrine of the Church by Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace. [REVIEW]Steven Brust - 2005 - Catholic Social Science Review 10:276-279.
  29. The Power of Non-Violence. Richard B. Gregg.Van Meter Ames - 1935 - International Journal of Ethics 46 (1):123-124.
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  30. When Peace Breaks Out.C. Delisle Burns - 1915 - International Journal of Ethics 26 (1):82-91.
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  31. The Peace of Stralsund, 1370.David K. Bjork - 1932 - Speculum 7 (4):447-476.
  32. Federalism and World-Peace.Walter C. Breitesfeld - 1940 - New Blackfriars 21 (243):364-370.
  33. War and Peace.Joseph Clayton - 1929 - New Blackfriars 10 (108):918-924.
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  34. Pacifying Politics: Resistance, Violence, and Accountability in Seventeenth-Century Contract Theory.Deborah Baumgold - 1993 - Political Theory 21 (1):6-27.
  35. The English Language Teacher in Global Civil Society.Barbara M. Birch - 2009 - Routledge.
    How can English language teachers contribute to peace locally and globally? English language teachers and learners are located in the global civil society – an international network of civil organizations and NGOs related to human rights, the environment, and sustainable peace. English, with its special role as an international language, is a major tool for communication within this network. On the local level, many teachers are interested in promoting reconciliation and sustainable peace, but often do not know how to do (...)
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  36. Millennium Issue Ii: Psychological Contributions to Building Cultures of Peace.: A Special Issue of Peace and Conflict.Abelardo Brenes & Michael G. Wessells (eds.) - 2001 - Psychology Press.
    To build cultures of peace, one must often lay aside the "expert" label and become a student in the world who is willing to learn from other cultures in pursuit of peace. To set up an intercultural dialogue on this topic, the Committee for the Psychological Study of Peace, in conjunction with the University for Peace and the Institute for Psychological Research of the University of Costa Rica, sponsored the 6th International Symposium on the Contribution of Psychology to Peace. This (...)
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  37. Peace Talks Who Will Listen?Fred R. Dallmayr - 2004
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  38. Ambivalence, Ambiguity, and Contradiction Garrisonian Abolitionists and Nonviolence.Richard Curry & Lawrence Goodheart - 1982 - Journal of Libertarian Studies 6 (3-4):217-226.
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  39. The Crowd in Peace and War, by M. J. [REVIEW]Martin Conway - 1916 - Ethics 27:260.
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  40. Enforcing Peace.Edward M. Chapman - 1916 - Hibbert Journal 15:189.
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  41. Tension in Peace and War.G. F. Barbour - 1941 - Hibbert Journal 40:209.
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  42. WARBASSE, JAMES P. Cooperation as a Way of Peace. [REVIEW]Rudolph M. Binder - 1938 - Journal of Social Philosophy and Jurisprudence 4:362.
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  43. The Peace of Locke's Civil Societies: An Inquiry Into the Theory of the Democratic Peace.Robin Marshall Bittick - 1999 - Dissertation, The Claremont Graduate University
    This work attempts to answer the question, "Do social-contract nations tend to go to war with one another?" The current debate over the "Democratic Peace," the idea that democracies do not go to war with each other, is divided into two camps: Realism and Liberalism. Liberal theories, based on the philosophy of Immanuel Kant, assume that there are more opportunities for cooperation between nations in state of anarchy because of shared ideas and the mediating presence of international institutions. Realism, based (...)
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  44. The Discipline of Peace.Kenneth Elliott Barlow - 1942 - Faber & Faber.
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  45. Peace to War: Shifting Allegiances in the Assemblies of God. [REVIEW]Michael G. Cartwright - 2010 - Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 20 (2):153-160.
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  46. Ethical, Legal and Social Issues That Affect Peace in Contemporary India.Jayapul Azariah - 2012 - Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 22 (1):3-6.
    India is an ancient land, extending back to the Vedic civilization. India’s historical importance is recorded in the Book of Esther India formed a landmark country in the Medo-Persian Empire when King Xerxes 1 ruled over 127 countries . It is noteworthy that the Jews and the Vedic people did not mix with other national cultures of the Empire because the Jewish Laws were different targeting the social values. The Ten Commandments and Mosaic Laws were geared to keep community and (...)
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  47. From Peace to Shared Political Identities: Local, National and Multilateral Democracy in Question.Francis Cheneval & Sylvie Ramel - 2011 - .
  48. Conflict Transformation in Central Asia : Irrigation Disputes in the Ferghana Valley.C. Bichsel - 2009 - Routledge.
    This book provides the first systematic analysis of peace-building in Central Asia for inter-ethnic conflicts over water and land in the Ferghana Valley based on concrete, in-depth and on-site investigation. The core analysis centres on peace-building projects in Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan and Tajikistan by three international aid agencies –an international NGO, a bilateral governmental donor and a multilateral agency – and the shared approach which the donors developed and used for conflict transformation. Using ethnographic case material, the author critically examines both (...)
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  49. Peace and War.Éric Alliez & Antonio Negri - 2003 - Theory, Culture and Society 20 (2):109-118.
    In this article, we begin from the assertion that global war does not affirm itself as an imperial ordering power without `opacifying' every regulative idea of peace, which is thereby reduced to the status of a deceptive illusion. `Postmodern' peace, which is absolutely contemporaneous with war, is deduced from war in the guise of the `post-democratic' institution of a permanent state of exception, of a continuation of war by other means, and of a reduction of sovereignty to the imbalance of (...)
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  50. An Ethical Dilemma: Religious Fundamentalism and Peace Education.Juliet Bennett - 2011 - Ethical Perspectives 18 (2):197-228.
    Although a modus operandi throughout history, the passing down of beliefs and values from parent to child is a practice that must now be challenged. Drawing a connection between fundamentalist religious beliefs and inter-generational violence, this paper examines an ethical dilemma that lies at its crux: on the one hand, the peaceful intentions of fundamentalist believers, and on the other a number of violent consequences for individuals, society, and the world. Applying interdisciplinary religious and peace theory scholarship to the case (...)
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