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  1. Philosophy with Children as an Educational Platform for Self-Determined Learning.Kizel Arie - 2016 - Cogent Education 3 (1):1244026.
    Abstract -/- This article develops a theoretical framework for understanding the applicability and relevance of Philosophy with Children in and out of schools as a platform for self-determined learning in light of the developments of the past 40 years. Based on the philosophical writings of Matthew Lipman, the father of Philosophy for Children, and in particular his ideas regarding the search for meaning, it frames Philosophy with Children in six dimensions that contrast with classic classroom disciplinary learning, advocating a “pedagogy (...)
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  2. Lucid Education: Resisting Resistance to Inquiry.Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton - 2016 - Oxford Review of Education 42 (2):165–177.
    Within the community of inquiry literature, the absence of the notion of genuine doubt is notable in spite of its pragmatic roots in the philosophy of Charles Sanders Peirce, for whom the notion was pivotal. We argue for the need to correct this oversight due to the educational significance of genuine doubt—a theoretical and experiential understanding of which can offer insight into the interrelated concepts of wonder, fallibilism, inquiry and prejudice. In order to detail these connections, we reinvigorate the ideas (...)
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  3. Inoculation Against Wonder: Finding an Antidote in Camus, Pragmatism and the Community of Inquiry.Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton - 2016 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 48 (9):884-898.
    In this paper, we will explore how Albert Camus has much to offer philosophers of education. Although a number of educationalists have attempted to explicate the educational implications of Camus’ literary works, these analyses have not attempted to extrapolate pedagogical guidelines towards developing an educational framework for children’s philosophical practice in the way Matthew Lipman did from John Dewey’s philosophy of education, which informed his philosophy for children curriculum and pedagogy. We focus on the phenomenology of inquiry; that is, inquiry (...)
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  4. Engagement as Dialogue: Camus, Pragmatism and Constructivist Pedagogy.Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton - 2015 - Education as Philosophies of Engagement, 44th Annual Conference of the Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia, Kingsgate Hotel, Hamilton, New Zealand, 22–25 November 2014.
    In this paper we will explore how Albert Camus has much to offer philosophers of education. Although a number of educationalists have attempted to explicate the educational implications of Camus’ literary works (Denton, 1964; Oliver, 1965; Götz, 1987; Curzon-Hobson, 2003; Marshall, 2007, 2008; Weddington, 2007; Roberts, 2008, 2013; Gibbons, 2013; Heraud, 2013; Roberts, Gibbons & Heraud, 2013) these analyses have not attempted to extrapolate pedagogical guidelines to develop an educational framework for children’s philosophical practice in the way Matthew Lipman did (...)
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  5. Philosophy in Schools: An Introduction for Philosophers and Teachers. [REVIEW]L. D'Olimpio - 2016 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 3 (1):104-106.
  6. The Community of Inquiry: Blending Philosophical and Empirical Research.Clinton Golding - 2015 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 34 (2):205-216.
    Philosophical research tends to be done separately from empirical research, but this makes it difficult to tackle questions which require both. To make it easier to address these hybrid research questions, I argue that we should sometimes combine philosophical and empirical investigations. I start by describing a continuum of research methods from data collecting and analysing to philosophical arguing and conceptualising. Then, I outline one possible middle-ground position where research is equally philosophical and empirical: the Community of Inquiry reconceived as (...)
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  7. We Made Progress: Collective Epistemic Progress in Dialogue Without Consensus.Clinton Golding - 2013 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 47 (3):423-440.
    Class discussions about ethical, social, philosophical and other controversial issues frequently result in disagreement. This leaves a problem: has there been any progress? This article introduces and analyses the concept ‘collective epistemic progress’ in order to resolve this problem. The analysis results in four main ways of understanding, guiding and judging collective epistemic progress in the face of seemingly irreconcilable differences. Although it might seem plausible to analyse and judge collective epistemic progress by the increasing vigour of the dialogue community, (...)
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  8. Epistemic Progress: A Construct for Understanding and Evaluating Inquiry.Clinton Golding - 2012 - Educational Theory 62 (6):677-693.
    In this essay Clinton Golding introduces a new construct and area of research — epistemic progress — and argues that it can shed new light on educational inquiry. By clearly distinguishing progress through developing better ideas from progress through developing better inquiry skills , teachers and students can better understand, participate in, and evaluate inquiry. In addition, epistemic progress complements other epistemic constructs, such as “knowledge,” and could provide new insights about different kinds of inquiry or research, as well as (...)
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  9. The Many Faces of Constructivist Discussion.Clinton Golding - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (5):467-483.
    Although constructivist discussions in the classroom are often treated as if they were all of the same kind, in this paper I argue that there are subtle but important distinctions that need to be made. An analysis of these distinctions shows that there is a continuum of different constructivist discussions. At one extreme are teacher-directed discussions where students are led to construct the ‘correct’ understanding of a pre-decided conclusion; at the other extreme are unstructured discussions where students are free to (...)
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  10. "That's a Better Idea!" Philosophical Progress for Philosophy for Children.Clinton Golding - 2009 - Childhood and Philosophy 5 (10):223-269.
    Philosophy for Children is an important educational programme that engages children in philosophical inquiry as the means for them to make sense of the world. A key to its success is that students make progress in their attempts to make sense of the world or, more colloquially, they develop better ideas. Although philosophical progress is essential to the value of Philosophy for Children, there is little written on this concept and what is written tends to be merely suggestive. The result (...)
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  11. The Philosophy Teacher as Guide.Clinton Golding - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 27:29-37.
    Central to Philosophy for Children is the commitment that children follow their inquiry where it leads. Teacher interventions that introduce questions and problems from the philosophical tradition are problematic for this commitment. They seem to be necessary to scaffold a rigorous inquiry, but they also threaten todirect the inquiry down the teacher’s chosen path rather than the students’. This paper suggests a way to balance following student inquiry where it leads with introducing knowledge from the philosophical tradition. It will be (...)
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  12. The Routledge International Handbook of Philosophy for Children.Maughn Rollins Gregory, Joanna Haynes & Karin Murris (eds.) - 2017 - London, UK: Routledge.
    This rich and diverse collection offers a range of perspectives and practices of Philosophy for Children (P4C). P4C has become a significant educational and philosophical movement with growing impact on schools and educational policy. Its community of inquiry pedagogy has been taken up in community, adult, higher, further and informal educational settings around the world. The internationally sourced chapters offer research findings as well as insights into debates provoked by bringing children’s voices into moral and political arenas and to philosophy (...)
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  13. In Community of Inquiry with Ann Margaret Sharp: Childhood, Philosophy and Education.Maughn Rollins Gregory & Megan Laverty (eds.) - 2018 - London, UK: Routledge.
    In close collaboration with the late Matthew Lipman, Ann Margaret Sharp pioneered the theory and practice of ‘the community of philosophical inquiry’ (CPI) as a way of practicing ‘Philosophy for Children’ and prepared thousands of philosophers and teachers throughout the world in this practice. In Community of Inquiry with Ann Margaret Sharp represents a long-awaited and much-needed anthology of Sharp’s insightful and influential scholarship, bringing her enduring legacy to new generations of academics, postgraduate students and researchers in the fields of (...)
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  14. Enacting Dialogue: The Impact of Promoting Philosophy for Children on the Literate Thinking of Identified Poor Readers, Aged 10.Philip Jenkins - 2010 - Language and Education 24 (6):459-472.
    The Philosophy for Children in Schools Project (P4CISP) is a research project to monitor and evaluate the impact of Philosophy for Children (P4C) on classroom practices. In this paper the impact of P4C on the thinking skills of you children aged 10 is examined. Standardised tests indicated the children had below-average reading ages. The pupils were video recorded while engaged in discussion of questions they had formulated themselves in response to a series of texts in preparation for a community of (...)
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  15. "I Am Scared Too": Children's Literature for an Ethics Beyond Moral Concepts. Johansson - 2013 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 47 (4):80-109.
    This essay explores how moral discourse can have dogmatic tendencies. In exemplifying how it is possible to move beyond such tendencies, this essay turns to the Norwegian picture book Garmann's Summer. The essay not only suggests a vision of moral thinking, but also aims to demonstrate the role that literature, and particularly children's literature, can play in moral discourse, particularly in philosophy. The picture book's elaborations on the difficulties children can face when starting school show both what ethics beyond moral (...)
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  16. From philosophical to mathematical inquiry in the classroom.Nadia Kennedy - 2007 - Childhood and Philosophy 3 (6):289-311.
    This paper discusses some major similarities and differences between community of philosophical inquiry and community of mathematical inquiry , and offers a few examples of the implementation of CMI in the context of a school mathematics classroom. Three modes of CMI are suggested. The first mode facilitates inquiry into mathematical problems - that is, it provides a medium for “doing and talking mathematics.” In this case, CMI is primarily an avenue for problem solving—defining problems, interpreting them, working with different methods (...)
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  17. Cultivating Creativity and Self-Reflective Thinking Through Dialogic Teacher Education.Arie Kizel - 2012 - US-China Education Review 2 (2):237 – 249.
    A new program of teacher training in a dialogical spirit in order to prepare them towards working in the field of philosophy with children combines cultivating creativity and self-reflective thinking had been operated as a part of cooperation between the academia and the education system in Israel. This article describes the program that is a part of their practice towards co-operation between academia and schools as a part of PDS (Professional Development Schools) partnership. The program fosters creativity and self-reflective thinking (...)
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  18. Paulo Freire and Philosophy for Children: A Critical Dialogue.Walter Omar Kohan - 2018 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 37 (6):615-629.
    This paper is an attempt to connect the Brazilian Paulo Freire’s well known educational thinking with the “philosophy for children” movement. It considers the relationship between the creator of philosophy for children, Matthew Lipman and Freire through different attempts to establish a relationship between these two educators. The paper shows that the relationship between them is not as close as many supporters of P4C have claimed, especially in Latin America. It also considers the context of Educational Policies in our time (...)
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  19. Qué Es Filosofía Para Niños? Ideas y Propuestas Para Pensar la Educación.Walter Kohan & Vera Waksman - 1997 - Buenos Aires, Argentina: Oficina de Publicaciones del CBC.
  20. Dialogic Teaching: Discussing Theoretical Contexts and Reviewing Evidence From Classroom Practice.Sue Lyle - 2008 - Language and Education 22 (3):222-240.
    Drawing on recent developments in dialogic approaches to learning and teaching, I examine the roots of dialogic meaning-making as a concept in classroom practices. Developments in the field of dialogic pedagogy are reviewed and the case for dialogic engagement as an approach to classroom interaction is considered. The implications of dialogic classroom approaches are discussed in the context of educational research and classroom practice. Dialogic practice is contrasted with monologic practices as evidenced by the resilient of the IRF as the (...)
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  21. Reconstruction of Thinking Across the Curriculum Through the Community of Inquiry.Kim Nichols, Gilbert Burgh & Liz Fynes-Clinton - 2017 - In Maughn Rollins Gregory, Joanna Haynes & Karin Murris (eds.), The Routledge International Handbook of Philosophy for Children. Abingdon: Routledge. pp. 245-252.
    Thinking skills pedagogies like those employed in a community of inquiry (COI) provide a powerful teaching method that fosters reconstruction of thinking in both teachers and students. This collaborative, dialogic approach enables teachers and students to think deeply about the thinking process within a supportive, structured learning environment, by fostering the transformative potential of lived experience. This paper explores the potential for cognitive dissonance (genuine doubt) during students’ experiences of inquiry to be transformed into impetus for the acquisition and improvement (...)
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  22. Studies in Philosophy for Children: Harry Stottlemeier's Discovery.Ann Margaret Sharp, Ronald F. Reed & Matthew Lipman (eds.) - 1992 - Temple University Press.
    In this first part, Matthew Lipman offers the reader a glimpse at the thought processes that resulted in Philosophy for Children and, in so doing, ...
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  23. Matthew Lipman’s Philosophy For Children Program: A Liberal Conception Of Education.Renê José Trentin Silveira - 2011 - Childhood and Philosophy 7 (13):121-139.
    This article argues that Matthew Lipman’s Philosophy for Children Program is based on a liberal conception of the relationship between education and society--a conception from which the idealist and non-critical character of his pedagogy derives. In order to demonstrate this, a short characterization of this conception is initially presented, emphasizing the equalizing and “redeeming” social mission that it entrusts to the schools. Afterwards, it briefly describes some of the main aspects of Lipman’s program, then explains the way in which it (...)
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  24. The Special Exclusion Services Unit - Administrational Doubles and Their Unlawful Pseudo-Function in Higher Education; the Univ. Of Oslo Case and the Univ. Of Agder Case (2016, Re-Edited May 2017).Kai Soerfjord - manuscript
  25. Quote- and Citation Fraud at the UiO, Chapter 2; with 'The Learning of Value' and the Connection to Mob-Bullying in Our Schools (by Dr. Kai Sørfjord) 2016.Kai Soerfjord - unknown
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  26. Aporia and the Implications for the Intuitive Knowledge of Children | Blog of the APA.Maria daVenza Tillmanns - 2018 - Blog of the APA.
    The compass we use to navigate life needs to be cultivated from an early age. My sense is that the arts, including Plato’s dialogues cultivate our navigational sense. It does not tell us rationally what is good or what is bad. It is not that simple. Remember, the stars we sail by, are not fixed, either. So we need to develop a sense for what may be right or not in any particular situation. We may have a general sense, but (...)
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  27. Children, Intuitive Knowledge and Philosophy.Maria daVenza Tillmanns - 2017 - Philosophy Now 119:20-23.
    This paper explores the notion that children have a knowledge of the world of their own – an intuitive knowledge. Being fully immersed in the world as adults are, they too have a knowledge of the world. In contrast to adults, who have developed a cognitive knowledge of the world, children still depend on their intuitive knowledge. Children certainly have a strong grasp of the world they live in; it’s just not dependent on cognitive knowledge. In my paper I compare (...)
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  28. Philosophical Counseling and Teaching: "Holding the Tension" in a Dualistic World.Maria Davenza Tillmanns - 1998 - Dissertation, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    In this dissertation, I develop a theory of philosophical counseling and teaching. It is the outcome of my holding the tension of my practical and theoretical viewing points. Holding the tension is a term which Maurice Friedman coined to counter the idea of dichotomous either/or thinking and any attempt to synthesize thought into unity or fusion. ;This dissertation focuses on Buber's notion of the dialogical, which implies acknowledging the other's otherness. Buber's notion of other is diametrically opposed to the post-modern (...)
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  29. Filosoferen met Kinderen.Maria daVenza Tillmanns - 1992 - Prana 71.
  30. Internal Goods of Teaching in Philosophy for Children: The Role of the Teacher and the Nature of Teaching in Pfc.Riku Välitalo - 2017 - Childhood and Philosophy 13 (27):271-290.
    Philosophy for Children promotes a pedagogy that builds on a collective process of truth-seeking and meaning-making. In contrast to seeing teachers as sources of knowledge, they are often described as facilitators in this communal process. PFC is part of the larger movement in education that has aimed to put the child at the center of the teaching and learning process. Yet, P4C, as other child-centered pedagogies, brings new challenges to understanding the role of the teacher. This article traces the questions (...)
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  31. Philosophy for Children as an Educational Practice.Riku Välitalo, Hannu Juuso & Ari Sutinen - 2016 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 35 (1):79-92.
    During the past 40 years, the Philosophy for Children movement has developed a dialogical framework for education that has inspired people both inside and outside academia. This article concentrates on analysing the historical development in general and then taking a more rigorous look at the recent discourse of the movement. The analysis proceeds by examining the changes between the so-called first and second generation, which suggests that Philosophy for Children is adapting to a postmodern world by challenging the humanistic ideas (...)
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