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  1. Group Argumentation Development Through Philosophical Dialogues for Persons with Acquired Brain Injuries.Ylva Backman, Teodor Gardelli, Viktor Gardelli & Caroline Strömberg - 2020 - International Journal of Disability, Development and Education 67 (1):107-123.
    The high prevalence of brain injury incidents in adolescence and adulthood demands effective models for re-learning lost cognitive abilities. Impairment in brain injury survivors’ higher-level cognitive functions is common and a negative predictor for long-term outcome. We conducted two small-scale interventions (N = 12; 33.33% female) with persons with acquired brain injuries in two municipalities in Sweden. Age ranged from 17 to 65 years (M = 51.17, SD = 14.53). The interventions were dialogic, inquiry-based, and inspired by the Philosophy for (...)
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  2. Practising Philosophy of Mathematics with Children.Elisa Bezençon - 2020 - Philosophy of Mathematics Education Journal 36.
    This article examines the possibility of philosophizing about mathematics with children. It aims at outlining the nature of the practice of philosophy of mathematics with children in a mainly theoretical and exploratory way. First, an attempt at a definition is proposed. Second, I suggest some reasons that might motivate such a practice. My thesis is that one can identify an intrinsic as well as two extrinsic goals of philosophizing about mathematics with children. The intrinsic goal is related to a presumed (...)
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  3. Youth Philosophy Conferences and the Development of Adolescent Social Skills.Jane Gatley, Elliott Woodhouse & Joshua Forstenzer - 2020 - Precollege Philosophy and Public Practice 1 (2):107-125.
    In this paper we present an empirical case study into the effects of attending a philosophy conference on social skill development in 15- to 18-year-old students. We focus on the impact that the conference had on their communication skills, sociability, cooperation and teamwork skills, self-confidence, determination, social responsibility, and empathy. These are social skills previously studied in 2017 by Siddiqui et al. who found student development in these areas as a result of Philosophy for Children (P4C) sessions in primary schools. (...)
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  4. The Utah Lyceum: Cultivating "Reasonableness" in Southwest Utah.Kristopher G. Phillips & Gracia Allen - 2020 - In Claire Katz (ed.), Growing Up with Philosophy Camp. Lanham, MD 20706, USA: pp. 111-120.
    In this chapter we discuss the role of what we call "reasonableness" in a philosophy summer camp held at Southern Utah University. "Reasonableness," as we call it, is a more narrowly prescribed form of rationality - indeed one can be rational but unreasonable, but not the other way around. We discuss the importance and value of introducing philosophy to students before they get to college, and describe some of the challenges we face in introducing students in SW Utah to philosophy.
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  5. How Doing Philosophy with Children Enhances Proprioception of Thinking and Emotional Intelligence.Maria daVenza Tillmanns - 2020 - Socium I Vlast’ 1 (81):90-95.
    The article is a more detailed consideration of the problems that were outlined in the first part of this study, “The Application of the Proprioception of Thinking in Doing Philosophy with Children” (Socium and Power, 2019, no. 4). This time, the author pays attention to the characterization of thinking as a process in the practice of philosophizing with children, justifying the effectiveness of this practice, which forms the awareness of actions and develops emotional intelligence. The author contrasts static abstract thinking (...)
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  6. Philosophy and the Curriculum.Monica Bini, Alan Tapper, Peter Ellerton, Stephan John Millett & Sue Knight - 2019 - In Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton (eds.), Philosophical Inquiry with Children. Abingdon, UK: Routledge. pp. 156-171.
    Philosophy in schools in Australia dates back to the 1980s and is rooted in the Philosophy for Children curriculum and pedagogy. Seeing potential for educational change, Australian advocates were quick to develop new classroom resources and innovative programs that have proved influential in educational practice throughout Australia and internationally. Behind their contributions lie key philosophical and educational discussions and controversies which have shaped attempts to introduce philosophy in schools and embed it in state and national curricula. Drawing together a wide (...)
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  7. Australian Research Into the Benefits of Philosophy for Children.Stephan John Millett, Alan Tapper & Rosie Scholl - 2019 - In Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton (eds.), Philosophical Inquiry with Children. Abingdon, UK: Routledge. pp. 199-214.
  8. The Kids Are Alright: Philosophical Dialogue and the Utah Lyceum.Kristopher G. Phillips - 2019 - Precollege Philosophy and Public Practice 1:42-57.
    This paper serves as a call to philosophers both to create more precollege philosophy programs, and to push back against the instrumentalization of the value of philosophy. I do not intend to defend the intrinsic value of philosophy in this paper, though in an indirect way I will offer a defense of the value of precollege philosophy. I discuss the history, theory and practice behind the Utah Lyceum, a precollege philosophy summer camp program I helped create in rural Utah. I (...)
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  9. Review of the book: E.D. Bakulina, A.V. Yablokov. Magical bracelet. Moscow, Detskaya Literatura, 1971. [REVIEW]Andrej Poleev - 2019 - Enzymes 17.
    Рецензия на книгу: Э.Д. Бакулина, А.В. Яблоков. Волшебный браслет. Москва, Детская литература, 1971 г.
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  10. Dialogues of a Weird Kid.Brent Silby - 2019 - Amazon.
    This book is an introduction to philosophy presented in the dialogue style used by the historic philosopher, Plato. Set in a fictional middle school, the protagonist, Sophia, engages in philosophical dialogue with her teachers and fellow students. At the end of each dialogue, a short chapter explains the logical structure of the conversation that has taken place. This book can therefore be used either as entertainment or as a learning resource by parents and teachers to develop rational thinking in children. (...)
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  11. A Skill-Based Framework for Teaching Morality and Religion.Jason D. Swartwood - 2019 - Teaching Ethics 18 (1):39-62.
    One important aim of moral philosophy courses is to help students build the skills necessary to make their own well-reasoned decisions about moral issues. This includes the skill of determining when a particular moral reason provides a good answer to a moral question or not. Helping students think critically about religious reasons like “because God says so” and “because scripture explicitly says so” can be challenging because such lessons can be misperceived as coercive or anti-religious. I describe a framework for (...)
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  12. Aporia and Picture Books.Maria daVenza Tillmanns - 2019 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 39 (2):11-22.
    Here is an example using a picture book story: A New House, in Grasshopper on the Road: by Arnold Lobel Grasshopper sees an apple on top of a hill and decides, yum! lunch, as he takes a big bite out of the apple. This, however, causes the apple to start rolling down the hill. Grasshopper hears a voice inside the apple, telling him to keep his house from being destroyed as it is rolling down the hill. My bathtub is in (...)
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  13. The Routledge International Handbook of Philosophy for Children. Edited by Maughn Rollins Gregory, Joanna Haynes and Karin Murris. Pp 266. London: Routledge. 2017. £140.00 . ISBN 978-1-138-84767-5. [REVIEW]Claire Cassidy - 2018 - British Journal of Educational Studies 66 (1):127-129.
  14. In Community of Inquiry with Ann Margaret Sharp: Childhood, Philosophy and Education.Maughn Rollins Gregory & Megan Laverty (eds.) - 2018 - London, UK: Routledge.
    In close collaboration with the late Matthew Lipman, Ann Margaret Sharp pioneered the theory and practice of ‘the community of philosophical inquiry’ (CPI) as a way of practicing ‘Philosophy for Children’ and prepared thousands of philosophers and teachers throughout the world in this practice. In Community of Inquiry with Ann Margaret Sharp represents a long-awaited and much-needed anthology of Sharp’s insightful and influential scholarship, bringing her enduring legacy to new generations of academics, postgraduate students and researchers in the fields of (...)
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  15. The Routledge International Handbook of Philosophy for Children.Maughn Rollins Gregory, Joanna Haynes & Karin Murris (eds.) - 2017 - London, UK: Routledge.
    This rich and diverse collection offers a range of perspectives and practices of Philosophy for Children (P4C). P4C has become a significant educational and philosophical movement with growing impact on schools and educational policy. Its community of inquiry pedagogy has been taken up in community, adult, higher, further and informal educational settings around the world. The internationally sourced chapters offer research findings as well as insights into debates provoked by bringing children’s voices into moral and political arenas and to philosophy (...)
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  16. On the Seam: Philosophy with Palestinian Girls in an East Jerusalem Village as a Pedagogy of Searching.Arie Kizel & Marlene Abdallah - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 4 (1):27 - 49.
    The ‘Marwa’ elementary school (pseudonym) – an Israeli public school on the border between Israel and the Palestinian Authority – is a unique educational institution in that, despite being not religious, it only accepts from Grade 1 through to Grade 6 girls. Several years ago, the principal decided to implement a Philosophy with Children (PwC) programme as an alternative pedagogy. This paper surveys how the educational faculty regarded the introduction of this curriculum and how it contributed towards the development of (...)
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  17. Philosophy in Schools.Felicity Haynes (ed.) - 2016 - Routledge.
    In 1972, Matthew Lipman founded the Institute of Advancement for Philosophy for Children, producing a series of novels and teaching manuals promoting philosophical inquiry at all levels of schooling. The programme consisted of stories about children discussing traditional topics of ethics, values, logic, reality, perception, and politics, as they related to their own daily experiences. Philosophy for Children has been adapted beyond the IAPC texts, but the process remains one of an open community of inquiry in which teachers promote respect, (...)
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  18. Thinking as a Community: Reasonableness and Emotions.Dina Mendonça & Magda Costa Carvalho - 2016 - In Maughn Rollins Gregory, Karin Murris & Joanna Haynes (eds.), The Routledge International Handbook of Philosophy for Children. New York: Routledge. pp. 127-134.
    Reasonableness is a core normative concept in Philosophy for Children (P4C), an inquiry model of education that bridges reasoning, feeling and acting within a community. The concept of reasonableness dates back to Aristotle’s ethical notion of phronesis (1141b), and extends to logical (Gewirth 1983), social and political concerns of major contemporary thinkers (Rawls 2001; Rorty 2001). The development of the concept of reasonableness in P4C was part of the reconceptualization of rationality toward the end of the twentieth century, since Lipman (...)
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  19. Socrates in the Schools From Scotland to Texas: Replicating a Study on the Effects of a Philosophy for Children Program.Frank Fair, Lory E. Haas, Carol Gardosik, Daphne D. Johnson, Debra P. Price & Olena Leipnik - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 2 (1):18-37.
    In this article we report the findings of a randomised control clinical trial that assessed the impact of a Philosophy for Children program and replicated a previous study conducted in Scotland by Topping and Trickey. A Cognitive Abilities Test was administered as a pretest and a posttest to randomly selected experimental groups and control groups. The students in the experimental group engaged in philosophy lessons in a setting of structured, collaborative inquiry in their language arts classes for one hour per (...)
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  20. “Life Goes on Even If There’s a Gravestone”: Philosophy with Children and Adolescents on Virtual Memorial Sites.Arie Kizel - 2014 - Childhood and Philosophy 10 (20):421-443.
    All over the Internet, many websites operate dealing with collective and personal memory. The sites relevant to collective memory deal with structuring the memory of social groups and they comprise part of “civil religion”. The sites that deal with personal memory memorialize people who have died and whose family members or friends or other members of their community have an interest in preserving their memory. This article offers an analysis of an expanded philosophical discourse that took place over a two-year (...)
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  21. A Way to Philosophy.Eva Brann - 2012 - Teaching Philosophy Today 6 (3-4):147-158.
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  22. Cultivating Creativity and Self-Reflective Thinking Through Dialogic Teacher Education.Arie Kizel - 2012 - US-China Education Review 2 (2):237 – 249.
    A new program of teacher training in a dialogical spirit in order to prepare them towards working in the field of philosophy with children combines cultivating creativity and self-reflective thinking had been operated as a part of cooperation between the academia and the education system in Israel. This article describes the program that is a part of their practice towards co-operation between academia and schools as a part of PDS (Professional Development Schools) partnership. The program fosters creativity and self-reflective thinking (...)
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  23. Transforming Thinking: Philosophical Inquiry in the Primary and Secondary Classroom.Catherine C. McCall - 2009 - Routledge.
    The origins and development of community of philosophical inquiry -- The theoretical landscape -- Philosophising with five year olds -- Creating a community of philosophical inquiry (CoPI) with all ages -- Different methods of group philosophical discussion -- What you need to know to chair a CoPI with six to sixteen year olds -- Implementing CoPI in primary and secondary schools -- CoPI, citizenship, moral virtue, and academic performance with primary and secondary children.
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  24. On the Notion of Good Reasons in Philosophy for Children.Diego Antonio Pineda - 2009 - Childhood and Philosophy 5 (10):317-338.
    The reasonableness is a basic ideal of a philosophical education. Such ideal is especially expressed in “Philosophy for Children” by the notion, still open to multiple interpretations, of “good reasons”. “Being reasonable” means, in its widest sense, the trend, the finely cultivated habit, of giving, asking and evaluating reasons for our thoughts, feelings, actions, words, actions, or wishes. What is demanded of those who participate in a community of inquiry is the permanent effort of searching for the best reasons for (...)
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  25. Children as Philosophers: Learning Through Enquiry and Dialogue in the Primary Classroom.Joanna Haynes - 2008 - Routledge.
    This fully revised second edition suggests ways in which you can introduce philosophical enquiry to your Personal, Social and Health Education and Citizenship teaching and across the curriculum.
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  26. Introduction: Philosophy for Children and/as Philosophical Practice.Megan Laverty - 2004 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 18 (2):141-151.
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  27. Thinking in Education.Matthew Lipman - 2003 - British Journal of Educational Studies 51 (3):303-305.
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  28. Introduction.Maughn Gregory & David Kennedy - 2000 - Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines 19 (2):4-10.
  29. Can Children Do Philosophy?Karin Murris - 2000 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 34 (2):261–279.
    Some philosophers claim that young children cannot do philosophy. This paper examines some of those claims, and puts forward arguments against them. Our beliefs that children cannot do philosophy are based on philosophical assumptions about children, their thinking and about philosophy. Many of those assumptions remain unquestioned by critics of Philosophy with Children. My conclusion is that the idea that very young children can do philosophy has not only significant consequences for how we should educate young children, but also for (...)
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  30. The Mill on the Floss.Megan Laverty - 1994 - Thinking: The Journal of Philosophy for Children 12 (1):47-49.
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  31. Why Philosophy for Children Now?David Kennedy - 1993 - Thinking: The Journal of Philosophy for Children 10 (3):2-6.
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  32. Studies in Philosophy for Children: Harry Stottlemeier's Discovery.Ann Margaret Sharp, Ronald F. Reed & Matthew Lipman (eds.) - 1992 - Temple University Press.
    In this first part, Matthew Lipman offers the reader a glimpse at the thought processes that resulted in Philosophy for Children and, in so doing, ...
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  33. Philosophy for Children and Critical Thinking.Matthew Lipman - 1988 - Thinking: The Journal of Philosophy for Children 7 (4):40-42.
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  34. Philosophy Goes to School.Matthew Lipman - 1988 - Temple University Press.
    Author note: Matthew Lipman, Professor of Philosophy at Montclair State College and Director of the Institute for the Advancement of Philosophy for Children, is ...
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  35. Encouraging Children to Be Thoughtful Questions and Answers : A Dialogue with Dr. Matthew Lipman.George Ghanotakis, Matthew Lipman & Canadian Institute of Philosophy for Children - 1987 - Canadian Institute of Philosophy for Children.
  36. Philosophy for Children and Its Critics — Going Beyond the Information Given.Tony W. Johnson - 1987 - Educational Theory 37 (1):61-68.
  37. Reasoning Skills.Dale Cannon & Mark Weinstein - 1985 - Thinking: The Journal of Philosophy for Children 6 (1):29-33.
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  38. Philosophy and the Cultivation of Reasoning.Matthew Lipman - 1985 - Thinking: The Journal of Philosophy for Children 5 (4):33-41.
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  39. Philosophical Adventures with Children.Michael S. Pritchard - 1985
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  40. A Way to Philosophy.Eva Brann - 1984 - Thinking: The Journal of Philosophy for Children 5 (2):6-12.
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  41. Dialogues with Children.Gareth B. Matthews - 1984 - Harvard University Press.
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  42. Philosophy for Children.Matthew Lipman - 1982 - Thinking: The Journal of Philosophy for Children 3 (3-4):35-44.
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  43. Growing Up with Philosophy.Matthew Lipman & Ann Margaret Sharp (eds.) - 1978 - Temple University Press.
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  44. Reason and Teaching.Felicity Haynes - 1975 - Teaching Philosophy 1 (1):91-95.
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  45. The Atheist and the Agnostic.Brent Silby - manuscript
    This Socratic dialogue pitched at introductory philosophy students examines the question of God's existence from atheist and agnostic perspectives.
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