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  1. Emotion Regulation, Physical Diseases, and Borderline Personality Disorders: Conceptual and Clinical Considerations.Marco Cavicchioli, Lavinia Barone, Donatella Fiore, Monica Marchini, Paola Pazzano, Pietro Ramella, Ilaria Riccardi, Michele Sanza & Cesare Maffei - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    This perspective paper aims at discussing theoretical principles that could explain how emotion regulation and physical diseases mutually influence each other in the context of borderline personality disorder. Furthermore, this paper discusses the clinical implications of the functional relationships between emotion regulation, BPD and medical conditions considering dialectical behavior therapy as a well-validated therapeutic intervention, which encompasses these issues. The inflexible use of maladaptive emotion regulation strategies might directly increase the probability of developing physical diseases through a physiological pathway, or (...)
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  2. Félida, Doubled Personality, and the ‘Normal State’ in Late 19th-Century French Psychology.Kim M. Hajek - 2021 - History of the Human Sciences 34 (2):66-89.
    The case of Félida X and her ‘doubled personality’ served in the last quarter of the 19th century as a proving ground for a distinctively French form of psychology that bore the stamp of physiology, including the comparative term normal state. Debates around Félida’s case provided the occasion for reflection about how that term and its opposites could take their places in the emerging discursive field of psychopathology. This article centres its analysis on Eugène Azam’s 1876–77 study of Félida, and (...)
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  3. Practices of Claiming Control and Independence in Couple Therapy With Narcissism.Bernadetta Janusz, Jörg R. Bergmann, Feliks Matusiak & Anssi Peräkylä - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    Four couple therapy first consultations involving clients with diagnosed narcissistic problems were examined. A sociologically enriched and broadened concept of narcissistic disorder was worked out based on Goffman’s micro-sociology of the self. Conversation analytic methods were used to study in detail episodes in which clients resist to answer a therapist’s question, block or dominate the development of the conversation’s topic, or conspicuously display their interactional independence. These activities are interpreted as a pattern of controlling practices that were prompted by threats (...)
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  4. Computerized Adaptive Testing for Schizotypal Personality Disorder: Detecting Individuals at Risk.Yaling Li, Menghua She, Dongbo Tu & Yan Cai - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    As schizotypal personality disorder increasingly prevails in the general population, a rapid and comprehensive measurement instrument is imperative to screen individuals at risk for SPD. To address this issue, we aimed to develop a computerized adaptive testing for SPD using a non-clinical Chinese sample, consisting of a calibration sample and a validation sample. The item pool of SPD was constructed from several widely used SPD scales and statistical analyses based on the item response theory via a calibration sample using a (...)
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  5. Mentalization and Embodied Selfhood in Borderline Personality Disorder.E. S. Neustadter, A. Fotopoulou, S. K. Fineberg & M. Steinfeld - 2021 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 28 (3-4):126-157.
    Aberrations of self-experience are considered a core feature of borderline personality disorder (BPD). While prominent aetiological accounts of BPD, such as the mentalization-based approach, appeal to the developmental constitution of self in early infant–caregiver environments, they often rely on a conception of self that is not explicitly articulated. Moreover, self-experience in BPD is often theorized at the level of narrative identity, thus minimizing the role of embodied experience. In this article, we present the hypothesis that disordered self and interpersonal functioning (...)
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  6. The Unbearable Dispersal of Being: Narrativity and Personal Identity in Borderline Personality Disorder.Philipp Schmidt & Thomas Fuchs - 2021 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 20 (2):321-340.
    Borderline personality disorder is characterized by severe disturbances in a subject’s sense of identity. Persons with BPD suffer from recurrent feelings of emptiness, a lack of self-feeling, and painful incoherence, especially regarding their own desires, how they see and feel about others, their life goals, or the roles to which they commit themselves. Over the past decade or so, clinical psychologists, psychotherapists, and psychiatrists have turned to philosophical conceptions of selfhood to better understand the borderline-specific ruptures in the sense of (...)
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  7. When the Body Stands in the Way: Complex Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Depersonalization, and Schizophrenia.Yochai Ataria - 2019 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 26 (1):19-31.
    Although not identical, this article suggests that complex posttraumatic stress disorder, depersonalization and schizophrenia share at least one feature: in all these cases, the body becomes a defective tool, an IT. In turn, those suffering from them can no longer be-in-the-world through the living body but rather experience their body as an object; they manage their lives on the level of body image.The next section outlines some cognitive and phenomenological concepts such as body schema, body image, body-as-subject and body-as-object. Thereafter, (...)
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  8. Nurture Before Responsibility: Self-in-Relation Competence and Self-Harm.Camillia Kong - 2019 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 26 (1):1-18.
    Anne was sexually and physically abused as a child and adolescent. Since an adolescent, she has had episodes of engaging in self-injurious behavior, where she repetitively cuts her arms with a knife or scissors, sometimes so seriously that she has had to go to the emergency room. She is relatively high functioning as an individual, where her academic cleverness has enabled her to study for a philosophy degree at a top university. Owing to her history of deliberate self-injury, psychiatrists have (...)
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  9. Clean Hands: Philosophical Lessons From Scrupulosity.Jesse S. Summers & Walter Sinnott-Armstrong - 2019 - Oup Usa.
    People with Scrupulosity have rigorous, obsessive moral beliefs that lead to extreme and compulsive moral acts. These fascinating outliers raise profound questions about human nature, mental illness, moral belief, responsibility, and psychiatric treatment. Clean Hands? Uses a range of case studies to examine this condition and its philosophical implications.
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  10. Personality Disorders and Thick Concepts.Konrad Banicki - 2018 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 25 (3):209-221.
    'Cruel' simply ignores the supposed fact/value dichotomy and cheerfully allows itself to be used sometimes for a normative purpose and sometimes as a descriptive term.Personality disorders have always attracted considerable attention within the philosophy of psychiatry. It was not until two papers written by Louis Charland, however, that they simulated a wider and lively debate. The importance and, at least partly, the strength of Charland's analyses lie in the fact that they are relatively particular and focused in their...
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  11. Il modello medico forte e i disturbi antisociali della personalità (Eng. The strong medical model and antisocial personality disorders)).Zdenka Brzović, Marko Jurjako & Luca Malatesti - 2018 - Sistemi Intelligenti 30 (1):175-188.
    Dominic Murphy in several influential publications has formulated and defended what he calls the strong medical model of mental illness. At the core of this project is the objectivist requirement of classifying mental illness in terms of their aetiologies, preferably characterised by multilevel mechanistic explanations of dysfunctions in neurocomputational processes. We are sympathetic to this project and we devise an argument to support it based on a conception of psychiatric kinds. Murphy has, moreover, maintained that there are some open issues (...)
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  12. Self and Identity in Borderline Personality Disorder: Agency and Mental Time Travel.Natalie Gold & Michalis Kyratsous - 2017 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 23 (5):1020-1028.
  13. Agency in the Absence of Reason-Responsiveness: The Case of Dispositional Impulsivity in Personality Disorders.Gloria Ayob - 2016 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 23 (1):61-73.
    It has recently been argued that persons diagnosed with a personality disorder ought to be held responsible for their actions because these actions are voluntary. Defending this claim, Hannah Pickard contends that exercising choice and control are definitive of voluntary action, and that the behaviors that are constitutive of PD are behaviors over which we have choice and control. Thus PD behaviors are voluntary, and on this basis, their agents can be held properly responsible for this type of behavior. In (...)
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  14. Revisiting Freud and Kohut on Narcissism.Kelso Cratsley - 2016 - Theory & Psychology 26 (3):333-359.
    Narcissism continues to be an important topic of research, with a great deal of ongoing empirical work in social and personality psychology. But there are theoretical issues that have received less attention recently, including those that relate to the foundational theories of the psychoanalytic tradition. As the first step in a larger project of reevaluation, this article offers a critical review of Freud and Heinz Kohut’s theories of narcissism. Centered on a theoretical reconstruction, it clarifies several significant – and often (...)
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  15. Philosophy and Madness. Radical Turns in the Natural Attitude to Life.Wouter Kusters - 2016 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 23 (2):129-146.
    In this article, I examine the relation between philosophy and madness. It is often assumed that madness has to be suppressed, excluded, or conquered before a philosophically sensible text, logical argument, or world of meaning can appear. I argue, instead, that a certain concept of madness, when grafted on phenomenological psychiatry and philosophical mysticism, is intrinsically related to the project of philosophy. With the help of experiences of madness as presented in psychiatry and articulated in mad autobiographical reports, including my (...)
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  16. Philosophy and Psychiatry: Problems, Intersections and New Perspectives.Daniel D. Moseley & Gary Gala - 2016 - Routledge.
    This groundbreaking volume of original essays presents fresh avenues of inquiry at the intersection of philosophy and psychiatry. Contributors draw from a variety of fields, including evolutionary psychiatry, phenomenology, biopsychosocial models, psychoanalysis, neuroscience, neuroethics, behavioral economics, and virtue theory. Philosophy and Psychiatry’s unique structure consists of two parts: in the first, philosophers write five lead essays with replies from psychiatrists. In the second part, this arrangement is reversed. The result is an interdisciplinary exchange that allows for direct discourse, and a (...)
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  17. Borderline Personality Disorder, Discrimination, and Survivors of Chronic Childhood Trauma.Andrea Nicki - 2016 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 9 (1):218-245.
    Many feminist researchers have been critical of the psychiatric category of borderline personality disorder 1 and have emphasized the gendered nature of the diagnosis. It is estimated that people diagnosed with BPD comprise 1 to 2 percent of the general population in the United States in a given year, and that women represent 75 percent of those diagnosed.2 Critics have argued that the diagnosis reinforces double-binds for women and pathologizes traits associated with both conventional femininity, such as emotionality, dependency, and (...)
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  18. Impaired Integration in Psychopathy: A Unified Theory of Psychopathic Dysfunction.Rachel K. B. Hamilton, Kristina Hiatt Racer & Joseph P. Newman - 2015 - Psychological Review 122 (4):770–791.
    This article introduces a novel theoretical framework for psychopathy that bridges dominant affective and cognitive models. According to the proposed impaired integration (II) framework of psychopathic dysfunction, topographical irregularities and abnormalities in neural connectivity in psychopathy hinder the complex process of information integration. Central to the II theory is the notion that psychopathic individuals are “‘wired up’ differently” (Hare, Williamson, & Harpur, 1988, p. 87). Specific theoretical assumptions include decreased functioning of the Salience and Default Mode Networks, normal functioning in (...)
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  19. Immunity and Self-Awareness.Max Seeger - 2015 - Philosophers' Imprint 15.
    Three pathologies of alienation have been claimed to refute the philosophical thesis that introspection-based self-ascriptions of mental states are immune to error through misidentification. In this paper, I show that this critique of the Immunity Thesis is misguided; the cases of alienation either are not self-ascriptions or do not involve misidentification. Rather, these cases undermine a widely assumed explanation of immunity, which is based on the idea that self-ascriptions of mental states are identification-free. I argue that, given a certain understanding (...)
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  20. Rationality, Diagnosis and Patient Autonomy.Jillian Craigie & Lisa Bortolotti - 2014 - Oxford Handbook Psychiatric Ethics.
    In this chapter, our focus is the role played by notions of rationality in the diagnosis of mental disorders, and in the practice of overriding patient autonomy in psychiatry. We describe and evaluate different hypotheses concerning the relationship between rationality and diagnosis, raising questions about what features underpin psychiatric categories. These questions reinforce widely held concerns about the use of diagnosis as a justification for overriding autonomy, which have motivated a shift to mental incapacity as an alternative justification. However, this (...)
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  21. Psychiatry in the Scientific Image.Joel Paris - 2014 - The European Legacy 19 (4):519-520.
  22. Whole Life Narratives and the Self.David Lumsden - 2013 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 20 (1):1-10.
    Narrative theory provides an interesting contribution to the rich philosophical literature on the self and personal identity. This links with psychological and psychiatric themes concerning the self, because many cases of disorder involve some kind of loss or fragmentation of the self. What follows is a philosophical inquiry into these narrative theories, which should have some implications for how we should regard subjects with these disorders. My primary philosophical conclusion is that there is an interesting germ of truth in the (...)
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  23. Moral Disorder In the DSM-IV?: The Cluster B Personality Disorders.Marga Reimer - 2013 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 20 (3):203-215.
  24. The Chasm Within: My Battle With Personality Disorder.Jessica Gray - 2011 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 18 (3):185-190.
    Long before i knew I had a personality disorder, I simply knew that my life felt unbearably difficult to live. For me, life has always been an uphill struggle, and at times I have just let myself tumble down the hill I have strived so hard to climb. Fortunately, I now understand how to keep going, and even to avoid falling down in the first place, but this learning process has taken the entire twenty-eight years of my life, and I (...)
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  25. Responsibility Without Blame: Empathy and the Effective Treatment of Personality Disorder.Hanna Pickard - 2011 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 18 (3):209-224.
  26. Should a Personality Disorder Qualify as a Mental Disease in Insanity Adjudication?Richard J. Bonnie - 2010 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (4):760-763.
    The determinative issue in applying the insanity defense is whether the defendant experienced a legally relevant functional impairment at the time of the offense. Categorical exclusion of personality disorders from the definition of mental disease is clinically and morally arbitrary because it may lead to unfair conviction of a defendant with a personality disorder who actually experienced severe, legally relevant impairments at the time of the crime. There is no need to consider such a drastic approach in most states and (...)
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  27. Proposition: A Personality Disorder May Nullify Responsibility for a Criminal Act.Robert Kinscherff - 2010 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (4):745-759.
    This article argues in support of the proposition that “A Personality Disorder May Nullify Responsibility for a Criminal Act.” Building upon research in categorical and dimensional controversies in diagnosis, neurocognitive science and the behavioral genetics of mental disorders, and difficulties in differential diagnosis and co-morbidity with personality disorders, this article holds that a per se rule barring personality diagnosis as a basis for a defense of legal insanity is scientifically and conceptually indefensible. Rather, focus should be upon the severity and (...)
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  28. Philosophy of Psychiatry.Dominic Murphy - 2010 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  29. Ontological Insecurity: A Guiding Framework for Borderline Personality Disorder.Tina Pietsch, John Wilson & Matthew McDonald - 2010 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 41 (1):85-105.
    The purpose of this inquiry is to explore the experience of Borderline Personality Disorder with the aim of developing a more liberating approach to its diagnosis and treatment. Eight participants diagnosed with Borderline Personality Disorder were recruited from a psychiatric hospital operated by the Surrey and Borders NHS Trust and an outpatient daycentre based in London, United Kingdom. A narrative approach to methodology was employed to collect and analyse the participants’ life-stories. Themes to emerge from the participant’s narratives were found (...)
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  30. Valid Moral Appraisals and Valid Personality Disorders.Peter Zachar & Nancy Nyquist Potter - 2010 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 17 (2):131-142.
    We are thankful for the opportunity to reflect more on the difficult problem of the relationship between moral evaluations and the construct of personality disorders in response to the commentaries by Mike Martin and Louis Charland. We begin by emphasizing to readers that this important problem is complicated by the different perspectives of the various disciplines involved, especially, philosophy, psychiatry, and psychology. Incredulity, anger, and dismay are among the reactions we encountered in discussions of these issues, especially with some mental (...)
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  31. “Personality Disorder” and Capacity to Make Treatment Decisions.G. Szmukler - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (10):647-650.
    Whether treatment decision-making capacity can be meaningfully applied to patients with a diagnosis of “personality disorder” is examined. Patients presenting to a psychiatric emergency clinic with threats of self-harm are considered, two having been assessed and reviewed in detail. It was found that capacity can be meaningfully assessed in such patients, although the process is more complex than in patients with diagnoses of a more conventional kind. The process of assessing capacity in such patients is very time-consuming and may become, (...)
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  32. Psychiatric Comorbidity: More Than a Kuhnian Anomaly.Peter Zachar - 2009 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 16 (1):13-22.
  33. Informed Consent for Research in Borderline Personality Disorder.Rachel E. Dew - 2007 - BMC Medical Ethics 8 (1):1-4.
    Background Previous research on informed consent for research in psychiatric patients has centered on disorders that affect comprehension and appreciation of risks. Little has been written about consent to research in those subjects with Borderline Personality Disorder, a prevalent and disabling condition. Discussion Despite apparently intact cognition and comprehension of risks, a borderline subject may deliberately choose self-harm in order to fulfill abnormal psychological needs, or due to suicidality. Alternatively, such a subject may refuse enrollment due to transference or the (...)
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  34. Self-Injury: Symbolic Sacrifice/Self-Assertion Renders Clinicians Helpless.Christa Kruger - 2003 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 10 (1):17-21.
  35. Blaming Agents and Excusing Persons: The Case of DID.Steve Matthews - 2003 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 10 (2):169-174.
  36. Establishing Personal Identity in Cases of DID.Steve Matthews - 2003 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 10 (2):143-151.
  37. Did You Hurt Yourself?Katherine J. Morris - 2003 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 10 (1):23-24.
  38. Commodity/Body/Sign: Borderline Personality Disorder and the Signification of Self-Injurious Behavior.Nancy Nyquist Potter - 2003 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 10 (1):1-16.
  39. Gender, Body, Meaning: Anthropological Perspectives on Self-Injury and Borderline Personality Disorder.Carolyn Fishel Sargent - 2003 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 10 (1):25-27.
  40. On the Border: Reflections on the Meaning of Self-Injury in Borderline Personality Disorder.Robert L. Woolfolk - 2003 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 10 (1):29-31.
  41. Commentary on" A Discursive Account of Multiple Personality Disorder".Stephen E. Braude - 1997 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 4 (3):223-226.
  42. Multiple Personality and Moral Responsibility.Stephen E. Braude - 1996 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 3 (1):37-54.
  43. Commentary on "Epistemic Value Commitments&Quot.Michael Luntley - 1996 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 3 (3):227-229.
  44. Epistemic Value Commitments in the Debate Over Categorical Vs. Dimensional Personality Diagnosis.John Z. Sadler - 1996 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 3 (3):203-222.
    Contemporary philosophy of science tells us that scientific theories are “underdetermined” by their accompanying data in a variety of ways. Briefly put, theories are not constructed on data alone. Psychiatric classification is subject to this same kind of underdetermination. Theories may be determined by a combination of data, historical factors, practical constraints, value commitments, and other factors. While practical constraints (like user-friendliness or compatibility across diagnostic systems) are commonly admitted to be influential in shaping psychiatric classification, the idea that values (...)
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  45. Commentary on" Puppetmasters and Personality Disorders".Grant Gillett - 1994 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 1 (2):101-103.
  46. Mild Mania and Well-Being.Andrew Moore, Tony Hope & K. W. M. Fulford - 1994 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 1 (3):165-177.
    This paper explores the relationship between mania, or pathologically elevated mood, and philosophical theories of well-being. A patient, Mr. M., is described who oscillated between periods when he refused medication and periods when he was willing to accept it, and whose desires and life objectives were radically different in his medicated and unmedicated states. The practical dilemmas this raised are explored in terms of the three principal philosophical theories of well-being: hedonism, the desire fulfillment theory, and objectivism. None of these (...)
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  47. Commentary on Connectionist Hysteria.James Phillips & J. Melvin Woody - 1994 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 1 (2):89-90.
  48. Diagnosing Blame: Responsibility and the Psychopath.Carl Elliott - 1992 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 17 (2):199-214.
    The diagnosis of psychopathy is controversial largely because of two notions: first, that because of their defects, psychopaths cannot understand morality, and second, that these defects should thus excuse psychopaths from moral responsibility for their actions. However, it is not clear just what is involved in understanding morality. The argument that the psychopath is ignorant of morality in the same way that one might be ignorant of facts is difficult to sustain. However, a closer examination of the psychopath's peculiar deficiencies (...)
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  49. The Diseases of Personality.Th Ribot - 1894 - Philosophical Review 3:763.
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  50. Oxford Centre for Neuroethics.Hanna Pickard - unknown
    Effective treatment of personality disorder (PD) presents a clinical conundrum. Many of the behaviours constitutive of PD cause harm to self and others. Encouraging service users to take responsibility for this behaviour is central to treatment. Blame, in contrast, is detrimental. How is it possible to hold service users responsible for harm to self and others without blaming them? A solution to this problem is part conceptual, part practical. I offer a conceptual framework that clearly distinguishes between ideas of responsibility, (...)
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