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112 found
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  1. Toward a self-correcting society: Deep reflective thinking as a theory of practice.Elizabeth Fynes-Clinton, Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton - 2024 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 11 (1):63–82.
    This paper addresses the question of how to educate toward democracy, which has as its defining trait the ability to self-correct. We draw on a study that investigated Deep Reflective Thinking (DRT) as a classroom method for cultivating collective doubt, which is essential for developing students’ capacity for self-correction in a community of inquiry.
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  2. Cafe Conversations: Participatory Philosophy in Public Spaces.Michael Picard (ed.) - 2024 - Oakville, Ontario, Canada: Rocks' Mills Press. Translated by Michael Picard.
    This collection of essays is the first to look closely at the phenomena of philosophy in a cafe. Since the tradition of philosophical dialogue in coffee-houses was revived in Paris in the 1990s, public venues for participatory philosophy have sprung up in numerous countries, taking many forms, all seeking to stimulate intellectual interest as well as meaningful democratic community engagement. Some of the earliest discussion series continue to this day. The simple activity of reasoning together in a cafe is of (...)
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  3. Place, empire, environmental education and the community of inquiry.Simone Thornton, Gilbert Burgh & Mary Graham - 2024 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 11 (1):83–103.
    Place-based education is founded on the idea that the student’s local community is one of their primary learning resources. Place-based education’s underlying educational principle is that students need to first have an experiential understanding of the history, culture, and ecology of the environment in which they are situated before tackling broader national and global issues. Such attempts are a step in the right direction in dealing with controversial issues in a democracy by providing resources for synthesising curriculum though theory (curriculum (...)
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  4. Filosofía Lúdica: Pensar jugando desde el cuerpo en movimiento (8th edition).Cristina Toti - 2024 - Revista Pensar Juntos 8:1-17.
    El artículo tiene como objetivo explorar el papel del juego y del enfoque lúdico dentro de la Filosofía Lúdica (Filú), un movimiento educativo arraigado en la Filosofía para Niños y Niñas (FpN). Desde la perspectiva de un aprendiz, se subraya que, en la evolución de Filú, el juego no se considera simplemente un componente adicional, sino un pilar esencial, especialmente cuando lo lúdico se integra de manera crucial en el proceso de aprendizaje junto al cuerpo. La dimensión lúdica abarca diversos (...)
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  5. Doing Philosophy: Beyond Books and Classrooms.Kaz Bland & Rob Wilson - 2023 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 10 (2):47-64.
    Philosophy in community projects provide powerful, immersive introductions to philosophical thinking for both children and tertiary students. Such introductions can jumpstart transformative learning as well as diversify who seeks out philosophy in the longer term, both in schools and in universities. Using survey responses from teachers, parents, participants, staff, and volunteers of two such programs – Eurekamp Oz! and philosothons – we show how participants find value in engaging in communities of inquiry and philosophical thinking more broadly. We argue correspondingly (...)
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  6. Responding to climate change ‘controversy’ in schools: Philosophy for Children, place-responsive pedagogies & Critical Indigenous Pedagogy.Jennifer Bleazby, Simone Thornton, Gilbert Burgh & Mary Graham - 2023 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 55 (10):1096–1108.
    Despite the scientific consensus, climate change continues to be socially and politically controversial. Consequently, teachers may worry about accusations of political indoctrination if they teach climate change in their classrooms. Research shows that many teachers are using the ‘teaching the controversy’ approach to teach climate change, essentially allowing students to make up their own mind about climate change. Drawing on some philosophical literature about indoctrination and controversial issues, we argue that such an approach is inappropriate and, given the escalating crisis (...)
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  7. Autistic Students within the Community of Inquiry.Rylan Garwood - 2023 - Stance 16 (1):50-61.
    The standard pedagogy within Philosophy for Children courses is the community of inquiry. In this paper, I argue that the current form of the community of inquiry does not properly accommodate autistic students. Using observations from Benjamin Lukey alongside my personal testimony, I illustrate how autistic students may struggle within the community of inquiry. Importantly, I argue that this need not be the case, as the community of inquiry can be made more inclusive if it were to emphasize collaboration instead (...)
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  8. Deliberative Facilitation in the Classroom: The Interplay of Facilitative Technique and Design to Make Space for Democracy.Nishiyama Kei, Russell A. Wendy, Pierrick Chalaye & Greenwell Tom - 2023 - Democracy and Education 31 (1):1-11.
    Widespread global interest and adoption of deliberative democracy approaches to reinvigorate citi- zenship and policymaking in an era of democratic crisis/decline has been mirrored by increasing interest in deliberation in schools, both as an approach to pedagogy and student empowerment and as a training ground for deliberative citizenship. In school deliberation, as in other settings, a key and sometimes neglected element of high-quality deliberation is facilitation. Facilitation can help to establish and maintain deliberative norms, assist participants to deliberate productively, and (...)
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  9. Pianificare sessioni P4C attraverso le abilità di pensiero. EN_ Planning P4C Sessions Focusing on Thinking Skills.Cristina Toti - 2023 - Indagine e Pratica Filosofica. En_Philosophical Inquiry and Practice 1:19-40.
    The paper addresses the methodology used by the teacher-KEYWORDS: facilitator to plan P4C sessions. The classic method consists of identifying the guidelines of the dialogue from a provisional mapping of the text, but this can be supplemented or replaced by other tools‡. GrupIREF and the Filosofía Lúdica movement§ use an approach that focuses on thinking skills. The P4C session is planned from the choice of the thinking skills to be trained - or possibly the attitudes and ethical values that appear (...)
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  10. Philosophical Problems in the Classroom. The Clash Strategy for Planning and Facilitating Dialogic Inquiry.Luca Zanetti - 2023 - Metodo. International Studies in Phenomenology and Philosophy 11 (1):321-351.
    The aim of this paper is to clarify under what conditions a philosophical problem arises. I will describe two ways in which we might perceive a question as a problem. First, when we fnd ourselves inclined to believe in propositions that appear incompatible with each other. Second, when we fnd ourselves inclined to believe in propositions that seem incompatible with our desires. I will discuss both of these cases and articulate a didactic strategy – the Clash Strategy – which can (...)
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  11. Philosothons: Rewarding collaborative thinking.Danielle Diver - 2022 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 9 (1):28-46.
    Competition, and its effect on educational environments, has been widely debated. On the one hand, it is argued that competition raises attainment and, on the other, it is said that whilst it may raise attainment for some, it exists at the expense of a supportive school environment. Should philosophy undertaken as a subject in schools, such as P4C, involve any level of competition if there is a chance of it raising performance? Scholars have argued that communities of inquiry within P4C (...)
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  12. What about place? Education, identity and ecological justice.Mary Graham, Simone Thornton & Gilbert Burgh - 2022 - Educators Learning Through Communities of Philosophical Enquiry [Special Issue]. BERA Blog (21 September).
    Special issue of the BERA Blog: 'Educators learning through communities of philosophical enquiry', edited by Joanna Haynes. In this blog post, we focus on the need for converting classrooms into place-responsive communities of inquiry that are essential to developing eco-citizen identities – identities that break with socially and environmentally harmful knowledge and habits.
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  13. The Philosothon: Philosophy as performance.Simon Kidd - 2022 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 9 (2):41-77.
    This paper addresses the question of the place for competition in philosophy by considering the example of the Philosothon, a popular school-based philosophy competition originating in Western Australia. Criticisms of this competition typically focus either on specific procedural problems, or else on the claim that the competitive spirit is inimical to collaborative philosophical inquiry. The former type of criticism is extrinsic to competitive philosophy per se, while the latter is intrinsic to it. Defenders of the Philosothon dismiss both types of (...)
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  14. Competition in philosophy is a feminist issue.Ben Kilby - 2022 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 9 (2):90-113.
    The role of competition in philosophy is not just a pedagogical concern, but also a feminist concern. Competitive philosophy in schools is intrinsically linked to Janice Moulton’s feminist critique of academic philosophy referred to as ‘The Adversary Method’. She argues that dialogue that emphasises adversarial methods of argumentation promote dominant notions of masculinity. Many philosophers and educators argue that this traditional ideal of masculinity and the adversarial mode of communicating are problematic for a variety of reasons. There has also been (...)
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  15. Deliberating Across the Lifespan.Vazquez Michael - 2022 - In Roberta Israeloff & Karen Mizell (eds.), The Ethics Bowl Way: Answering Questions, Questioning Answers, and Creating Ethical Communities. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. pp. 91-100.
    In this chapter I articulate philosophical and pedagogical motivations for introducing Ethics Bowl to adults, followed by practical strategies for implementation. Ethics Bowl is an opportunity for individuals to engage in ethical reflection for themselves, and to thereby have greater ownership over their habits, beliefs, values, and life projects. As a deliberative pedagogy, it is also an opportunity for individuals to cultivate democratic skills and dispositions that will in turn permeate the civic sphere, the workplace, and other domains of shared (...)
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  16. The Community of Philosophical Inquiry as a place of agon: Exploring children’s experiences of competitiveness in philosophical dialogue.Baptiste Roucau - 2022 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 9 (1):84-113.
    This paper explores an important yet overlooked aspect of Philosophy for Children : how children experience competitiveness in the Community of Philosophical Inquiry. It describes a qualitative case study conducted with 76 young people involved in CPI dialogues in formal and informal educational settings in Canada and New Zealand. Interviews and video observation revealed that participants often experienced dialogues as competitive exchanges in which ‘winning’ consisted of convincing others, while giving in to others’ opinions was associated with defeat and disappointment. (...)
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  17. P4C as Microcosm of Civil Society.Senem Saner - 2022 - Precollege Philosophy and Public Practice 4:69-90.
    Philosophy for Children (P4C) practice and its distinctive method of cultivating communities of philosophical inquiry model two main functions of democratic civil society. Civil society makes explicit the implicit agreement of communal membership and common belonging and mediates the diverse interests and values of community members. An essential principle of civil society that underlies these two functions is that its members possess intrinsic and political equality, fostering a unique space for civic engagement and democratic will-formation. P4C programs enact these functions (...)
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  18. Cooperation and competition in the Philosothon.Alan Tapper & Matthew Wills - 2022 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 9 (2):78-89.
    Philosothons are events in which students practise Community of Philosophical Inquiry, usually with awards being made using three criteria: critical thinking, creative thinking and collaboration. This seems to generate a tension. On the one hand it recognises collaboration as a valued trait; on the other hand, the element of competition may seem antithetical to collaboration. There are various possible considerations relevant to this apparent problem. We can pose them as seven questions. One, do the awards really recognise the best performers? (...)
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  19. Rethinking teacher preparation for teaching controversial topics in a community of inquiry.Simone Thornton, Gilbert Burgh, Jennifer Bleazby & Mary Graham - 2022 - In Arie Kizel (ed.), Philosophy with children and teacher education: Global perspectives on critical, creative and caring thinking. Routledge. pp. 194-203.
    Contemporary socio-political issues often seen as socially controversial and highly politicised topics, such as anthropogenic climate change, public scepticism over preventive public health measures during pandemics such as COVID-19, and Indigenous sovereignty, lands rights, and ways of knowing, being and doing, highlight the need for education to address such issues more effectively. Controversial issues do not exist in isolation. They are connected to questions of order, interpretation, meaning-making, ethics, and why and how we live, i.e., to philosophical questions. We argue (...)
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  20. How Parrhesia in Doing Philosophy with Children Develops Their Touchstones of Reality, Russian translation.Maria daVenza Tillmanns - 2022 - Социум И Власть 94 (4):58-66.
    Translation into Russian by Dr. Sergey Borisov -/- Аннотация Понятие «парресия» впервые появляется в греческой литературе в V в. до н. э. Парресия — это возможность говорить свободно и открыто, не считаясь с авторитетами, говорить то, что без этого права может привести к наказанию или смерти. Парресия позволяла говорить правду властям, принося пользу тому, кто властвует, кому зачастую не хватает понимания сути реального положения дел. -/- Перевод статьи выполнен С. В. Борисовым по изданию: Tillmanns, Maria daVenza (2022). “How Parrhesia in (...)
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  21. The narrow-sense and wide-sense community of inquiry: What it means for teachers.Gilbert Burgh - 2021 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 41 (1):12-26.
    In this paper, I introduce the narrow-sense and wide-sense conceptions of the community of inquiry (Sprod, 2001) as a way of understanding what is meant by the phrase ‘converting the classroom into a community of inquiry.’ The wide-sense conception is the organising or regulative principle of scholarly communities of inquiry and a classroom-wide ideal for the reconstruction of education. I argue that converting the classroom into a community of inquiry requires more than following a specific procedural method, and, therefore, that (...)
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  22. Teaching democracy in an age of uncertainty: Place-responsive learning.Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton - 2021 - Abingdon, UK: Routledge.
    The strength of democracy lies in its ability to self-correct, to solve problems and adapt to new challenges. However, increased volatility, resulting from multiple crises on multiple fronts – humanitarian, financial, and environmental – is testing this ability. By offering a new framework for democratic education, Teaching Democracy in an Age of Uncertainty begins a dialogue with education professionals towards the reconstruction of education and by extension our social, cultural and political institutions. -/- This book is the first monograph on (...)
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  23. Is That a Philosophical Question? The Philosopher as Teacher.Karen S. Emmerman - 2021 - Metaphilosophy 52 (2):302-320.
    In Philosophy for Children (P4C) theory there is a long‐standing commitment to democratizing the classroom. It is widely believed that to properly democratize the classroom question‐asking and question selection should be undertaken by the students rather than the adult facilitator. In practice, this commitment to democratization generates a tension. Asking and identifying philosophical questions is an acquired skill. For P4C practitioners, it is difficult to find a balance between the desire to democratize the classroom through a student‐centered P4C practice and (...)
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  24. Philosophy for Children and Children’s Philosophical Thinking.Maughn Gregory - 2021 - In Anna Pagès (ed.), A History of Western Philosophy of Education in the Contemporary Landscape. Bloomsbury. pp. 153-177.
    Since the late 1960s, philosophy for children has become a global, multi-disciplinary movement involving innovations in curriculum, pedagogy, educational theory, and teacher education; in moral, social and political philosophy; and in discourse and literary theory. And it has generated the new academic field of philosophy of childhood. Gareth B. Matthews (1929-2011) traced contemporary disrespect for children to Aristotle, for whom the child is essentially a pre-intellectual and pre-moral precursor to the fully realized human adult. Matthews Matthews dubbed this the “deficit (...)
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  25. P4C & Community-Engaged Pedagogy.Erik Kenyon - 2021 - In Stephen Kekoa Miller (ed.), Intentional Disruption: Expanding Access to Philosophy. Wilmington, Delaware: Vernon Press. pp. 35-48.
  26. A Seminar on Philosophy for/with Children as a Dialogical Space between Jews and Arabs at the University of Haifa.Arie Kizel - 2021 - In International Association for Teachers of Philosophy at Schools and Universities Yearbook. Zürich: pp. 176-184.
    In recent years, the educational-system development specialization of the MA program in the University of Haifa’s Faculty of Education has held an annual seminar on Philosophy for/with Children (P4wC). Under my guidance, Jewish, Muslim, Christian, Druze, and Circassian students have formed a group embodying a living and breathing dialogical space. Despite the global spread of P4wC principles following the emergence of the P4C movement promoted by the International Council of Philosophical Inquiry and its practice in dozens of national and regional (...)
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  27. International Association for Teachers of Philosophy at Schools and Universities Yearbook.Arie Kizel (ed.) - 2021 - Zürich:
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  28. The facilitator as self-liberator and enabler: ethical responsibility in communities of philosophical inquiry.Arie Kizel - 2021 - Childhood and Philosophy 17:1-20.
    From its inception, philosophy for/with children (P4wC) has sought to promote philosophical discussion with children based on the latter’s own questions and a pedagogic method designed to encourage critical, creative, and caring thinking. Communities of inquiry can be plagued by power struggles prompted by diverse identities, however. These not always being highlighted in the literature or P4wC discourse, this article proposes a two-stage model for facilitators as part of their ethical responsibility. In the first phase, they should free themselves from (...)
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  29. Children’s experiences of online philosophical dialogues.Caroline Schaffalitzky, Søren Sindberg Jensen & Frederik Schou-Juul - 2021 - Childhood and Philosophy 17:01-27.
    Researchers are increasingly interested in the impact of philosophical dialogues with children. Studies have shown that this approach helps realise dialogic ideals in learning environments and that Philosophy with Children significantly impacts children’s cognitive and social skills. However, other aspects of this approach have attracted less attention – for example, given the focus on children’s thinking, voices and perspectives in Philosophy with Children, surprisingly few studies have examined how children experience philosophical dialogues. The aim of this study was to help (...)
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  30. Practising Philosophy of Mathematics with Children.Elisa Bezençon - 2020 - Philosophy of Mathematics Education Journal 36.
    This article examines the possibility of philosophizing about mathematics with children. It aims at outlining the nature of the practice of philosophy of mathematics with children in a mainly theoretical and exploratory way. First, an attempt at a definition is proposed. Second, I suggest some reasons that might motivate such a practice. My thesis is that one can identify an intrinsic as well as two extrinsic goals of philosophizing about mathematics with children. The intrinsic goal is related to a presumed (...)
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  31. Book review: In Community of Inquiry with Ann Margaret Sharp: Childhood, Philosophy and Education, by Maughn Rollins Gregory and Megan Jane Laverty (eds). [REVIEW]Gilbert Burgh - 2020 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 7 (1):132-138.
    In Community of Inquiry with Ann Margaret Sharp: Childhood, Philosophy and Education is the first in a series edited by Maughn Gregory and Megan Laverty, Philosophy for Children Founders, and is a major contribution to the literature on philosophy in schools. It draws attention to an author and practitioner who was largely responsible for the development of scholarship on the community of inquiry, who co-founded the Institute for the Advancement of Philosophy for Children (IAPC), and who undeniably made a significant (...)
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  32. filosofia para crianças: a (im)possibilidade de lhe chamar outras coisas.Magda Costa Carvalho - 2020 - Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil: NEFI Edições.
    Apresentamos um trabalho composto por um conjunto de reflexões nascidas em tempos e espaços distintos. A maior parte dos capítulos retoma textos já publicados, mas que foram repensados e reescritos a partir do que hoje vemos. Outros só agora se tornam dia. Paralelamente à escolha dos textos, à depuração da escrita e ao afinamento da redação, um outro exercício emergiu: pensar cada capítulo como evento de um processo cujo dinamismo próprio não se deixa fixar. Os textos mostraram-se, então, como inscrições (...)
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  33. Resisting the 'View from Nowhere': Positionality in Philosophy for/with Children Research.Peter Paul Elicor - 2020 - Philosophia International Journal of Philosophy (Philippines) 1 (21):10-33.
    While Philosophy for/with Children (P4wC) provides a better alternative to the usual ‘banking’ model of education, questions have been raised regarding its applicability in non-western contexts. Despite its adherence to the ideals of democratic dialogue, not all members of a Community of Inquiry (COI) will be disposed to participate in the inquiry, not because they are incapable of doing so, but because they are positioned inferiorly within the group thereby affecting their efforts to speak out on topics that are meaningful (...)
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  34. Community of Inquiry (CoI) for Distance Learning in the Philippines: Appraising Lee’s CoI through Garrison’s CoI.Lumberto Mendoza, Marielle Zosa, Jairus Espiritu & Alexander Atrio Lopez - 2020 - Diliman Review 64 (1):168-199.
    This paper is a critical appraisal of Lee’s framework (2020) for the Community of Inquiry (CoI) pedagogy in light of Garrison’s work (2000, 2001, 2010, 2016, 2017) in the context of synchronous and asynchronous distance learning. Using the latter as springboard, Lee’s CoI framework is examined based on Garrison’s three presences: cognitive, social, and teaching presence. The paper discusses the similarities between Lee’s CoI and Garrison’s CoI, and expounds on the differences between the two (i.e. the end goal of a (...)
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  35. 子どもの哲学と民主主義 選好の変化とコンセンサス形成を 可視化するワークの開発と実践̶.Kei Nishiyama - 2020 - 思考と対話 1 (2):26-37.
    This article examines the relationship between Philosophy for/with Children and democracy from both theoretical and empirical perspectives. The first half of the article draws on the theory of deliberative democracy to identify some democratic aspects of Philosophy for/with Children. The second half of the article empirically investigates the way in which we can practice Philosophy for/with Children as a practice of deliberative democracy. To this end, the article illustrates the classroom activity designed by the authors, the aim of which is (...)
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  36. The Utah Lyceum: Cultivating "Reasonableness" in Southwest Utah.Kristopher G. Phillips & Gracia Allen - 2020 - In Claire Elise Katz (ed.), Growing Up with Philosophy Camp: How Learning to Think Develops Friendship, Community, and a Sense of Self. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. pp. 111-120.
    In this chapter we discuss the role of what we call "reasonableness" in a philosophy summer camp held at Southern Utah University. "Reasonableness," as we call it, is a more narrowly prescribed form of rationality - indeed one can be rational but unreasonable, but not the other way around. We discuss the importance and value of introducing philosophy to students before they get to college, and describe some of the challenges we face in introducing students in SW Utah to philosophy.
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  37. Against directive teaching in the moral Community of Inquiry: A response to Michael Hand.Michelle Sowey & Grace Lockrobin - 2020 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 7 (2).
    While we consider directive teaching to be detrimental to the Community of Inquiry, we nonetheless find ourselves in qualified agreement with Hand as he challenges certain norms of practice that support the common presumption in favour of nondirective teaching in the moral CoI. We agree with Hand that it is possible for teachers to impart their own moral beliefs without indoctrinating students, yet we argue that the risk of indoctrination remains present in the many realistic scenarios in which teachers misjudge (...)
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  38. Engineer education as citizenship education.Ogawa Taiji, Murase Tomoyuki & Kei Nishiyama - 2020 - In Ogawa Taiji, Murase Tomoyuki & Kei Nishiyama (eds.), Proceedings of InInternational Symposium on Advances in Technology Education Conference. International Symposium on Advances in Technology Education. pp. 326-331.
    Engineering and technology aim to lead a better life for people. But the meaning of “better” is highly contested in modern democratic societies where different citizens have different cultures and values. Engineers, as one of the citizens in such societies, are also living in multicultural and multi-value settings, and therefore they need to be responsible for such diversity when they engage in technological developments. Therefore, in engineering education, it is necessary to aim at not only acquiring the specialized technological knowledge (...)
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  39. A possibilidade do tempo e a temporalidade dos possíveis na comunidade de investigação filosófica.Magda Costa Carvalho - 2019 - Revista Do NESEF 2 (8):62-76.
    Following Lévinas, for whom the Bergsonian defense of duration beyond time that is merely chronological corresponds to the release of terror of a world where novelty is impossible, this article proposes, in the field of philosophy for children, a thought exercise beyond what is known and mastered, that upsets the comfortable and habitual rhythms of the predictable and dislodges itself from naturally accepted ideas. Starting from the intersection of the Bergsonian concepts of possibility and temporality, we propose promoting collaborative, problematizing (...)
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  40. Finding Treasures: Is the Community of Philosophical Inquiry a Methodology?Magda Costa Carvalho & Walter Omar Kohan - 2019 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 38 (3):275-289.
    In the world of Philosophy for Children (P4C), the word “method” is found frequently in its literature and in its practitioner’s handbooks. This paper focuses on the idea of community of philosophical inquiry (CPI) as P4C’s methodological framework for educational purposes, and evaluates that framework and those purposes in light of the question, what does it mean to bring children and philosophy together, and what methodological framework, if any, is appropriate to that project? Our broader aim is to highlight a (...)
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  41. Philosophical Inquiry with Indigenous Children: An Attempt to Integrate Indigenous Knowledge in Philosophy for/with Children.Peter Paul Ejera Elicor - 2019 - Childhood and Philosophy 15:1-22.
    In this article, I propose to integrate indigenous knowledges in the Philosophy for/with Children theory and practice. I make the claim that it is possible to treat indigenous knowledges, not only as topics for philosophical dialogues with children but as presuppositions of the philosophical activity itself within the Community of Inquiry. Such integration is important for at least three (3) reasons: First, recognizing indigenous ways of thinking and seeing the world informs us of other non-dominant forms of knowledges, methods to (...)
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  42. Bringing Undergraduates to Preschool: An Ethics Course for the Very Young.Erik Kenyon - 2019 - In Thomas E. Wartenberg (ed.), Philosophy in Classrooms and Beyond: New Approaches to Picture-Book Philosophy. Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. pp. 1-16.
  43. Ethics for the Very Young: A Philosophy Curriculum for Early Childhood Education.Erik Kenyon - 2019 - Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield.
    Can you be brave if you’re afraid? Why do we “know better” and do things anyway? What makes a family? Philosophers have wrestled with such questions for centuries. They are also the stuff of playground debates. Ethics for the Very Young uses the perplexities of young children’s lives to spark philosophical dialogue. Its lessons scaffold discussion through executive function games (Telephone, Red Light Green Light), dialogic reading of picture books and Reggio Emilia’s art-based inquiry. In the process, children develop skills (...)
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  44. 'Why teachers’ beliefs and values are important in p4c research: A Victorian perspective.Ben Kilby - 2019 - Childhood and Philosophy 15:01-19.
    This paper argues that there is an absence of current research in Philosophy for Children that focusses on teachers’ perspectives, particularly in relation to their beliefs and values. The paper will look briefly at the programmatics of P4C, and its current mandated status in the education system in the state of Victoria, Australia. It will then move to exploring how the study of teachers’ perspectives, through analyses of their beliefs and values, adds significant value in education, particularly in the context (...)
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  45. I–Thou dialogical encounters in adolescents’ WhatsApp virtual communities.Arie Kizel - 2019 - AI and Society 34 (1):19-27.
    The use of WhatsApp as a means of communication is widespread amongst today‘s youth, many of whom spend hours in virtual space, in particular during the evenings and nighttime in the privacy of their own homes. This article seeks to contribute to the discussion of the dialogical language and ―conversations‖ conducted in virtual-space encounters and the way in which young people perceive this space, its affect on them, and their interrelations within it. It presents the findings of a study based (...)
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  46. Finding Treasures: Is the Community of Philosophical Inquiry a Methodology?Walter Omar Kohan & Magda Costa Carvalho - 2019 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 38 (3):275-289.
    In the world of Philosophy for Children, the word “method” is found frequently in its literature and in its practitioner’s handbooks. This paper focuses on the idea of community of philosophical inquiry as P4C’s methodological framework for educational purposes, and evaluates that framework and those purposes in light of the question, what does it mean to bring children and philosophy together, and what methodological framework, if any, is appropriate to that project? Our broader aim is to highlight a problem with (...)
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  47. My Favorite Philosophical Question Is..Stephen Miller - 2019 - Questions 19:13-15.
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  48. Rethinking consensus in the community of philosophical inquiry: A research agenda.Kei Nishiyama - 2019 - Childhood and Philosophy 15:83-97.
    In Philosophy for Children (P4C), consensus-making is often regarded as something that needs to be avoided. P4C scholars believe that consensus-making would dismiss P4C’s ideals, such as freedom, inclusiveness, and diversity. This paper aims to counteract such assumptions, arguing that P4C scholars tend to focus on a narrow, or universal, concept of “consensus” and dismiss various forms of consensus, especially what Niemeyer and Dryzek (2007) call meta-consensus. Meta-consensus does not search for universal consensus, but focuses on the process by which (...)
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  49. Aporia and Picture Books.Maria daVenza Tillmanns - 2019 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 39 (2):11-22.
    Here is an example using a picture book story: A New House, in Grasshopper on the Road: by Arnold Lobel Grasshopper sees an apple on top of a hill and decides, yum! lunch, as he takes a big bite out of the apple. This, however, causes the apple to start rolling down the hill. Grasshopper hears a voice inside the apple, telling him to keep his house from being destroyed as it is rolling down the hill. My bathtub is in (...)
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  50. teaching critical thinking and metacognitive skills through philosophical enquiry. A practitioner's report on experiments in the classroom.Emma Worley & Peter Worley - 2019 - Childhood and Philosophy 15:01-34.
    Although expert consensus states that critical thinking (CT) is essential to enquiry, it doesn’t necessarily follow that by practicing enquiry children are developing CT skills. Philosophy with children programmes around the world aim to develop CT dispositions and skills through a community of enquiry, and this study compared the impact of the explicit teaching of CT skills during an enquiry, to The Philosophy Foundation's philosophical enquiry (PhiE) method alone (which had no explicit teaching of CT skills). Philosophy with children is (...)
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