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  1. Combatting Consumer Madness.Wayne Henry, Mort Morehouse & Susan T. Gardner - forthcoming - Teaching Ethics.
    In his 2004 article “Hannah Arendt and Jean Baudrillard: Pedagogy in the Consumer Society,” Trevor Norris bemoans the degree to which contemporary education’s focus can increasingly be described as primarily nurturing “consumers in training.” He goes on to add that the consequences of such “mindless” consumerism is that it “erodes democratic life, reduces education to the reproduction of private accumulation, prevents social resistance from expressing itself as anything other than political apathy, and transforms all human relations into commercial transactions of (...)
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  2. Vegan Parents and Children: Zero Parental Compromise.Carlo Alvaro - 2020 - Ethics and Education (4):476-498.
    Marcus William Hunt argues that when co-parents disagree over whether to raise their child (or children) as a vegan, they should reach a compromise as a gift given by one parent to the other out of respect for his or her authority. Josh Millburn contends that Hunt’s proposal of parental compromise over veganism is unacceptable on the ground that it overlooks respect for animal rights, which bars compromising. However, he contemplates the possibility of parental compromise over ‘unusual eating,’ of animal-based (...)
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  3. Practising Philosophy of Mathematics with Children.Elisa Bezençon - 2020 - Philosophy of Mathematics Education Journal 36.
    This article examines the possibility of philosophizing about mathematics with children. It aims at outlining the nature of the practice of philosophy of mathematics with children in a mainly theoretical and exploratory way. First, an attempt at a definition is proposed. Second, I suggest some reasons that might motivate such a practice. My thesis is that one can identify an intrinsic as well as two extrinsic goals of philosophizing about mathematics with children. The intrinsic goal is related to a presumed (...)
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  4. filosofia para crianças: a (im)possibilidade de lhe chamar outras coisas.Magda Costa Carvalho - 2020 - Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil: NEFI Edições.
    Apresentamos um trabalho composto por um conjunto de reflexões nascidas em tempos e espaços distintos. A maior parte dos capítulos retoma textos já publicados, mas que foram repensados e reescritos a partir do que hoje vemos. Outros só agora se tornam dia. Paralelamente à escolha dos textos, à depuração da escrita e ao afinamento da redação, um outro exercício emergiu: pensar cada capítulo como evento de um processo cujo dinamismo próprio não se deixa fixar. Os textos mostraram-se, então, como inscrições (...)
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  5. Resisting the 'View From Nowhere': Positionality in Philosophy for/with Children Research.Peter Paul Elicor - 2020 - Philosophia International Journal of Philosophy (Philippines) 1 (21):10-33.
    While Philosophy for/with Children (P4wC) provides a better alternative to the usual ‘banking’ model of education, questions have been raised regarding its applicability in non-western contexts. Despite its adherence to the ideals of democratic dialogue, not all members of a Community of Inquiry (COI) will be disposed to participate in the inquiry, not because they are incapable of doing so, but because they are positioned inferiorly within the group thereby affecting their efforts to speak out on topics that are meaningful (...)
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  6. You Are Only as Good as You Are Behind Closed Doors: The Stability of Virtuous Dispositions.Rena Beatrice Goldstein - 2020 - Philosophy Documentation Center 2:1-19.
    Virtues are standardly characterized as stable dispositions. A stable disposition implies that the virtuous actor must be disposed to act well in any domain required of them. For example, a politician is not virtuous if s/he is friendly in debate with an opponent, but hostile at home with a partner or children. Some recent virtue theoretic accounts focus on specific domains in which virtues can be exercised. I call these domain-variant accounts of virtue. This paper examines two such accounts: Randall (...)
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  7. 子どもの哲学と民主主義 選好の変化とコンセンサス形成を 可視化するワークの開発と実践̶.Kei Nishiyama - 2020 - 思考と対話 1 (2):26-37.
    This article examines the relationship between Philosophy for/with Children and democracy from both theoretical and empirical perspectives. The first half of the article draws on the theory of deliberative democracy to identify some democratic aspects of Philosophy for/with Children. The second half of the article empirically investigates the way in which we can practice Philosophy for/with Children as a practice of deliberative democracy. To this end, the article illustrates the classroom activity designed by the authors, the aim of which is (...)
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  8. The Utah Lyceum: Cultivating "Reasonableness" in Southwest Utah.Kristopher G. Phillips & Gracia Allen - 2020 - In Claire Katz (ed.), Growing Up with Philosophy Camp. Lanham, MD 20706, USA: pp. 111-120.
    In this chapter we discuss the role of what we call "reasonableness" in a philosophy summer camp held at Southern Utah University. "Reasonableness," as we call it, is a more narrowly prescribed form of rationality - indeed one can be rational but unreasonable, but not the other way around. We discuss the importance and value of introducing philosophy to students before they get to college, and describe some of the challenges we face in introducing students in SW Utah to philosophy.
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  9. КАК ФИЛОСОФСТВОВАНИЕ С ДЕТЬМИ СПОСОБСТВУЕТ РАЗВИТИЮ ПРОПРИОЦЕПЦИИ МЫШЛЕНИЯ И ЭМОЦИОНАЛЬНОГО ИНТЕЛЛЕКТА.Maria daVenza Tillmanns - 2020 - Социум И Власть 1 (81):96-103.
    Аннотация Статья представляет собой более подробное рассмотрение тех проблем, которые были на- мечены в первой части данного исследования «Применение проприоцепции мышления в фи- лософствовании с детьми» («Социум и власть», 2019, № 4). На этот раз автор уделяет внимание характеристике мышления как процесса в пра- ктике философствования с детьми, обосновы- вая эффективность данной практики, которая формирует осознанность действий и развивает эмоциональный интеллект. Автор противо- поставляет статичное абстрактное мышление динамике неявного конкретного мыслительного процесса. Философствование с детьми в диало- говой форме всецело вовлекает (...)
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  10. Is the Ugly Duckling a Hero? Philosophical Inquiry as an Approach to Hans Christian Andersen's Fairy Tales in Danish Primary School Teaching.Anne Klara Bom & Caroline Schaffalitzky - 2019 - Forum for World Literature Studies 11 (2):226-241.
    Hans Christian Andersen is a cultural icon, and his fairy tales are famous around the world. But despite the positive ring to this description, his status as a canonized author poses a challenge when he is passed on to new generations of readers. In this article, we show examples of how this challenge reveals itself in Danish primary school teaching where Andersen is an obligatory figure in the subject Danish where he is frequently framed as a national romantic author of (...)
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  11. Finding Treasures: Is the Community of Philosophical Inquiry a Methodology?Magda Costa Carvalho & Walter Kohan - 2019 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 38 (3):275-289.
    In the world of Philosophy for Children, the word “method” is found frequently in its literature and in its practitioner’s handbooks. This paper focuses on the idea of community of philosophical inquiry as P4C’s methodological framework for educational purposes, and evaluates that framework and those purposes in light of the question, what does it mean to bring children and philosophy together, and what methodological framework, if any, is appropriate to that project? Our broader aim is to highlight a problem with (...)
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  12. Philosophical Inquiry with Indigenous Children: An Attempt to Integrate Indigenous Knowledge in Philosophy for/with Children.Peter Paul Elicor - 2019 - Childhood and Philosophy 15:1-22.
    In this article, I propose to integrate indigenous knowledges in the Philosophy for/with Children theory and practice. I make the claim that it is possible to treat indigenous knowledges, not only as topics for philosophical dialogues with children but as presuppositions of the philosophical activity itself within the Community of Inquiry. Such integration is important for at least three (3) reasons: First, recognizing indigenous ways of thinking and seeing the world informs us of other non-dominant forms of knowledges, methods to (...)
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  13. O Ensino De Filosofia como Problema Filosófico: revendo Alejandro Cerletti.Sandro Rinaldi Feliciano - 2019 - In Fabio Gabriel (ed.), Filosofia, Educação e Ensino: perspectivas contemporâneas. Curitiba, PR, Brasil: Editora Multifoco. pp. 13-33.
    O ensino de filosofia é hoje feito de diversas formas (práticas), sendo as três principais (ou bases), a histórica, a temática e a criação conceitual. No entanto parece muito mais plausível e até saudável uma combinação entre duas destas formas, ou até as três, mas isto não elimina a problemática das perguntas: "qual é a melhor forma?", ou "qual é a mais certa?" ou ainda "qual é a mais eficaz ou a mais eficiente?", na medida em que estas combinações em (...)
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  14. Existentially Dope.Devon Johnson - 2019 - The Philosophers' Magazine 86:36-43.
  15. Finding Treasures: Is the Community of Philosophical Inquiry a Methodology?Walter Omar Kohan & Magda Costa Carvalho - 2019 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 38 (3):275-289.
    In the world of Philosophy for Children, the word “method” is found frequently in its literature and in its practitioner’s handbooks. This paper focuses on the idea of community of philosophical inquiry as P4C’s methodological framework for educational purposes, and evaluates that framework and those purposes in light of the question, what does it mean to bring children and philosophy together, and what methodological framework, if any, is appropriate to that project? Our broader aim is to highlight a problem with (...)
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  16. Australian Research Into the Benefits of Philosophy for Children.Stephan John Millett, Alan Tapper & Rosie Scholl - 2019 - In Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton (eds.), Philosophical Inquiry with Children. Abingdon, UK: Routledge. pp. 199-214.
  17. The Kids Are Alright: Philosophical Dialogue and the Utah Lyceum.Kristopher G. Phillips - 2019 - Precollege Philosophy and Public Practice 1:42-57.
    This paper serves as a call to philosophers both to create more precollege philosophy programs, and to push back against the instrumentalization of the value of philosophy. I do not intend to defend the intrinsic value of philosophy in this paper, though in an indirect way I will offer a defense of the value of precollege philosophy. I discuss the history, theory and practice behind the Utah Lyceum, a precollege philosophy summer camp program I helped create in rural Utah. I (...)
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  18. The Application of Proprioception to Doing Philosophy with Children.Maria daVenza Tillmanns - 2019 - Социум И Власть 4 (78):62-68.
    This paper focuses on creating a paradigm shift; looking at how philosophy for and with children can inform philosophy, instead of having philosophy inform philosophy for and with children. My work in doing philosophy with children has shown me the limitations to trying to understand their way of doing philosophy through the lens of how adults understand philosophy and the influence western philosophy has had on the perception of what kids do when they are involved in philosophical group discussions. The (...)
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  19. Da Árvore E Do Rizoma: Pensar Para Além Do Método o Encontro da Filosofia Com a Inf'ncia.Magda Costa Carvalho & Walter Omar Kohan - 2018 - Educação E Filosofia 32 (65).
    This work aims to consider philosophically the issue of the method in philosophical practices with children. It analyzes some influences received by the creators of Philosophy for Children, Matthew Lipman and Ann Margaret Sharp, like the pragmatism of J. Dewey. It describes the meanings of three similar expressions in Lipman's work: methodical, methodological and method. It offers some criticisms of method: Hans-Georg Gadamer, but especially Henri Bergson and Gilles Deleuze. Finally, he questions the need of a method for doing philosophy (...)
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  20. In Community of Inquiry with Ann Margaret Sharp: Childhood, Philosophy and Education.Maughn Rollins Gregory & Megan Laverty (eds.) - 2018 - London, UK: Routledge.
    In close collaboration with the late Matthew Lipman, Ann Margaret Sharp pioneered the theory and practice of ‘the community of philosophical inquiry’ (CPI) as a way of practicing ‘Philosophy for Children’ and prepared thousands of philosophers and teachers throughout the world in this practice. In Community of Inquiry with Ann Margaret Sharp represents a long-awaited and much-needed anthology of Sharp’s insightful and influential scholarship, bringing her enduring legacy to new generations of academics, postgraduate students and researchers in the fields of (...)
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  21. Paulo Freire and Philosophy for Children: A Critical Dialogue.Walter Kohan - 2018 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 37 (6):615-629.
    This paper is an attempt to connect the Brazilian Paulo Freire’s well known educational thinking with the “philosophy for children” movement. It considers the relationship between the creator of philosophy for children, Matthew Lipman and Freire through different attempts to establish a relationship between these two educators. The paper shows that the relationship between them is not as close as many supporters of P4C have claimed, especially in Latin America. It also considers the context of Educational Policies in our time (...)
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  22. Aporia and the Implications for the Intuitive Knowledge of Children | Blog of the APA.Maria daVenza Tillmanns - 2018 - Blog of the APA.
    The compass we use to navigate life needs to be cultivated from an early age. My sense is that the arts, including Plato’s dialogues cultivate our navigational sense. It does not tell us rationally what is good or what is bad. It is not that simple. Remember, the stars we sail by, are not fixed, either. So we need to develop a sense for what may be right or not in any particular situation. We may have a general sense, but (...)
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  23. The Routledge International Handbook of Philosophy for Children.Maughn Rollins Gregory, Joanna Haynes & Karin Murris (eds.) - 2017 - London, UK: Routledge.
    This rich and diverse collection offers a range of perspectives and practices of Philosophy for Children (P4C). P4C has become a significant educational and philosophical movement with growing impact on schools and educational policy. Its community of inquiry pedagogy has been taken up in community, adult, higher, further and informal educational settings around the world. The internationally sourced chapters offer research findings as well as insights into debates provoked by bringing children’s voices into moral and political arenas and to philosophy (...)
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  24. Reconstruction of Thinking Across the Curriculum Through the Community of Inquiry.Kim Nichols, Gilbert Burgh & Liz Fynes-Clinton - 2017 - In Maughn Rollins Gregory, Joanna Haynes & Karin Murris (eds.), The Routledge International Handbook of Philosophy for Children. Abingdon: Routledge. pp. 245-252.
    Thinking skills pedagogies like those employed in a community of inquiry (COI) provide a powerful teaching method that fosters reconstruction of thinking in both teachers and students. This collaborative, dialogic approach enables teachers and students to think deeply about the thinking process within a supportive, structured learning environment, by fostering the transformative potential of lived experience. This paper explores the potential for cognitive dissonance (genuine doubt) during students’ experiences of inquiry to be transformed into impetus for the acquisition and improvement (...)
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  25. Children, Intuitive Knowledge and Philosophy.Maria daVenza Tillmanns - 2017 - Philosophy Now 119:20-23.
    This paper explores the notion that children have a knowledge of the world of their own – an intuitive knowledge. Being fully immersed in the world as adults are, they too have a knowledge of the world. In contrast to adults, who have developed a cognitive knowledge of the world, children still depend on their intuitive knowledge. Children certainly have a strong grasp of the world they live in; it’s just not dependent on cognitive knowledge. In my paper I compare (...)
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  26. Internal Goods of Teaching in Philosophy for Children: The Role of the Teacher and the Nature of Teaching in Pfc.Riku Välitalo - 2017 - Childhood and Philosophy 13 (27):271-290.
    Philosophy for Children promotes a pedagogy that builds on a collective process of truth-seeking and meaning-making. In contrast to seeing teachers as sources of knowledge, they are often described as facilitators in this communal process. PFC is part of the larger movement in education that has aimed to put the child at the center of the teaching and learning process. Yet, PFC, similar to other child-centered pedagogies, brings new challenges to understanding the role of the teacher. This article traces the (...)
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  27. Lucid Education: Resisting Resistance to Inquiry.Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton - 2016 - Oxford Review of Education 42 (2):165–177.
    Within the community of inquiry literature, the absence of the notion of genuine doubt is notable in spite of its pragmatic roots in the philosophy of Charles Sanders Peirce, for whom the notion was pivotal. We argue for the need to correct this oversight due to the educational significance of genuine doubt—a theoretical and experiential understanding of which can offer insight into the interrelated concepts of wonder, fallibilism, inquiry and prejudice. In order to detail these connections, we reinvigorate the ideas (...)
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  28. Inoculation Against Wonder: Finding an Antidote in Camus, Pragmatism and the Community of Inquiry.Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton - 2016 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 48 (9):884-898.
    In this paper, we will explore how Albert Camus has much to offer philosophers of education. Although a number of educationalists have attempted to explicate the educational implications of Camus’ literary works, these analyses have not attempted to extrapolate pedagogical guidelines towards developing an educational framework for children’s philosophical practice in the way Matthew Lipman did from John Dewey’s philosophy of education, which informed his philosophy for children curriculum and pedagogy. We focus on the phenomenology of inquiry; that is, inquiry (...)
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  29. Philosophy in Schools: An Introduction for Philosophers and Teachers. [REVIEW]Laura D’Olimpio - 2016 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 3 (1):104-106.
    Philosophy in Schools: An introduction for philosophers and teachers edited by Sara Goering, Nicholas J Shudak and Thomas E Wartenberg. Taylor & Francis, New York, NY. ISBN: 9780415640633. The edited collection Philosophy in Schools: An introduction for philosophers and teachers is exactly that; an introduction to the central ideas of the Philosophy in Schools movement, with tips and strategies as to how to implement Philosophy for Children in your classroom or educational space. With 25 chapters, this handy edition includes the (...)
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  30. Kizel, A. (2016). “Philosophy with Children as an Educational Platform for Self-Determined Learning”. Cogent Education, Vol. 3, Number 1: 1244026.Arie Kizel - 2016 - Cogent Education 3 (1):1244026.
    This article develops a theoretical framework for understanding the applicability and relevance of Philosophy with Children in and out of schools as a platform for self-determined learning in light of the developments of the past 40 years. Based on the philosophical writings of Matthew Lipman, the father of Philosophy for Children, and in particular his ideas regarding the search for meaning, it frames Philosophy with Children in six dimensions that contrast with classic classroom disciplinary learning, advocating a “pedagogy of searching” (...)
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  31. Від «додаткових класів» до «народного училища». Світський освітній заклад у Харкові 1775–1789 рр.Volodymyr Masliychuk - 2016 - Kyivan Academy 13:228-247.
    Історія виникнення світських навчальних закладів, поява нової, світської освіти потребує детального дослідження. Створення у Харкові «додаткових класів» 1768 р. — одна з перших спроб на шляху до світської школи на Слобожанщині. Від початку вона залежала від світської влади і мала широку палітру предметів, утримувала сиротинець. Однак протягом другої половини 1770-х рр. заклад набув і мілітарних рис, чому сприяв директор Іван Колбек, хоча й зберіг «класи» малювання та співів, власну структуру, принципи функціонування та матеріальне забезпечення. На відміну від багатьох інших світських (...)
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  32. Philosophy in Education: Questioning and Dialog in K-12 Classrooms.Jana Mohr Lone & Michael D. Burroughs - 2016 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Philosophy in Education: Questioning and Dialog in K-12 Classrooms is a textbook in the fields of pre-college philosophy and philosophy of education, intended for philosophers and philosophy students, K-12 classroom teachers, administrators and educators, policymakers, and pre-college practitioners of all kinds.
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  33. Philosophy for Children as an Educational Practice.Riku Välitalo, Hannu Juuso & Ari Sutinen - 2016 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 35 (1):79-92.
    During the past 40 years, the Philosophy for Children movement has developed a dialogical framework for education that has inspired people both inside and outside academia. This article concentrates on analysing the historical development in general and then taking a more rigorous look at the recent discourse of the movement. The analysis proceeds by examining the changes between the so-called first and second generation, which suggests that Philosophy for Children is adapting to a postmodern world by challenging the humanistic ideas (...)
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  34. Engagement as Dialogue: Camus, Pragmatism and Constructivist Pedagogy.Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton - 2015 - Education as Philosophies of Engagement, 44th Annual Conference of the Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia, Kingsgate Hotel, Hamilton, New Zealand, 22–25 November 2014.
    In this paper we will explore how Albert Camus has much to offer philosophers of education. Although a number of educationalists have attempted to explicate the educational implications of Camus’ literary works (Denton, 1964; Oliver, 1965; Götz, 1987; Curzon-Hobson, 2003; Marshall, 2007, 2008; Weddington, 2007; Roberts, 2008, 2013; Gibbons, 2013; Heraud, 2013; Roberts, Gibbons & Heraud, 2013) these analyses have not attempted to extrapolate pedagogical guidelines to develop an educational framework for children’s philosophical practice in the way Matthew Lipman did (...)
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  35. Selling "The Reason Game".Susan T. Gardner - 2015 - Teaching Ethics 15 (1):129-136.
    There is a clear distinction between genuine and fraudulent reasoning. Being seduced by the latter can result in horrific consequences. This paper explores how we can arm ourselves, and others with the ability to recognize the difference between genuine and pseudo-reasoning, with the motivation to maintain an unbending commitment to follow the “impersonal” “norm-driven” rules of reason even in situations in which “non-reasonable” strategies appear to support short-term bests interests, and with the confidence that genuine reasoning is the best defense (...)
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  36. The Community of Inquiry: Blending Philosophical and Empirical Research.Clinton Golding - 2015 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 34 (2):205-216.
    Philosophical research tends to be done separately from empirical research, but this makes it difficult to tackle questions which require both. To make it easier to address these hybrid research questions, I argue that we should sometimes combine philosophical and empirical investigations. I start by describing a continuum of research methods from data collecting and analysing to philosophical arguing and conceptualising. Then, I outline one possible middle-ground position where research is equally philosophical and empirical: the Community of Inquiry reconceived as (...)
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  37. Philosophy in Education: Questioning and Dialogue in Schools.Jana Mohr Lone & Michael D. Burroughs - 2015 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Philosophy in Education: Questioning and Dialogue in Schools is intended for philosophers and philosophy students, precollege classroom teachers, administrators and educators, policymakers, and pre-college practitioners of all kinds. This text book offers a wealth of practical resources and lesson plans for use in precollege classrooms, as well as consideration of many of the broader educational, social, and political topics in the field.
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  38. Sokratisk dialog som pedagogisk metod.Erik Persson - 2015 - Filosofisk Tidskrift 2015 (2):13-19.
    Sokrates var inte bara en filosofisk nydanare. Genom sitt sätt att involvera sina samtalspartners i den filosofiska processen var han också i hög utsträckning en pedagogisk nydanare. Hans pedagogiska grundidé var den så kallade majeutiska metoden – det vill säga ”barnmorskemetoden”. Med det menade han att han inte överförde sina egna färdiga tankar till den han talade med utan han hjälpte sin samtalspartner att föda sina egna tankar. Inom pedagogiken är det vanligt att använda den så kallade ”Sokratiska metoden” vilket (...)
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  39. We Made Progress: Collective Epistemic Progress in Dialogue Without Consensus.Clinton Golding - 2013 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 47 (3):423-440.
    Class discussions about ethical, social, philosophical and other controversial issues frequently result in disagreement. This leaves a problem: has there been any progress? This article introduces and analyses the concept ‘collective epistemic progress’ in order to resolve this problem. The analysis results in four main ways of understanding, guiding and judging collective epistemic progress in the face of seemingly irreconcilable differences. Although it might seem plausible to analyse and judge collective epistemic progress by the increasing vigour of the dialogue community, (...)
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  40. Perceiving “The Philosophical Child”: A Guide for the Perplexed.Susan T. Gardner - 2012 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 33 (2):73-76.
    Though Jana Mohr Lone refers to children’s striving to wonder, to question, to figure out how the world works and where they fit as the “philosophical self,” like its parent discipline, it could be argued that the philosophical self is actually the “parent self,”—the wellspring of all the other aspects of personhood that we traditionally parse out, e.g., the intellectual, moral, social, and emotional selves. If that is the case, then to be blind to “The Philosophical Child,” the latter being (...)
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  41. Epistemic Progress: A Construct for Understanding and Evaluating Inquiry.Clinton Golding - 2012 - Educational Theory 62 (6):677-693.
    In this essay Clinton Golding introduces a new construct and area of research — epistemic progress — and argues that it can shed new light on educational inquiry. By clearly distinguishing progress through developing better ideas from progress through developing better inquiry skills , teachers and students can better understand, participate in, and evaluate inquiry. In addition, epistemic progress complements other epistemic constructs, such as “knowledge,” and could provide new insights about different kinds of inquiry or research, as well as (...)
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  42. Cultivating Creativity and Self-Reflective Thinking Through Dialogic Teacher Education.Arie Kizel - 2012 - US-China Education Review 2 (2):237 – 249.
    A new program of teacher training in a dialogical spirit in order to prepare them towards working in the field of philosophy with children combines cultivating creativity and self-reflective thinking had been operated as a part of cooperation between the academia and the education system in Israel. This article describes the program that is a part of their practice towards co-operation between academia and schools as a part of PDS (Professional Development Schools) partnership. The program fosters creativity and self-reflective thinking (...)
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  43. The Philosophical Child.Jana Mohr Lone - 2012 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Many parents welcome the idea of being able to talk with their children about life's big questions, but are unsure where to begin. In The Philosophical Child, Mohr Lone offers parents easy ways to introduce philosophical questions to their children and to gently help them explore significant issues.
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  44. Philosophy and Education: Introducing Philosophy to Young People.Jana Mohr Lone & Roberta Israeloff (eds.) - 2012 - Cambridge Scholars Press.
    Are children natural philosophers? They are curious about the mysteries of the human experience and about questions such as the meaning and purpose of being alive and whether we can know anything at all. Pre-college philosophy takes as a starting point young people's inherent interest in large questions about the human condition. Philosophy and Education: Introducing Philosophy to Young People seeks to illuminate the ways in which philosophy can strengthen and deepen pre-college education.
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  45. What Would Socrates Say To Mrs Smith?Susan Gardner - 2011 - Philosophy Now 84:13-15.
    In the face of disobedience, and in the name of the short-term goal of a smooth-functioning and/or happy household, parents often feel caught between two diametrically opposed parenting strategies; make it happen or let it go. However, either strategy of dictator or friend can seriously jeopardize a child’s long-term best interests. If children, adolescents, young adults, full adults or oldsters are even to hear, let alone reasonably answer, the prudential and ethical “whys” that their intended actions scream, they will need (...)
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  46. Agitating for Munificence or Going Out of Business: Philosophy’s Dilemma.Susan T. Gardner - 2011 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 31 (1):1-4.
    Philosophy has a dirty little secret and it is this: a whole lot of philosophers have swallowed the mechanistic billiard ball deterministic view of human action—presumably because philosophy assumes that science demands it, and/or because modern attempts to articulate in what free will consists seem incoherent. This below-the-surface-purely-academic commitment to mechanistic determinism is a dirty little secret because an honest public commitment would render virtually all that is taught in philosophy departments incomprehensible. Can “lovers of wisdom” really continue to tolerate (...)
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  47. The Many Faces of Constructivist Discussion.Clinton Golding - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (5):467-483.
    Although constructivist discussions in the classroom are often treated as if they were all of the same kind, in this paper I argue that there are subtle but important distinctions that need to be made. An analysis of these distinctions shows that there is a continuum of different constructivist discussions. At one extreme are teacher-directed discussions where students are led to construct the ‘correct’ understanding of a pre-decided conclusion; at the other extreme are unstructured discussions where students are free to (...)
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  48. Matthew Lipman’s Philosophy For Children Program: A Liberal Conception Of Education.Renê José Trentin Silveira - 2011 - Childhood and Philosophy 7 (13):121-139.
    This article argues that Matthew Lipman’s Philosophy for Children Program is based on a liberal conception of the relationship between education and society--a conception from which the idealist and non-critical character of his pedagogy derives. In order to demonstrate this, a short characterization of this conception is initially presented, emphasizing the equalizing and “redeeming” social mission that it entrusts to the schools. Afterwards, it briefly describes some of the main aspects of Lipman’s program, then explains the way in which it (...)
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  49. Enacting Dialogue: The Impact of Promoting Philosophy for Children on the Literate Thinking of Identified Poor Readers, Aged 10.Philip Jenkins - 2010 - Language and Education 24 (6):459-472.
    The Philosophy for Children in Schools Project (P4CISP) is a research project to monitor and evaluate the impact of Philosophy for Children (P4C) on classroom practices. In this paper the impact of P4C on the thinking skills of you children aged 10 is examined. Standardised tests indicated the children had below-average reading ages. The pupils were video recorded while engaged in discussion of questions they had formulated themselves in response to a series of texts in preparation for a community of (...)
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  50. Matthew Lipman: Testimonies and Homages.David Kennedy & Walter Kohan - 2010 - Childhood and Philosophy 6 (12):167-210.
    We lead off this issue of Childhood and Philosophy with a collection of testimonies, homages, and brief memoirs offered from around the world in response to the death of the founder of Philosophy for Children, Matthew Lipman on December 26, 2010, at the age of 87. To characterize Lipman as “founder” is completely accurate, but barely evokes the role he played in conceiving, giving birth to, and nurturing this curriculum cum pedagogy that became a movement, and which has taken root (...)
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