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  1. Understanding Universals in Abelard's Tractatus de Intellectibus: The Notion of "Nature".Roxane Noël - 2018 - Dissertation, University of Alberta
    This thesis focuses on Abelard’s solution to the problem of understanding universals as presented in the Tractatus de Intellectibus. He examines this issue by asking what is understood when we consider the term ‘man’, a problem I call the ‘homo intelligitur [man is understood]’ problem. This is an important question, since earlier in the Treatise, Abelard states that understandings paying attention [attendens] to things otherwise than they are are empty, and thus, cannot be true. The challenge is therefore to explain (...)
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  2. Abelard in Four Dimensions: A Twelfth-Century Philosopher in His Context and Ours. By Jon Marenbon. [REVIEW]Giuseppe Butera - 2017 - International Philosophical Quarterly 57 (1):110-112.
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  3. Intencionalidade, Consciência e Caridade nas obras Éticas de Pedro Abelardo.Pedro Rodolfo Fernandes da Silva - 2017 - Dissertation, UFSCAR, Brazil
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  4. The Repentant Abelard: Family, Gender, and Ethics in Peter Abelard’s Carmen Ad Astralabium and Planctus. [REVIEW]Glenn W. Olsen - 2017 - The European Legacy 22 (3):371-372.
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  5. Deux styles de vie et de pensée dans la première moitié du XIIe siècle : Pierre Abélard et Hugues de Saint-Victor.Dominique Poirel - 2016 - Bulletin de Philosophie Medievale 58:3-22.
    It would be easy to oppose Peter Abelard and Hugh of Saint-Victor as two opposed types of masters: on one side the “intellectual,” in almost the modern sense of the word, and on the other side, a representative of the humanist, clerical and monastic tradition, soon to be effaced. In order to highlight the real significance of their divergences and the profound coherence of both historical and intellectual personalities, in this article the author investigated their social origins, how each one (...)
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  6. Book Review: Abelard in Four Dimensions: A Twelfth-Century Philosopher in His Context and Ours, Written by John Marenbon. [REVIEW]Andrew Arlig - 2015 - Vivarium 53 (1):114-116.
  7. The Logic of Dead Humans: Abelard and the Transformation of the Porphyrian Tree.Margaret Cameron - 2015 - Oxford Studies in Medieval Philosophy 3 (1):32-63.
    Interest in philosophical anthropology in the early twelfth century was limited to the logical question of how to think and speak about dead humans. This question was prompted by the logic of living and dead humans based on the doctrine of substance found in Aristotle’s Categories and in the division of substance, as outlined by Porphyry to exemplify the logic of genus and species relations in the Isagoge. Abelard held the view that there is no such thing as a dead (...)
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  8. Instance Is the Converse of Aspect.Boris Hennig - 2015 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 93 (1):3-20.
    According to the aspect theory of instantiation, a particular A instantiates a universal B if and only if an aspect of A is cross-count identical with an aspect of B. This involves the assumption that both particulars and universals have aspects, and that aspects can mediate between different ways of counting things. I will ask what is new about this account of instantiation and, more importantly, whether it is an improvement on its older relatives. It will turn out that the (...)
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  9. Abelard in Four Dimensions: A Twelfth-Century Philosopher in His Context and Ours by John Marenbon. [REVIEW]Eileen C. Sweeney - 2015 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 53 (3):547-548.
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  10. Happiness, Contemplative Life, and the Tria Genera Hominum in Twelfth-Century Philosophy: Peter Abelard and John of Salisbury.Luisa Valente - 2015 - Quaestio 15:73-98.
    As Christians, all twelfth-century Latin thinkers identified true happiness with the happiness God promises in the afterlife. This happiness was believed to be entirely spiritual, consisting in the endless vision of God. Nevertheless, along with this beatitudo in patria we also find in some twelfth-century authors the idea of a beatitudo in via as the philosophical life. This life can be characterized either as completely contemplative and solitary, or as one that remains partially attached to material circumstances and action in (...)
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  11. Aliquid Amplius Audire Desiderat: Desire in Abelard’s Theory of Incomplete and Non-Assertive Complete Sentences.Luisa Valente - 2015 - Vivarium 53 (2-4):221-248.
    _ Source: _Volume 53, Issue 2-4, pp 221 - 248 One of the peculiarities of Peter Abelard’s analysis of incomplete and non-assertive sentences is his use of the notion of desire: in both _Dialectica_ and _Glosses on Peri hermeneias_ the terms _desiderium_ and _desidero_ move to the foreground side by side with _optatio, expectatio, suspensio_ and the related verbs. Desire plays a structural role in Abelard’s descriptions of the compositional way in which the linguistic message is received, changing step by (...)
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  12. John Marenbon, The Oxford Handbook of Medieval Philosophy. [REVIEW]Stephen Boulter - 2014 - Philosophy in Review 34 (5):246-250.
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  13. John Marenbon, Abelard in Four Dimensions: A Twelfth-Century Philosopher in His Context and Ours. [REVIEW]Jacob Held - 2014 - Philosophy in Review 34 (5):243-245.
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  14. Abelard and the Jews.Eileen C. Sweeney - 2014 - In Babette S. Hellemans & E. J. Brill (eds.), Rethinking Abelard: A Collection of Critical Essays. pp. 37-50.
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  15. Rethinking Twelfth Century Ethics: The Contribution of Heloise.Sandrine Berges - 2013 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (4):667-687.
    Twelfth-century ethics is commonly thought of as following a stoic influence rather than an Aristotelian one. It is also assumed that these two schools are widely different, in particular with regards to the social aspect of the virtuous life. In this paper I argue that this picture is misleading and that Heloise of Argenteuil recognized that stoic ethics did not entail isolation but could be played out in a social context. I argue that her philosophical contribution does not end there, (...)
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  16. Sic et non, czyli Abelarda wywody sproblematyzowane.Anna Jaroszewska - 2013 - Filo-Sofija 13 (20).
    Anna Jaroszewska Sic et Non – Pierre Abelard’s Problematic Reasoning. Pierre Abelard, the philosopher called by many “the bee,” aroused much controversy because of his views. He was the most famous dialectician of his time. He used his logical and rational methods of truth investigation in the field of philosophy and theology. His thesis aroused much opposition, as evidenced by the double condemnation of the thinker by synods and his actions, intended to strengthen the role and independence of philosophy, were (...)
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  17. Abelard in Four Dimensions: A Twelfth-Century Philosopher in His Context and Ours.John Marenbon - 2013 - University of Notre Dame Press.
    _Abelard in Four Dimensions: A Twelfth-Century Philosopher in His Context and Ours_ by John Marenbon, one of the leading scholars of medieval philosophy and a specialist on Abelard's thought, originated from a set of lectures in the distinguished Conway Lectures in Medieval Studies series and provides new interpretations of central areas of Peter Abelard's philosophy and its influence. The four dimensions of Abelard to which the title refers are that of the past, present, future, and the present-day philosophical culture in (...)
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  18. Abelard: Inter-Religious Dialogue Rendered Philosophically.Martin Vasek - 2013 - Filozofia 68 (6):481-492.
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  19. Peter Abelard on Material Constitution.Andrew Arlig - 2012 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 94 (2):119-146.
  20. Abélard et les universaux : édition et traduction du début de la Logica « Ingredientibus » : Super Porphyrium.Claude Lafleur & Joanne Carrier - 2012 - Laval Théologique et Philosophique 68 (1):129-210.
    Résumé Appuyée sur une collation systématique — incluant l’orthographe — de l’unique manuscrit subsistant, cette nouvelle édition critique du début de la Logica « Ingredientibus » : Super Porphyrium, accompagnée d’une traduction française inédite et complétée par une abondante annotation, rend ainsi accessible l’exposé le plus détaillé d’Abélard sur les universaux, des pages célèbres où, dans une approche sémantique non exempte de perspectives métaphysiques, on trouve, comme l’étude précédente l’a laissé voir, des développements philosophiques importants relatifs à l’intellection et à (...)
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  21. Triple signification des noms universels, intellection et abstraction dans la Logica « Ingredientibus » : Super Porphyrium d’Abélard.Claude Lafleur & Joanne Carrier - 2012 - Laval Théologique et Philosophique 68 (1):91-128.
    Résumé Étude préliminaire à la nouvelle édition critique et à la traduction inédite offertes, dans ce numéro thématique, du début de la Logica « Ingredientibus » : Super Porphyrium d’Abélard, cet article opère d’abord un survol d’ensemble du texte, avec insistance sur l’exposé relatif aux universaux, et approfondit ensuite trois points de doctrine difficiles, sur lesquels l’historiographie récente a parfois hésité ou buté : la troisième signification des noms universels ; la conception prisciano-platonicienne de la pensée divine ; l’univocité de (...)
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  22. Logic, Theology, and Poetry in Boethius, Abelard, and Alain of Lille: Words in the Absence of Things. By Eileen C. Sweeney. [REVIEW]Giorgio Pini - 2012 - International Philosophical Quarterly 52 (2):252-254.
  23. Indiferencia, Ambivalencia y Tipos de Consentimiento: Agustín En El Scito Te Ipsum de Abelardo.Manfred Svensson - 2012 - Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 53 (125):103-118.
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  24. An Exposition on the Six-Day Work.Peter Abelard - 2011 - Brepols Publishers.
    Translated by Wanda Zemler-Cizewski. Peter Abelard's "Expositio in Hexaemeron", or interpretation of the "Six-Day Work of Creation", was commissioned by Heloise for the community of the Paraclete. The work is unusual in that it gives priority to the historical over the allegorical sense, and bears strong affinities to the writings of Thierry of Chartres and other Twelfth century students of the natural sciences. As such, it is evidence both for the general state of Twelfth century knowledge of cosmology, and for (...)
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  25. Heloise: A Christian View on Ethics and Love.Jane Duran - 2011 - New Blackfriars 92 (1037):35-45.
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  26. “What An Ugly Child”: Abaelard on Translation, Figurative Language, and Logic.Christopher J. Martin - 2011 - Vivarium 49 (1-3):26-49.
    An examination the development of Peter Abaelard's views on translation and figurative meaning. Mediaeval philosophers curiously do not connect the theory of translation implied by Aristotelian semantics with the multiplicity of tongues consequent upon the fall of Babel and do not seem to have much to offer to help in solving the problems of scriptural interpretation noted by Augustine. Indeed, on the Aristotelian account of meaning such problems do not arise. This paper shows that Abaelard is like others in this (...)
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  27. Heloise.Constant J. Mews - 2011 - In H. Lagerlund (ed.), Encyclopedia of Medieval Philosophy. Springer. pp. 456-458.
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  28. Paradoxes of Conscience in the High Middle Ages: Abelard, Heloise and the Archpoet. [REVIEW]Juanita Ruys - 2011 - The Medieval Review 11.
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  29. Abelard on Status and Their Relation to Universals. A Husserlian Interpretation.Mark K. Spencer - 2011 - International Philosophical Quarterly 51 (2):223-240.
    The discussion of universals in Peter Abelard’s Logica ‘Ingredientibus’ has been interpreted in many ways. Of particular controversy has been the proper way to interpret his use of the term status. In this paper I offer an interpretation of status by comparing Abelard’s account of knowledge of universals to Edmund Husserl’s presentations of categorial and eidetic intuition. I argue that status is meant to be understood as something like an ideal object, in Husserl’s sense of the term. First, I present (...)
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  30. As fontes Aristotélicas e Estóicas em Abelardo: a noção de 'consentimento'.Guy Hamelin - 2010 - Veritas – Revista de Filosofia da Pucrs 55 (2).
    Peter Abelard’s (1079-1142) conception of moral sin contains a fundamental element from Stoicism, which is the notion of “consent” (consensus). After the presentation of the essentials of that Abelardian theory, we return to the source of that same idea in ancient and imperial Stoicism. According to their main representatives, “consent” or “assent” (sugkata/qesij) has a determining function not only in ethics, but also in the process of knowledge as well. We emphasize in passing the resemblance between some important components of (...)
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  31. Medieval Commentators on Future Contingents in De Interpretatione 9.Simo Knuuttila - 2010 - Vivarium 48 (1):75-95.
    This article considers three medieval approaches to the problem of future contingent propositions in chapter 9 of Aristotle's _De interpretatione_. While Boethius assumed that God's atemporal knowledge infallibly pertains to historical events, he was inclined to believe that Aristotle correctly taught that future contingent propositions are not antecedently true or false, even though they may be characterized as true-or-false. Aquinas also tried to combine the allegedly Aristotelian view of the disjunctive truth-value of future contingent propositions with the conception of all (...)
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  32. Peter Abelard’s Metaphysics of the Incarnation.Anna Marmodoro & Jonathan Hill - 2010 - Philosophy and Theology 22 (1/2):27-48.
    In this paper, we examine Abelard’s model of the incarnation and place it within the wider context of his views in metaphysics and logic. In particular, we consider whether Abelard has the resources to solve the major difficulties faced by the so-called “compositional models” of the incarnation, such as his own. These difficulties include: the requirement to account for Christ’s unity as a single person, despite being composed of two concrete particulars; the requirement to allow that Christ is identical with (...)
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  33. Yes and No: The Complete English Translation of Peter Abelard's Sic Et Non. [REVIEW]Constant Mews - 2010 - The Medieval Review 6.
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  34. The Proportion of His Purpose : Peter Abelard's Historia Calamitatum as Sacred History.Chad Schrock - 2010 - Archives d'Histoire Doctrinale et Littéraire du Moyen Âge 77 (1):29-46.
    Le récit de l’Historia calamitatum dépend, au niveau thématique, d’une proportion logique que Pierre Abélard annonce au commencement de son épître de consolation. Abélard suggère que la souffrance ressentie par le lecteur de son Historia est en rapport avec la souffrance d’Abélard, tout comme la souffrance d’Abélard est en rapport avec la souffrance du Christ et des pères de l’Église. La distance entre chaque terme de cette proportion mesure en effet la consolation disponible au souffrant.
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  35. The Role of Reason in Morality: The Case of Abelard’s Ethics.Jimmy Washburn - 2010 - Ideas Y Valores 59 (143):73-108.
    Peter Abelard develops an ethical thought, which is quite different from later moral philosophy, structured over some concepts such as reason and moral subjectivity. The first, is understood as discursive power over moral life and as moral reasoning. About moral subjectivity, emphasizes the moral act’s psychology, and develop his understanding not on the basis of sin, but its constitution. The paper traces the development of these two concepts in Abelard’s two major ethical works: Ethics and Dialogue between a Philosopher, a (...)
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  36. Letters of Peter Abelard, Beyond the Personal. Peter Abelard, Jan M. Ziolkowski. [REVIEW]Michael T. Clanchy - 2009 - Speculum 84 (3):662-663.
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  37. Paradoxes of Conscience in the High Middle Ages: Abelard, Heloise, and the Archpoet.Peter Godman - 2009 - Cambridge University Press.
    Moral moments -- The neurotic and the penitent -- True, false, and feigned penance -- Fame without conscience -- Cain and conscience -- Feminine paradoxes -- Sincere hypocrisy -- The poetical consience -- Envoi : spiritual sophistry.
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  38. The Status of Status: Boethian Realism in Abelard.Joel M. Potter - 2009 - Carmina Philosophiae 18:127-135.
    Peter Abelard's claim that universals are only words is well known, yet its metaphysical bearing for Abelard's philosophy is much disputed. Peter King has recently suggested that Abelard's nominalism is only an element of his larger irrealist metaphysic. Against this interpretation, I argue that Abelard's view is better understood as a form of moderate realism and a development of the solution attempted by Boethius in his Second Commentary on Porphyry's Isagoge. Both Abelard and Boethius clearly deny the independent existence of (...)
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  39. Thomas J. Bell, Peter Abelard After Marriage: The Spiritual Direction of Heloise and Her Nuns Through Liturgical Song. Kalamazoo, Mich.: Cistercian Publications, Western Michigan University, 2007. Paper. Pp. Xxxvii, 346; Tables, 1 Diagram, and Musical Examples. $39.95. [REVIEW]Julia W. Shinnick - 2009 - Speculum 84 (2):396-397.
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  40. Medieval Philosophy: An Historical and Philosophical Introduction - by John Marenbon. [REVIEW]Gerard Casey - 2008 - Philosophical Books 49 (3):251-253.
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  41. Peter Abelard.Peter King - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Peter Abelard (1079 – 21 April 1142) [‘Abailard’ or ‘Abaelard’ or ‘Habalaarz’ and so on] was the pre-eminent philosopher and theologian of the twelfth century. The teacher of his generation, he was also famous as a poet and a musician. Prior to the recovery of Aristotle, he brought the native Latin tradition in philosophy to its highest pitch. His genius was evident in all he did. He is, arguably, the greatest logician of the Middle Ages and is equally famous as (...)
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  42. Abelard on «Differentiae»: How Consistent is His Nominalism?John Marenbon - 2008 - Documenti E Studi Sulla Tradizione Filosofica Medievale 19:179-190.
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  43. Letters of Peter Abelard: Beyond the Personal. [REVIEW]Constant Mews - 2008 - The Medieval Review 10.
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  44. Abelard and Heloise: The Letters and Other Writings. [REVIEW]Carol Symes - 2008 - The Medieval Review 11.
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  45. Abelard’s Assault on Everyday Objects.Andrew Arlig - 2007 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 81 (2):209-227.
    Abelard repeatedly claims that no thing can survive the gain or loss of parts. I outline Abelard’s reasons for holding this controversial position. First, a change of parts compromises the matter of the object. Secondly, a change in matter compromises the form of the object. Given that both elements of an object are compromised by any gain or loss of a part, the object itself is compromised by any such change. An object that appears to survive change is really a (...)
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  46. Special Issue of ACPQ on Peter Abelard.Jeffrey E. Brower - 2007 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 81 (2).
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  47. Abelard (and Heloise?) On Intention.Margaret Cameron - 2007 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 81 (2):323-338.
    For Abelard, the notion of “intention” (intentio, attentio) plays a central and important role in his cognitive and ethical theories. Is there any philosophical connection between its uses in these contexts? In recent publications, Constant Mews has argued that the cognitive and ethical senses of “intention” are related (namely, the cognitive sense evolves into the ethical sense), and that Abelard is repeatedly led to focus on intentions throughout his career due to the influence of Heloise. Here I evaluate Mews’s arguments (...)
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  48. Constant J. Mews, Abelard and Heloise. (Great Medieval Thinkers.) Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2005. Pp. Xviii, 308. [REVIEW]Margaret Cameron - 2007 - Speculum 82 (1):214-215.
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  49. “The Law Was Given for the Sake of Life”: Peter Abelard on the Law of Moses.Sean Eisen Murphy - 2007 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 81 (2):271-306.
    Abelard’s most famous spokesman for the ancient and abiding moral and religious worth of the Law of Moses is probably the character of the Jew, invented for one of two fictional dialogues in the Collationes. The equally fictive Philosopher, a rationalist theist who gets the last word in his exchange with the Jew, condemns the Law as a useless addition to the natural law, a threat to genuine morality with a highly dubious claim to divine origin. The Philosopher’s condemnation, however, (...)
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  50. “In Accordance with the Law”: Reconciling Divine and Civil Law in Abelard.Amber L. Griffioen - 2007 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 81 (2):307-321.
    In the "Ethics", Abelard discusses the example of a judge who knowingly convicts an innocent defendant. He claims that this judge does rightly when he punishes the innocent man to the full extent of the law. Yet this claim seems counterintuitive, and, at first glance, contrary to Abelard’s own ethical system. Nevertheless, I argue that Abelard’s ethical system cannot be viewed as completely subjective, since the rightness of an individual act of consent is grounded in objective standards established by God. (...)
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