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  1. Brewer's Switching Argument.André J. Abath - 2011 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 85 (1):255-277.
    In his Perception and Reason, Bill Brewer argues that one can only have empirical beliefs if one’s perceptual experiences serve as reasons for such beliefs. His argument for this idea relies on a premise according to which in order for the relations with perceptual experience to determine the contents of empirical beliefs, these relations must be reason-giving. He offers an argument for this premise, the so-called Switching Argument. In this paper, I show that the Switching Argument does not work, in (...)
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  2. Reading McDowell: On Mind and World Ed. By Nicholas H. Smith.C. Adamo - 2004 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 25 (1):185-196.
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  3. The Mind's Knowledge of Reality.George P. Adams - 1915 - Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 12 (3):57-66.
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  4. Seeing is Knowing.Zed Adams - 2012 - Review of Metaphysics 66 (1):61-88.
    There is a well-known tradition of thinkers who have argued that philosophical reflection on the lived character of everyday experience can reveal significant and sometimes surprising insights into the nature of things. Philosophers as diverse as William James, Edmund Husserl, and Ludwig Wittgenstein have all suggested that first-person experience can play an important, if not definitive, role in structuring our philosophical accounts of the world. One deep source of opposition to this tradition is the worry that first-person experience simply cannot (...)
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  5. A Critique of Mcdowell’s Demonstrative Thought in the Cognitive Process of Perception.Emmanuel Ola Akintona - 2014 - Open Journal of Philosophy 4 (3):409-415.
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  6. On Seeing: Remarks on Metzger's Laws of Seeing. [REVIEW]Liliana Albertazzi - 2011 - Axiomathes 21 (4):581-595.
    Nowadays cognitive science often views sensorial presentations and mental presentations as mutually exclusive, and they are also given separate treatment by neurophysiologists and by cognitive scientists, and some phenomena (like anomalous surfaces or various types of imagery) are reduced to either the former or the latter. Since no adequate methods for its investigation have been developed, the level of perceptual experiences analysed by Gestaltists and magnificently illustrated by Metzger in his Laws of Seeing remains unexplored. Starting from Metzger’s analyses the (...)
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  7. Sense and Perception in Greek Philosophy.D. Z. Andriopoulos - 1976 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 37 (2):280-282.
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  8. Visual Conscious Perception Could Be Grounded in a Nonconscious Sensorimotor Domain.Ulrich Ansorge, Ingrid Scharlau, Manfred Heumann & Werner Klotz - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):974-975.
    Visual conscious perception could be grounded in a nonconscious sensorimotor domain. Although invisible, information can be processed up to the level of response activation. Moreover, these nonconscious processes are modified by actual intentions. This notion bridges a gap in the theoretical framework of O'Regan & Noë.
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  9. Experience and its Modes.Gavin Ardley - 1980 - Philosophical Studies 27 (1):415-417.
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  10. Immediate Perception.David M. Armstrong - 1976 - In R. S. Cohen, P. K. Feyerabend & M. Wartofsky (eds.), Essays in Memory of Imre Lakatos. Reidel. pp. 23--35.
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  11. Desires, Magnitudes, and Orectic Penetration.Valtteri Arstila - 2016 - Philosophical Psychology 29 (8):1175-1185.
    Dustin Stokes argues for the existence of orectic penetration, a phenomenon in which a desire-like state penetrates our perceptual experience. His candidate for a case of orectic penetration is the most convincing candidate presented thus far. It is argued here that his candidate and his further arguments for the existence of orectic penetration do not support the claim that orectic penetration takes place. As a result, it is concluded that there are no convincing cases of desire-like states penetrating perceptual experience.
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  12. Perception.Edward Wilson Averill - 1996 - Philosophical Books 37 (3):200-202.
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  13. Perception and Cognition.M. B. - 1982 - Review of Metaphysics 35 (4):903-905.
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  14. The Influence of Cognition Upon Perception: The Empirical Story.Ralph Baergen - 1993 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 71 (1):13 – 23.
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  15. Man-in-Nature as a Phenomenological Datum.Kalyankumar Bagchi - 1983 - Analecta Husserliana 14:229.
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  16. The Transcendental Nature of Mind and World.Bryan Baird - 2006 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 44 (3):381-398.
    Critics of John McDowell’s Mind and World have by and large failed to take sufficient notice of the transcendental context within whichMcDowell situates his work—a failure that has adversely affected their criticisms. In this paper, I make clear this transcendental context and show how it figures in the transcendental argument I see McDowell offering in Mind and World. Interpreting McDowell’s argument in this way, I further argue, helps to answer some of the most pressing objections to what he is doing (...)
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  17. The Influence of Accommodation and Convergence on the Perception of Depth.W. J. Baird - 1904 - Philosophical Review 13:242.
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  18. Mind and the World. By John McDowell.O. Balaban - 1998 - The European Legacy 3:117-117.
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  19. Radical Reflection: Brandom and McDowell on Perception.Michael Barber - 2007 - Modern Schoolman 84 (2-3):245-265.
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  20. Reflections on Perception.Peter J. Bart - 1929 - New Scholasticism 3 (1):19-23.
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  21. Perceptual Functions in Prosopagnosia.Jason Js Bartonô½, Mariya V. Cherkasova, Daniel Z. Press, James M. IntriligatorÁ & Margaret O'Connor - 2004 - In Robert Schwartz (ed.), Perception. Malden Ma: Blackwell. pp. 939-956.
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  22. Incontinence and Perception.Greg Bassett - 2013 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (5):1019-1028.
    The traditional problem of incontinence raises the question of whether there is any way to account for action contrary to judgment. When one acts, rather than only being acted upon by circumstances, the action is explained in terms of the reasons for action one judges oneself to have. It therefore seems impossible to explain action that iscontrary to such judgment. This paper examines the question of how such explanation would be possible. After excluding accounts that either eliminate incontinence or render (...)
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  23. Open Peer Commentary.Frédéric Bassoa & Olivier Oullierb - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32:5.
  24. Problems with Explaining the Perceptual Environment.Aaron Ben-Ze'ev - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):30-31.
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  25. Apparent Approximations in Sensorimotor Transformations Are Due to Errors in Pointing.David J. Bennett & Eric P. Loeb - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (2):323-324.
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  26. The World of Perception.Michael P. Berman - 2006 - Dialogue 45 (2):410-414.
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  27. Perception and Intention.Matthew Hopkins Berry - 1999 - Dissertation, The University of Connecticut
    The guiding theme of the dissertation is that any theory of perception must also be a theory of intention. One cannot give a plausible theory of perception without an explanation of intention being front and center in the theory. The main argument presented is that current accounts of perception, both direct and indirect cannot succeed because of their inadequate accounts of perceptual intention. ;The first section of the dissertation looks at the idea that perception provides a foundation for knowledge about (...)
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  28. The Implausibility of Astral Bodies and Astral Worlds.Susan Blackmore - 2015 - In Keith Augustine & Michael Martin (eds.), The Myth of an Afterlife: The Case against Life After Death. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 393-403.
    Astral body views posit that an exotic double with a definite location in space—an astral or ethereal body—leaves the normal biological body during out-of-body experiences or after death. In this paper the severe difficulties confronting such a view are reviewed, difficulties concerning not only the nature of the double which travels, but the nature of the world in which it travels. Three exhaustive possibilities are considered: that a physical double travels in the physical world; that a nonphysical double travels in (...)
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  29. Three Experiments to Test the Sensorimotor Theory of Vision.Susan J. Blackmore - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):977-977.
    The sensorimotor theory of vision is the best attempt yet to explain visual consciousness without implying a Cartesian theatre. I suggest three experiments which might test the theory.
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  30. "Art, Perception, and Reality," by E. H. Gombrich, Julian Hochberg, and Max Black.William L. Blizek - 1976 - Modern Schoolman 53 (2):177-178.
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  31. Behaviorism Revisited.Ned Block - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):977-978.
    O'Regan and Noe declare that the qualitative character of experience is constituted by the nature of the sensorimotor contingencies at play when we perceive. Sensorimotor contingencies are a highly restricted set of input-output relations. The restriction excludes contingencies that don’t essentially involve perceptual systems. Of course if the ‘sensory’ in ‘sensorimotor’ were to be understood mentalistically, the thesis would not be of much interest, so I assume that these contingencies are to be understood non-mentalistically. Contrary to their view, experience is (...)
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  32. Experiencing Oneself or Another Person as Old.Douglas A. Bors - 1983 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 14 (1):91-104.
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  33. The Jaina Theory of Perception.Pushpa Bothra - 1976 - Motilal Banarsidass.
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  34. La perception monoculaire de la profondeur.B. Bourdon - 1898 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 46:124 - 145.
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  35. Do We Need a Metaphysics for Perception? Some Enactive, Phenomenological Reservations.M. Bower - 2015 - Constructivist Foundations 11 (1):159-161.
    Open peer commentary on the article “Towards a PL-Metaphysics of Perception: In Search of the Metaphysical Roots of Constructivism” by Konrad Werner. Upshot: I disclaim the need for a metaphysics for perception, in the sense of a general metaphysics, and suggest that the motivations for embarking on that project can be satisfied in an interesting way without any general metaphysical stock-taking, by appeal to phenomenological and enactive accounts of perception.
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  36. John McDowell's Mind and World, and Early Romantic Epistemology.Andrew Bowie - 1996 - Revue Internationale de Philosophie 50 (197):515-554.
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  37. Perception and Rational Constraint. [REVIEW]Robert Brandom - 1998 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 58 (2):369-374.
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  38. Review: Perception and Rational Constraint. [REVIEW]Robert Brandom - 1998 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 58 (2):369 - 374.
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  39. Perception of Rotation in Figures with Rectangular and Trapezoidal Features.Myron L. Braunstein - 1971 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 91 (1):25.
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  40. In Perception.Bill Brewer - 2011 - In Johannes Roessler, Hemdat Lerman & Naomi Eilan (eds.), Perception, Causation, and Objectivity. Oxford University Press. pp. 68.
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  41. Review: Précis of Perception and Reason. [REVIEW]Bill Brewer - 2001 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 63 (2):405 - 416.
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  42. Violations of Sensorimotor Theories of Visual Experience.Bruce Bridgeman - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):904-905.
    Although the sensorimotor account is a significant step forward, it cannot explain experiences of entoptic phenomena that violate normal sensorimotor contingencies but nonetheless are perceived as visual. Nervous system structure limits how they can be interpreted. Neurophysiology, combined with a sensorimotor theory, can account for space constancy by denying the existence of permanent representations of states that must be corrected or updated.
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  43. Review of Richard Gaskin, Experience and the World's Own Language: A Critique of John McDowell's Empiricism[REVIEW]Jason Bridges - 2007 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (2).
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  44. Perception and Context: A Contextual Theory of Perception Based Upon Husserl's Theory of Horizons and James's Theory of Fringes.Christopher John Broniak - 1997 - Dissertation, Loyola University of Chicago
    Several classical philosophical theories of perception presuppose that the meaning of a perceptual object is solely its explicit cognitive content. By contrast, Edmund Husserl and William James offer unique frameworks for constructing a far more satisfactory account of perceptual meaning. Husserl provides a theory of perceptual horizons. His theory of horizonal consciousness grew in large measure from the intellectual promptings of William James. In his description of the stream of thought, James introduces the notion of fringes of objects of consciousness. (...)
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  45. Knowledge is Perception.M. F. Burnyeat - 1999 - In Gail Fine (ed.), Plato 1: Metaphysics and Epistemology. Oxford University Press.
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  46. Joseph K. Schear , Mind, Reason, and Being-in-the-World: The McDowell-Dreyfus Debate.Andrew Buskell - 2015 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 14 (2):423-431.
  47. Phenomenology of Perception. [REVIEW]D. C. - 1963 - Review of Metaphysics 16 (4):805-805.
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  48. Seeing Is Believing: Against the Notion of Non-Perceptual Art.Nickolas Calabrese - 2012 - Dialogue 54 (2-3).
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  49. 1. Acquaintance Vs. Knowledge of Truths.John Campbell - manuscript
    Suppose your conscious life were surgically excised, but everything else left intact, what would you miss? In this situation you would not have the slightest idea what was going on. You would have no idea what there is in the world around you; what the grounds are of the potentialities and threats are that you are negotiating. Experience of your surroundings provides you with knowledge of what is there: with your initial base of knowledge of what the things are that (...)
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  50. The Objects of Perception and Belief.Leonard Samuel Carrier - 1967 - Dissertation, Stanford University
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