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  1. Why Tamagatchis Are Not Pets.Deborah Barnbaum - 1998 - Thinking: The Journal of Philosophy for Children 13 (4):41-43.
    What makes "digital pets" pets? This article posits four necessary and jointly sufficient conditions for an individual to be a pet, concluding that digital pets fail to meet these sufficient criteria and thus are not pets.
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  2. Philosophy for Children as a Response to Gender Problems.Jennifer Bleazby - 2009 - Thinking: The Journal of Philosophy for Children 19 (2-3):70-78.
    This paper will outline some of the ways in which traditional pedagogies facilitate ‘masculine’ ideals of thinking, while excluding and denigrating the ‘feminine’. It will be shown that unlike traditional pedagogies, P4C reconstructs the gendered dualisms that form the basis of traditional gender stereotypes. Consequently, P4C reconstructs traditional gender stereotypes and challenges the traditional gendering of school subjects, which contributes to the underperformance of girls in math and science and the devaluation of the ‘feminine’ arts and humanities. It will also (...)
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  3. Ethics and the Community of Inquiry: Education for Deliberative Democracy.Gilbert Burgh, Terri Field & Mark Freakley - 2006 - South Melbourne: Cengage/Thomson.
    Ethics and the Community of Inquiry gets to the heart of democratic education and how best to achieve it. The book radically reshapes our understanding of education by offering a framework from which to integrate curriculum, teaching and learning and to place deliberative democracy at the centre of education reform. It makes a significant contribution to current debates on educational theory and practice, in particular to pedagogical and professional practice, and ethics education.
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  4. Melarete and Peech: Preface to an International Philosophy with Children Collaboration.Michael Burroughs & Mortari Luigina - 2017 - Childhood and Philosophy 13 (26):69-86.
    In this paper we discuss two research programs – MELARETE and Philosophical Ethics in Early Childhood – and an emerging international research collaboration based on the benefits of practicing philosophy for meaning in early and middle childhood education. We argue for the good of philosophical thinking and its benefits to young students, with a particular focus on ethical development and meaning. We contend that through philosophical pedagogy we can make learning, meaning, vital to students. This is particularly relevant when dealing (...)
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  5. Justice and Children’s Rights: The Role of Moral Psychology in the Practical Philosophy Discourse.Mar Cabezas - 2016 - Las Torres de Lucca: Revista Internacional de Filosofía Política 5 (8):41-73.
    Justice for children meets specific obstacles when it comes to its realization due not only to the nature of rights and the peculiarities of children as subjects of rights. The conflict of interests between short-term and long-term aims, and the different interpretations a state can do on the question concerning how to materialize social rights policies and how to interpret its commitments on social justice play also a role. Starting by the question on why the affluent states do not seem (...)
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  6. Fact, Value and Philosophy Education.Philip Cam - 2014 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 1 (1).
    In Fact, value and philosophy education I tried to show how philosophy can help to overcome the fact-value divide that continues to plague education. In attempting this, I applied John Dewey’s suggestion that philosophy may help to integrate beliefs about matters of fact with values in society at large, to the curricular division between subjects that deal with knowledge of matters of fact and those that are largely devoted to subjective understanding and personal expression. The paper centres on the claim (...)
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  7. Philosophy for Children, Values Education and the Inquiring Society.Philip Cam - 2014 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 46 (11):1-9.
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  8. Community of Philosophical Inquiry: Citizenship in Scottish Classrooms. 'You Need to Think Like You've Never Thinked Before.'.Claire Cassidy & Donald Christie - 2014 - Childhood and Philosophy 10 (19):33-54.
    The context for the study is the current curriculum reform in Scotland which demands that teachers enable children to become ‘Responsible Citizens’. The aim of the study was to evaluate the use of Community of Philosophical Inquiry as a pedagogical tool to enhance citizenship attributes in Scottish children in a range of educational settings. Before and after an extended series of CoPI sessions, the 133 participating children were presented with dilemmas designed to elicit responses which indicate their ability to make (...)
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  9. Racism as ‘Reasonableness’: Philosophy for Children and the Gated Community of Inquiry.Darren Chetty - 2018 - Ethics and Education 13 (1):39-54.
    In this paper, I argue that the notion of ‘reasonableness’ that is, for many, at the heart of the Philosophy for Children approach particularly and education for democratic citizenship more broadly, is constituted within the epistemology of ‘white ignorance’ and operates in such a way that it is unlikely to transgress the boundaries of white ignorance so as to view it from without. Drawing on scholarship in critical legal studies and social epistemology, I highlight how notions of reasonableness often include (...)
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  10. Venture in/Between Ethics, Education and Literary Media: Making Cases for Dialogic Communities of Ethical Enquiry.Kenny Colm - 2017 - Dissertation, Dublin City University
    The thesis contends that education and literary studies can make a valuable contribution to ethics and ethical development of persons, their relations with others and with the world. It promotes an approach to ethics education through dialogic enquiry based on theories and practices associated with comparative literature and philosophical enquiry. These involve students sharing experiences and meanings as they participate in interpretive communities and communities of philosophical enquiry. There are two main components to the research: ethically focused studies of literary (...)
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  11. What's Wrong with This Picture?: Teaching Ethics Through Film to Wyoming High School Students.Robert Colter & Joseph Ulatowski - 2013 - Teaching Philosophy 36 (3):253-270.
    We regularly teach for the Wyoming High School Institute (“HSI”), a three-week college experience for rising high school juniors. The purpose of HSI is to introduce pre-college students to subjects not regularly taught in the secondary school curriculum. In our course, we introduce moral philosophy through the use of feature films. More narrowly, we challenge the students to examine moral reasoning through analysis of the moral reasoning of characters in these films. Our pedagogical approach is based in the methods of (...)
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  12. Sentir, pensar, agir: estrutura ética do programa de Filosofia para Crianças.Magda Costa Carvalho - 2016 - In Malvina Dorneles (ed.), O Sensível e a Sensibilidade na Pesquisa em Educação. Bahia: Editora Universidade Federal do Recôncavo da Bahia. pp. 87-108.
    In the 1970s, Lipman and Sharp created the Philosophy for Children programme, which was later adopted by several countries and implemented according to specific settings and pedagogical nuances. At the same time, Philosophy for Children is nowadays an autonomous subject in Philosophy and its history has been acknowledged. Its purpose goes beyond the logical structuring of thought, and its philosophical-educational premise offers an operative complementarity between rationality and affectivity. Demanding challenges are put to the facilitators of the communities of philosophical (...)
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  13. O que significa ser eticamente crítico? Algumas reflexões sobre a Filosofia para Crianças.Magda Costa Carvalho - 2014 - In Rui Marques Vieira, Celina Tenreiro-Vieira, Idália Sá-Chaves & Celeste Maria Machado (eds.), Pensamento Crítico na Educação: Perspetivas Atuais no Panorama Internacional. Aveiro: Universidade de Aveiro. pp. 71-81.
    A nossa reflexão aborda o projeto de Filosofia para Crianças iniciado nos Estados Unidos da América por Matthew Lipman e Ann Sharp. Procuraremos refletir acerca das linhas de articulação entre as dimensões cognitiva e ética deste projeto, escolhendo como fio condutor a interrogação o que significa ser eticamente crítico? Pretendemos, assim, sistematizar algumas das ideias de Lipman e Sharp em torno do pensamento crítico, sobretudo nas suas implicações éticas.
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  14. Philosophy in Schools: An Introduction for Philosophers and Teachers. [REVIEW]L. D'Olimpio - 2016 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 3 (1):104-106.
  15. Philosophy for Children Meets the Art of Living: A Holistic Approach to an Education for Life.L. D'Olimpio & C. Teschers - 2016 - Philosophical Inquiry in Education 23 (2):114-124.
    This article explores the meeting of two approaches towards philosophy and education: the philosophy for children approach advocated by Lipman and others, and Schmid’s philosophical concept of Lebenskunst. Schmid explores the concept of the beautiful or good life by asking what is necessary for each individual to be able to develop their own art of living and which aspects of life are significant when shaping a good and beautiful life. One element of Schmid’s theory is the practical application of philosophy (...)
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  16. Media and Moral Education: A Philosophy of Critical Engagement.Laura D'Olimpio - 2018 - London, UK: Routledge.
    Media and Moral Education demonstrates that the study of philosophy can be used to enhance critical thinking skills, which are sorely needed in today’s technological age. It addresses the current oversight of the educational environment not keeping pace with rapid advances in technology, despite the fact that educating students to engage critically and compassionately with others via online media is of the utmost importance. -/- D’Olimpio claims that philosophical thinking skills support the adoption of an attitude she calls critical perspectivism, (...)
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  17. Philosophy for Children in Turkey.Nuran Direk - 2006 - The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 4:17-21.
    In this essay, I shall both inquire into the relationship between democracy and education in general and concentr ate on education in philosophy for children in the Turkish cultural context. I argue that education in philosophy for children is useful for teaching the acquisition of knowledge from the information provided, for questioning of rules in different contexts, and for the analysis of facts encountered in daily life. Ethical attitudes can neither be derived from the information provided about the moral rules, (...)
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  18. Fables and Philosophy.Beth Dixon - 2015 - Teaching Ethics 15 (1):71-81.
    In our local school district some teachers have chosen to use fables as a way of integrating character education into their 4th and 5th grade curriculum. This paper about fables and philosophy illustrates how to employ philosophical inquiry to discuss the moral virtues. Aristotle’s remarks about the particular moral virtue of friendliness is a paradigmatic example for writing philosophy discussion plans that cultivate ethical judgment—one component of educating for moral character. However, the methodology I recommend can be generalized to stories (...)
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  19. Trust as a Virtue in Education.Laura D’Olimpio - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (2):193-202.
    As social and political beings, we are able to flourish only if we collaborate with others. Trust, understood as a virtue, incorporates appropriate rational emotional dispositions such as compassion as well as action that is contextual, situated in a time and place. We judge responses as appropriate and characters as trustworthy or untrustworthy based on these factors. To be considered worthy of trust, as an individual or an institution, one must do the right thing at the right time for the (...)
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  20. Improving Teacher Education Students’ Ethical Thinking Using the Community of Inquiry Approach.Mark Freakley & Gilbert Burgh - 1999 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 19 (1):38-45.
    The notion of a community of inquiry has been treated by many of its proponents as being an exemplar of democracy in action. We argue that the assumptions underlying this view present some practical and theoretical difficulties, particularly in relation to distribution of power among the members of a community of inquiry. We identify two presuppositions in relation to distribution of power that require attention in developing an educational model that is committed to deliberative democracy: (1) openness to inquiry and (...)
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  21. Values Education in Schools: A Resource Book for Student Inquiry.Mark Freakley, Gilbert Burgh & Lyne Tilt MacSporran - 2008 - Camberwell, Vic, Australia: ACER.
    Values Education in Schools is a new resource for teachers involved in values and ethics education. It provides a range of 'practical philosophy' resources for secondary school teachers that can be used in English, religious education, citizenship, personal development and social science subjects. The materials include narratives to engage students in philosophical inquiry, doing ethics through the activity of philosophy, not simply learning about it.
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  22. Philosophy with Children, Inquiry Ethics and Value Transmission : Merits, Demerits and Relations Between the Approaches.Viktor Gardelli - manuscript
    Education for participation – Philosophizing back a "new" life after acquired brain injury.
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  23. To Describe, Transmit or Inquire: Ethics and Technology in School.Viktor Gardelli - 2016 - Dissertation, Luleå University of Technology
    Ethics is of vital importance to the Swedish educational system, as in many other educational systems around the world.Yet, it is unclear how ethics should be dealt with in school, and prior research and evaluations have found serious problems regarding ethics in education.The field of moral education lacks clear and widely accepted definitions of key concepts, and these ambiguities negatively impact both research and educational practice. This thesis draws a distinction between three approaches to ethics in school – the descriptive (...)
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  24. Why Philosophical Ethics in School: Implications for Education in Technology and in General.Viktor Gardelli, Eva Alerby & Anders J. Persson - 2014 - Ethics and Education 9 (1):16-28.
    In this article, we distinguish between three approaches to ethics in school, each giving an interpretation of the expression ‘ethics in school’: the descriptive facts about ethics approach, roughly consisting of teaching empirical facts about moral matters to students; the moral fostering approach, consisting of mediating a set of given values to students; and the philosophical ethics (PE) approach, consisting of critically discussing and evaluating moral issues with students. Thereafter, three influential arguments for why there ought to be ethics in (...)
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  25. Coherentism as a Foundation for Ethical Dialog and Evaluation in School : Value Communication, Assessment and Mediation.Viktor Gardelli, Anders Persson, Liza Haglund & Ylva Backman - unknown
    In this paper, we are mainly concerned with coherentism as an approach to ethical dialog in school. We have two different but connected aims with the paper. The first aim is to say something about general philosophical questions relating to coherentism as a theory in metaethics, and especially in relation to value education; the second aim is to explore some possible implications of coherentism as a method in studying the enterprise of discussing ethical issues and questions with children as well (...)
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  26. Practicing Democracy.Maughn Gregory - 2004 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 18 (2):163-176.
    In pragmatist social theory communities faced with significant troubles or opportunities inquire after their advantage and reconstruct their habits and their environments. Three programs of philosophical practice—Socratic Dialogue, the Philosophy Café and Philosophy for Children—cultivate citizenly virtues necessary for this process. They facilitate dialogue and open-ended inquiry, give practice in cognitive and social skills, and institute shared authority. However, certain factors limit the programs’ effectiveness for citizenship education. They tend to construe social problems and opportunities in strictly discursive terms; they (...)
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  27. Ethics Education and the Practice of Wisdom.Maughn Rollins Gregory - 2018 - In Elena K. Theodoropoulou, Didier Moreau & Christiane Gohier (eds.), Ethics in Education: Philosophical tracings and clearings. Rhodes: Laboratory of Research on Practical and Applied Philosophy, University of the Aegean. pp. 199-234.
    Ethics education in post-graduate philosophy departments and professional schools involves disciplinary knowledge and textual analysis but is mostly unconcerned with the ethical lives of students. Ethics or values education below college aims at shaping students’ ethical beliefs and conduct but lacks philosophical depth and methods of value inquiry. The «values transmission» approach to values education does not provide the opportunity for students to express doubt or criticism of the proffered values, or to practice ethical inquiry. The «inquiry» approach to values (...)
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  28. Ethics Education as Philosophical Practice in Advance.Maughn Rollins Gregory - 2009 - Teaching Ethics 9 (2):105-130.
    Ethics education in post-graduate philosophy departments and professional schools involves disciplinary knowledge and textual analysis but is mostly unconcerned with the ethical lives of students. Ethics or values education below college aims at shaping students’ ethical beliefs and conduct but lacks philosophical depth and methods of value inquiry. The «values transmission» approach to values education does not provide the opportunity for students to express doubt or criticism of the proffered values, or to practice ethical inquiry. The «inquiry» approach to values (...)
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  29. The Routledge International Handbook of Philosophy for Children.Maughn Rollins Gregory, Joanna Haynes & Karin Murris (eds.) - 2017 - London, UK: Routledge.
    This rich and diverse collection offers a range of perspectives and practices of Philosophy for Children (P4C). P4C has become a significant educational and philosophical movement with growing impact on schools and educational policy. Its community of inquiry pedagogy has been taken up in community, adult, higher, further and informal educational settings around the world. The internationally sourced chapters offer research findings as well as insights into debates provoked by bringing children’s voices into moral and political arenas and to philosophy (...)
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  30. In Community of Inquiry with Ann Margaret Sharp: Childhood, Philosophy and Education.Maughn Rollins Gregory & Megan Laverty (eds.) - 2018 - London, UK: Routledge.
    In close collaboration with the late Matthew Lipman, Ann Margaret Sharp pioneered the theory and practice of ‘the community of philosophical inquiry’ (CPI) as a way of practicing ‘Philosophy for Children’ and prepared thousands of philosophers and teachers throughout the world in this practice. In Community of Inquiry with Ann Margaret Sharp represents a long-awaited and much-needed anthology of Sharp’s insightful and influential scholarship, bringing her enduring legacy to new generations of academics, postgraduate students and researchers in the fields of (...)
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  31. On the Distinctive Educational Value of Philosophy.Michael Hand - 2018 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 5 (1).
  32. Secrets And Boundaries In Classroom Dialogues With Children: From Critical Episode To Social Enquiry.Joanna Haynes - 2005 - Childhood and Philosophy 1 (2):511-536.
    Events in teaching often bubble up and demand attention because they stay with us long after the moment has passed, causing us to revisit and recreate them, perhaps to ask ourselves whether we might have responded differently. Deeper reflection and wider social enquiry become possible when incidents are recorded over time. Themes are identified and form the basis of theorizing and alternative action. Themes tend to emerge from awareness of our emotional responses to events and through an investigation of the (...)
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  33. Proceedings Aktueel Filosoferen, 15e Nederlands-Vlaams Annual Philosophy Conference.van Dooren en Hoff (ed.) - 1993
  34. "I Am Scared Too": Children's Literature for an Ethics Beyond Moral Concepts. Johansson - 2013 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 47 (4):80-109.
    This essay explores how moral discourse can have dogmatic tendencies. In exemplifying how it is possible to move beyond such tendencies, this essay turns to the Norwegian picture book Garmann's Summer. The essay not only suggests a vision of moral thinking, but also aims to demonstrate the role that literature, and particularly children's literature, can play in moral discourse, particularly in philosophy. The picture book's elaborations on the difficulties children can face when starting school show both what ethics beyond moral (...)
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  35. Philosophic Communities of Inquiry: The Search for and Finding of Meaning as the Basis for Developing a Sense of Responsibility.Arie Kizel - 2017 - Childhood and Philosophy 13 (26):87 - 103.
    The attempt to define meaning arouses numerous questions, such as whether life can be meaningful without actions devoted to a central purpose or whether the latter guarantee a meaningful life. Communities of inquiry are relevant in this context because they create relationships within and between people and the environment. The more they address relations—social, cognitive, emotional, etc.—that tie-in with the children’s world even if not in a concrete fashion, the more they enable young people to search for and find meaning. (...)
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  36. From Laboratory to Praxis: Communities of Philosophical Inquiry as a Model of (and for) Social Activism.Arie Kizel - 2016 - Childhood and Philosophy 12 (25):497 – 517.
    This article discusses the conditions under which dialogical learner-researchers can move out of the philosophical laboratory of a community of philosophical inquiry into the field of social activism, engaging in a critical and creative examination of society and seeking to change it. Based on Matthew Lipman’s proposal that communities of philosophical inquiry can serve as a model of social activism in the present, it presents the community of philosophical inquiry as a model for social activism in the future. In other (...)
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  37. Philosophy with Children, the Poverty Line, and Socio-Philosophic Sensitivity.Arie Kizel - 2015 - Childhood and Philosophy 11 (21):139-162.
    A philosophy with children community of inquiry encourage children to develop a philosophical sensitivity that entails awareness of abstract questions related to human existence. When it operates, it can allow insight into significant philosophical aspects of various situations and their analysis. This article seeks to contribute to the discussion of philosophical sensitivity by adducing an additional dimension—namely, the development of a socio-philosophical sensitivity by means of a philosophical community of inquiry focused on texts linked to these themes and an analysis (...)
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  38. Ethics is for Children Revisiting Aristotle's Virtue Theory.Andrew Komasinski - 2016 - In David Kennedy & Brock Bahler (eds.), Philosophy of Childhood Today. Lanham, MD, USA: Lexington Books. pp. 39-52.
    Building on the research of Daryl Tress and others in terms of Aristotle's views of children and the function-argument in the Nicomachean Ethics as analzyed by Ackrill and Nagel (inter alia), I first look at how Aristotle viewed children within ethics. I then suggest an alternate approach where children could be virtuous agents and have their own form of eudaimonia, which includes but is not wholly defined by the fact that they grow into adult humans.
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  39. How Effective is Philosophy for Children in Contributing to the Affective Engagement of Pupils in the Context of Secondary Religious Education?Asha Lancaster-Thomas - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 4 (1).
    This paper reports the findings of a predominantly qualitative study that explored the effects of the practice of Philosophy for Children on pupils’ affective engagement.[1] From its conception, the practice of P4C has been linked to the development of caring and collaborative thinking and the study aimed to closely consider that relationship. An appropriate self-designed P4C program was implemented with 75 Year 9 pupils of Religious Education at an independent secondary school in the United Kingdom. An interpretive research approach was (...)
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  40. Ethical Reasoning and the Craft of Moral Practice.Dr Matthew Lipman - 1987 - Journal of Moral Education 16 (2):139-147.
    Non-indoctrinational moral education involves teaching children to engage in ethical inquiry. This means that, since ethical inquiry has the status of a craft, the students will be apprentices in that craft. The classroom becomes, for this purpose, a community of ethical inquiry ? an ethical atelier where students learn the tools, methods, practices and procedures which craftsmen associated with that tradition customarily utilize. It is only when one is adept at the generic procedures of reasoning that one can be adept (...)
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  41. The Educational Role of Philosophy.Mat Lipman - 2014 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 1 (1).
    The history of the relationship between philosophy and education has been a long and troubled one. In part, this stemmed from the problematic nature of philosophy itself, but this difficulty was compounded by controversy as to the age at which training in philosophy should begin. Although Socrates seemed indifferent to whether he conversed philosophically with young or old, his pupil, Plato, was inclined to restrict philosophy to mature students, on the grounds that it made the younger ones unduly contentious. Since (...)
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  42. Ethical Reasoning and the Craft of Moral Practice.Matthew Lipman - 1987 - Journal of Moral Education 16 (2):139-147.
    Non-indoctrinational moral education involves teaching children to engage in ethical inquiry. This means that, since ethical inquiry has the status of a craft, the students will be apprentices in that craft. The classroom becomes, for this purpose, a community of ethical inquiry - an ethical atelier where students learn the tools, methods, practices and procedures which craftsmen associated with that tradition customarily utilize. It is only when one is adept at the generic procedures of reasoning that one can be adept (...)
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  43. Philosophy for Children, Community of INquiry, and Human Rights Education.Karen Mizell - 2015 - Childhood and Philosophy 11 (22):319-328.
    The Community of Inquiry is a unique discourse model that brings adults and children together in collaborative discussions of philosophical and ethical topics. This paper examines the potential for COI to deepen children’s moral and intellectual understanding through recursive discourse that encourages them to transcend cultural limitations, confront their own moral predispositions, and increase inter-cultural understanding. As children become familiar with normative values couched in ethical dialogue, they are immersed in ideals of reciprocity and empathy. Such dialogues can become effective (...)
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  44. Philosophy for Teachers – Developing New Teachers’ Applied Ethical Decision-Making.Janet Orchard, Ruth Heilbronn & Carrie Winstanley - 2016 - Ethics and Education 11 (1):42-54.
    Teaching, irrespective of its geographical location, is fundamentally a relational practice in which unique ethically complex situations arise to which teachers need to respond at different levels of ethical decision-making. These range from ‘big’ abstract questions about whether or not what they teach is inherently good, through to seemingly trivial questions about everyday issues, for example whether or not it is right to silence children in classrooms. Hence, alongside a wide range of pedagogical skills, new teachers also need to develop (...)
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  45. Exploring the Connections Between Philosophy for Children and Character Education: Some Implications for Moral Education?Andrew Peterson & Brendan Bentley - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 2 (2).
    In this paper we are interested in the connections between Philosophy for Children and character education. In sketching these connections we suggest some areas where the relationship is potentially fruitful, particularly in light of research which suggests that in practice schools and teachers often adopt and mix different approaches to values education. We outline some implications of drawing connections between the two fields for moral education. The arguments made in this article are done so in the hope of encouraging further (...)
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  46. Values Education in Schools: A Resource Book for Student Inquiry. [REVIEW]Michael Pritchard - 2009 - Thinking: The Journal of Philosophy for Children 19 (4):43-45.
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  47. Moral Philosophy for Children and Character Education.Michael S. Pritchard - 2000 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 14 (1):13-26.
    This paper discusses the growing prominence of character education and the role moral philosophy can play here. It examines the place of inquiry in character education, and the ways in which moral philosophy can help young people to develop the virtue of reasonableness. Reasonableness, as herein described, takes into account the views and feelings of others, the willingness to allow one’s views to be scrutinized by others, and the acceptance of some degree of uncertainty about whether one’s views are necessarily (...)
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  48. Friendship and Moral Education Twin Pillars of Philosophy for Children.Ronald F. Reed & Tony W. Johnson - 1999
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  49. Avoiding 'Passive Empathy' with Philosophy for Children.Matthew Schertz - 2007 - Journal of Moral Education 36 (2):185-198.
    This essay begins by addressing concerns raised by Megan Boler regarding empathy's conceptual ambiguities and pedagogical effectiveness. This will be followed by a call for a systematic pedagogical approach to educating for empathy based on dialogue. I will argue that in order to be effective, empathic pedagogy should provide students with a means of engaging across the boundaries of the subject by allowing for peer-mediated inquiry-based interactions that support the sharing of affective states. Finally, I will argue that Community of (...)
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  50. Action Learning and Moral Philosophy with Children.David A. Shapiro - 2000 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 14 (1):27-33.
    This paper suggests that young people can explore moral philosophy in ways that will help them both think and act in ways that are consistent with good moral reasoning. It describes several games and exercises that allow children to explore various moral principles in their behavior toward others. Participating in activities that give children practice in making moral decisions helps them to appreciate the role of principles in moral reasoning. The author contends that it is important for young people to (...)
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