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Summary

The philosophy of artificial intelligence is a collection of issues primarily concerned with whether or not AI is possible -- with whether or not it is possible to build an intelligent thinking machine.  Also of concern is whether humans and other animals are best thought of as machines (computational robots, say) themselves. The most important of the "whether-possible" problems lie at the intersection of theories of the semantic contents of thought and the nature of computation. A second suite of problems surrounds the nature of rationality. A third suite revolves around the seeming “transcendent” reasoning powers of the human mind. These problems derive from Kurt Gödel's famous Incompleteness Theorem.  A fourth collection of problems concerns the architecture of an intelligent machine.  Should a thinking computer use discrete or continuous modes of computing and representing, is having a body necessary, and is being conscious necessary.  This takes us to the final set of questions. Can a computer be conscious?  Can a computer have a moral sense? Would we have duties to thinking computers, to robots?  For example, is it moral for humans to even attempt to build an intelligent machine?  If we did build such a machine, would turning it off be the equivalent of murder?  If we had a race of such machines, would it be immoral to force them to work for us?

Key works Probably the most important attack on whether AI is possible is John Searle's famous Chinese Room Argument: Searle 1980.  This attack focuses on the semantic aspects (mental semantics) of thoughts, thinking, and computing.   For some replies to this argument, see the same 1980 journal issue as Searle's original paper.  For the problem of the nature of rationality, see Pylyshyn 1987.  An especially strong attack on AI from this angle is Jerry Fodor's work on the frame problem: Fodor 1987.  On the frame problem in general, see McCarthy & Hayes 1969.  For some replies to Fodor and advances on the frame problem, see Ford & Pylyshyn 1996.  For the transcendent reasoning issue, a central and important paper is Hilary Putnam's Putnam 1960.  This paper is arguably the source for the computational turn in 1960s-70s philosophy of mind.  For architecture-of-mind issues, see, for starters: M. Spivey's The Contintuity of Mind, Oxford, which argues against the notion of discrete representations. See also, Gelder & Port 1995.  For an argument for discrete representations, see, Dietrich & Markman 2003.  For an argument that the mind's boundaries do not end at the body's boundaries, see, Clark & Chalmers 1998.  For a statement of and argument for computationalism -- the thesis that the mind is a kind of computer -- see Shimon Edelman's excellent book Edelman 2008. See also Chapter 9 of Chalmers's book Chalmers 1996.
Introductions Chinese Room Argument: Searle 1980. Frame problem: Fodor 1987, Computationalism and Godelian style refutation: Putnam 1960. Architecture: M. Spivey's The Contintuity of Mind, Oxford and Shimon Edelman's Edelman 2008. Ethical issues: Anderson & Anderson 2011 and Müller 2020.  Conscious computers: Chalmers 2011.
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  1. Attention-based convolutional neural network for Bangla sentiment analysis.Sadia Sharmin & Danial Chakma - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-16.
    With the accelerated evolution of the internet in the form of web-sites, social networks, microblogs, and online portals, a large number of reviews, opinions, recommendations, ratings, and feedback are generated by writers or users. This user-generated sentiment content can be about books, people, hotels, products, research, events, etc. These sentiments become very beneficial for businesses, governments, and individuals. While this content is meant to be useful, a bulk of this writer-generated content requires using text mining techniques and sentiment analysis. However, (...)
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  2. A taxonomy of human–machine collaboration: capturing automation and technical autonomy.Monika Simmler & Ruth Frischknecht - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-12.
    Due to the ongoing advancements in technology, socio-technical collaboration has become increasingly prevalent. This poses challenges in terms of governance and accountability, as well as issues in various other fields. Therefore, it is crucial to familiarize decision-makers and researchers with the core of human–machine collaboration. This study introduces a taxonomy that enables identification of the very nature of human–machine interaction. A literature review has revealed that automation and technical autonomy are main parameters for describing and understanding such interaction. Both aspects (...)
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  3. Legal Dilemmas of Estonian Artificial Intelligence Strategy: In Between of E-Society and Global Race.Tanel Kerikmäe & Evelin Pärn-Lee - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-12.
    Estonia has successfully created a digital society within the past 2 decades. It is best known for its eGovernment achievements, but it is also home for four unicorn star-ups. While the state is aiming to attract tech investments with e-Residency program and has recently started to invest into protecting national IP and safeguarding data from cybercrime by applying blockchain technology and creating its “digital embassy” in Luxembourg, emerging technologies such as and applications of artificial intelligence but also internet of things (...)
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  4. From machine ethics to computational ethics.Samuel T. Segun - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-14.
    Research into the ethics of artificial intelligence is often categorized into two subareas—robot ethics and machine ethics. Many of the definitions and classifications of the subject matter of these subfields, as found in the literature, are conflated, which I seek to rectify. In this essay, I infer that using the term ‘machine ethics’ is too broad and glosses over issues that the term computational ethics best describes. I show that the subject of inquiry of computational ethics is of great value (...)
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  5. Analysing the Combined Health, Social and Economic Impacts of the Corovanvirus Pandemic Using Agent-Based Social Simulation.Frank Dignum, Virginia Dignum, Paul Davidsson, Amineh Ghorbani, Mijke van der Hurk, Maarten Jensen, Christian Kammler, Fabian Lorig, Luis Gustavo Ludescher, Alexander Melchior, René Mellema, Cezara Pastrav, Loïs Vanhee & Harko Verhagen - 2020 - Minds and Machines 30 (2):177-194.
    During the COVID-19 crisis there have been many difficult decisions governments and other decision makers had to make. E.g. do we go for a total lock down or keep schools open? How many people and which people should be tested? Although there are many good models from e.g. epidemiologists on the spread of the virus under certain conditions, these models do not directly translate into the interventions that can be taken by government. Neither can these models contribute to understand the (...)
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  6. The Ethical Governance of the Digital During and After the COVID-19 Pandemic.Mariarosaria Taddeo - 2020 - Minds and Machines 30 (2):171-176.
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  7. A Normative Approach to Artificial Moral Agency.Dorna Behdadi & Christian Munthe - 2020 - Minds and Machines 30 (2):195-218.
    This paper proposes a methodological redirection of the philosophical debate on artificial moral agency in view of increasingly pressing practical needs due to technological development. This “normative approach” suggests abandoning theoretical discussions about what conditions may hold for moral agency and to what extent these may be met by artificial entities such as AI systems and robots. Instead, the debate should focus on how and to what extent such entities should be included in human practices normally assuming moral agency and (...)
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  8. Moral Gridworlds: A Theoretical Proposal for Modeling Artificial Moral Cognition.Julia Haas - 2020 - Minds and Machines 30 (2):219-246.
    I describe a suite of reinforcement learning environments in which artificial agents learn to value and respond to moral content and contexts. I illustrate the core principles of the framework by characterizing one such environment, or “gridworld,” in which an agent learns to trade-off between monetary profit and fair dealing, as applied in a standard behavioral economic paradigm. I then highlight the core technical and philosophical advantages of the learning approach for modeling moral cognition, and for addressing the so-called value (...)
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  9. Towards the Ethical Publication of Country of Origin Information (COI) in the Asylum Process.Nikita Aggarwal & Luciano Floridi - 2020 - Minds and Machines 30 (2):247-257.
    This article addresses the question of how ‘Country of Origin Information’ reports—that is, research developed and used to support decision-making in the asylum process—can be published in an ethical manner. The article focuses on the risk that published COI reports could be misused and thereby harm the subjects of the reports and/or those involved in their development. It supports a situational approach to assessing data ethics when publishing COI reports, whereby COI service providers must weigh up the benefits and harms (...)
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  10. The Abstraction/Representation Account of Computation and Subjective Experience.Jochen Szangolies - 2020 - Minds and Machines 30 (2):259-299.
    I examine the abstraction/representation theory of computation put forward by Horsman et al., connecting it to the broader notion of modeling, and in particular, model-based explanation, as considered by Rosen. I argue that the ‘representational entities’ it depends on cannot themselves be computational, and that, in particular, their representational capacities cannot be realized by computational means, and must remain explanatorily opaque to them. I then propose that representation might be realized by subjective experience, through being the bearer of the structure (...)
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  11. Hybrid collective intelligence in a human–AI society.Marieke M. M. Peeters, Jurriaan van Diggelen, Karel van den Bosch, Adelbert Bronkhorst, Mark A. Neerincx, Jan Maarten Schraagen & Stephan Raaijmakers - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-22.
    Within current debates about the future impact of Artificial Intelligence on human society, roughly three different perspectives can be recognised: the technology-centric perspective, claiming that AI will soon outperform humankind in all areas, and that the primary threat for humankind is superintelligence; the human-centric perspective, claiming that humans will always remain superior to AI when it comes to social and societal aspects, and that the main threat of AI is that humankind’s social nature is overlooked in technological designs; and the (...)
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  12. Eric T. Meyer and Ralph Schroeder: Knowledge Machines: Digital Transformations of the Sciences and Humanities.Stacey O. Irwin - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-3.
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  13. Disengagement with Ethics in Robotics as a Tacit Form of Dehumanisation.Karolina Zawieska - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-15.
    Over the past two decades, ethical challenges related to robotics technologies have gained increasing interest among different research and non-academic communities, in particular through the field of roboethics. While the reasons to address roboethics are clear, why not to engage with ethics needs to be better understood. This paper focuses on a limited or lacking engagement with ethics that takes place within some parts of the robotics community and its implications for the conceptualisation of the human being. The underlying assumption (...)
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  14. Things That Help Out: Designing Smart Wearables as Partners in Stress Management.Xueliang Li, Marco C. Rozendaal, Kaspar Jansen, Catholijn Jonker & Eric Vermetten - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-11.
    We propose an approach to designing smart wearables that act as partners to help people cope with stress in daily life. Our approach contributes to the developing field of smart wearables by addressing how technological capabilities can be designed to establish partnerships that consider the person, the situation, and the appropriate type of support. As such, this study also contributes to healthcare by opening up novel technology-supported routes to stress treatment and care. We present the results of a phenomenological study (...)
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  15. Kai-Fu-Lee (2019): AI Superpowers—China, Silicon Valley and the New World Order.Bárbara Jennifer Paz - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-2.
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  16. Romele, Alberto (2020): Digital Hermeneutics: Philosophical Investigations in New Media and Technologies.Wessel Reijers - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-4.
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  17. The Chinese approach to artificial intelligence: an analysis of policy, ethics, and regulation.Huw Roberts, Josh Cowls, Jessica Morley, Mariarosaria Taddeo, Vincent Wang & Luciano Floridi - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-19.
    In July 2017, China’s State Council released the country’s strategy for developing artificial intelligence, entitled ‘New Generation Artificial Intelligence Development Plan’. This strategy outlined China’s aims to become the world leader in AI by 2030, to monetise AI into a trillion-yuan industry, and to emerge as the driving force in defining ethical norms and standards for AI. Several reports have analysed specific aspects of China’s AI policies or have assessed the country’s technical capabilities. Instead, in this article, we focus on (...)
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  18. On the Moral Status of Social Robots: Considering the Consciousness Criterion.Kestutis Mosakas - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-15.
    While philosophers have been debating for decades on whether different entities—including severely disabled human beings, embryos, animals, objects of nature, and even works of art—can legitimately be considered as having moral status, this question has gained a new dimension in the wake of artificial intelligence. One of the more imminent concerns in the context of AI is that of the moral rights and status of social robots, such as robotic caregivers and artificial companions, that are built to interact with human (...)
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  19. Robotic Ai, Crispr, and Free Will.Arthur C. Petersen - 2020 - Zygon 55 (2):283-285.
  20. AI&Society: Editorial Volume 35.2: The Trappings of AI Agency.Karamjit S. Gill - 2020 - AI and Society 35 (2):289-296.
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  21. Why Friendly AIs Won’T Be That Friendly: A Friendly Reply to Muehlhauser and Bostrom.Robert James M. Boyles & Jeremiah Joven Joaquin - 2020 - AI and Society 35 (2):505-507.
    In “Why We Need Friendly AI”, Luke Muehlhauser and Nick Bostrom propose that for our species to survive the impending rise of superintelligent AIs, we need to ensure that they would be human-friendly. This discussion note offers a more natural but bleaker outlook: that in the end, if these AIs do arise, they won’t be that friendly.
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  22. The greatest epistemological externalisation: reflecting on the puzzling direction we are heading to through algorithmic automatisation.Simona Chiodo - 2020 - AI and Society 35 (2):431-440.
    The aim of the article is reflecting on a fundamental epistemological issue which characterises our present technological progress: where are we heading to, as humankind, while we are progressively externalising our most crucial decision processes towards algorithms, from which decisive data, coming from human experience and mind, are left out? By reflecting on some cases, I shall try to argue that the most puzzling issue which engineers and philosophers should be aware that they have to jointly challenge may be that (...)
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  23. God-Like Robots: The Semantic Overlap Between Representation of Divine and Artificial Entities.Nicolas Spatola & Karolina Urbanska - 2020 - AI and Society 35 (2):329-341.
    Artificial intelligence and robots may progressively take a more and more prominent place in our daily environment. Interestingly, in the study of how humans perceive these artificial entities, science has mainly taken an anthropocentric perspective. Considering people’s fears and expectations from robots and artificial intelligence, they tend to be simultaneously afraid and allured to them, much as they would be to the conceptualisations related to the divine entities. In two experiments, we investigated the proximity of representation between artificial entities, divine (...)
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  24. Smart Sankey Picturization for Energy Management Systems in India.Anant Chandra & Satyajit Ghosh - 2020 - AI and Society 35 (2):401-407.
    India’s energy demand is predicted to rise by 135% within a span of 20 years. Coping up with surging energy demands requires several reforms in both renewable and non-renewable sectors. Factors such as rising population, reduction in the cost of renewable energy technology and their effect on the nation’s GDP, can make policy making a herculean task and the justification for such policies, quite opaque to the public. Artificial Intelligence technology can help decision makers to quickly draw conclusions from voluminous (...)
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  25. Legal Personhood for Artificial Intelligence: Citizenship as the Exception to the Rule.Tyler L. Jaynes - 2020 - AI and Society 35 (2):343-354.
    The concept of artificial intelligence is not new nor is the notion that it should be granted legal protections given its influence on human activity. What is new, on a relative scale, is the notion that artificial intelligence can possess citizenship—a concept reserved only for humans, as it presupposes the idea of possessing civil duties and protections. Where there are several decades’ worth of writing on the concept of the legal status of computational artificial artefacts in the USA and elsewhere, (...)
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  26. Movie Films Consumption in Brazil: An Analysis of Support Vector Machine Classification.Marislei Nishijima, Nathalia Nieuwenhoff, Ricardo Pires & Patrícia R. Oliveira - 2020 - AI and Society 35 (2):451-457.
    We employ the support vector machine classifier, over different types of kernels, to investigate whether observable variables of individuals and their household information are able to describe their consumption decision of film at theaters in Brazil. Using a very big dataset of 340,000 individuals living in metropolitan areas of a whole large developing economy, we performed a Knowledge Discovery in Databases to classify the film consumers, which results in 80% instances correctly classified. To reduce the degrees of freedom for SVM (...)
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  27. E-MIIM: an ensemble-learning-based context-aware mobile telephony model for intelligent interruption management.Iqbal H. Sarker, A. S. M. Kayes, Md Hasan Furhad, Mohammad Mainul Islam & Md Shohidul Islam - 2020 - AI and Society 35 (2):459-467.
    Nowadays, mobile telephony interruptions in our daily life activities are common because of the inappropriate ringing notifications of incoming phone calls in different contexts. Such interruptions may impact on the work attention not only for the mobile phone owners, but also for the surrounding people. Decision tree is the most popular machine-learning classification technique that is used in existing context-aware mobile intelligent interruption management model to overcome such issues. However, a single-decision tree-based context-aware model may cause over-fitting problem and thus (...)
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  28. Can artificial intelligency revolutionize drug discovery?Jean-Louis Kraus - 2020 - AI and Society 35 (2):501-504.
    Artificial intelligency can bring speed and reliability to drug discovery process. It represents an additional intelligence, which in any case can replace the strategic and logic creative insight of the medicinal chemist who remains the architect and molecule master designer. In terms of drug design, artificial intelligency, deep learning machines, and other revolutionary technologies will match with the medicinal chemist’s natural intelligency, but for sure never go beyond. This manuscript tries to assess the impact of the artificial intelligency on drug (...)
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  29. Presenting a hybrid model in social networks recommendation system architecture development.Abolfazl Zare, Mohammad Reza Motadel & Aliakbar Jalali - 2020 - AI and Society 35 (2):469-483.
    There are many studies conducted on recommendation systems, most of which are focused on recommending items to users and vice versa. Nowadays, social networks are complicated due to carrying vast arrays of data about individuals and organizations. In today’s competitive environment, companies face two significant problems: supplying resources and attracting new customers. Even the concept of supply-chain management in a virtual environment is changed. In this article, we propose a new and innovative combination approach to recommend organizational people in social (...)
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  30. One Robot Doesn’T Fit All: Aligning Social Robot Appearance and Job Suitability From a Middle Eastern Perspective.Jakub Złotowski, Ashraf Khalil & Salam Abdallah - 2020 - AI and Society 35 (2):485-500.
    Social robots are expected to take over a significant number of jobs in the coming decades. The present research provides the first systematic evaluation of occupation suitability of existing social robots based on user perception derived classification of them. The study was conducted in the Middle East since the views of this region are rarely considered in human–robot interaction research, although the region is poised to increasingly adopt the use of robots. Laboratory-based experimental data revealed that a robot’s appearance plays (...)
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  31. Risk Management Standards and the Active Management of Malicious Intent in Artificial Superintelligence.Patrick Bradley - 2020 - AI and Society 35 (2):319-328.
    The likely near future creation of artificial superintelligence carries significant risks to humanity. These risks are difficult to conceptualise and quantify, but malicious use of existing artificial intelligence by criminals and state actors is already occurring and poses risks to digital security, physical security and integrity of political systems. These risks will increase as artificial intelligence moves closer to superintelligence. While there is little research on risk management tools used in artificial intelligence development, the current global standard for risk management, (...)
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  32. Black-Box Artificial Intelligence: An Epistemological and Critical Analysis.Manuel Carabantes - 2020 - AI and Society 35 (2):309-317.
    The artificial intelligence models with machine learning that exhibit the best predictive accuracy, and therefore, the most powerful ones, are, paradoxically, those with the most opaque black-box architectures. At the same time, the unstoppable computerization of advanced industrial societies demands the use of these machines in a growing number of domains. The conjunction of both phenomena gives rise to a control problem on AI that in this paper we analyze by dividing the issue into two. First, we carry out an (...)
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  33. The race for an artificial general intelligence: implications for public policy.Wim Naudé & Nicola Dimitri - 2020 - AI and Society 35 (2):367-379.
    An arms race for an artificial general intelligence would be detrimental for and even pose an existential threat to humanity if it results in an unfriendly AGI. In this paper, an all-pay contest model is developed to derive implications for public policy to avoid such an outcome. It is established that, in a winner-takes-all race, where players must invest in R&D, only the most competitive teams will participate. Thus, given the difficulty of AGI, the number of competing teams is unlikely (...)
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  34. AI and the path to envelopment: knowledge as a first step towards the responsible regulation and use of AI-powered machines.Scott Robbins - 2020 - AI and Society 35 (2):391-400.
    With Artificial Intelligence entering our lives in novel ways—both known and unknown to us—there is both the enhancement of existing ethical issues associated with AI as well as the rise of new ethical issues. There is much focus on opening up the ‘black box’ of modern machine-learning algorithms to understand the reasoning behind their decisions—especially morally salient decisions. However, some applications of AI which are no doubt beneficial to society rely upon these black boxes. Rather than requiring algorithms to be (...)
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  35. Culture, the process of knowledge, perception of the world and emergence of AI.Badrudin Amershi - 2020 - AI and Society 35 (2):417-430.
    Considering the technological development today, we are facing an emerging crisis. We are in the midst of a scientific revolution, which promises to radically change not only the way we live and work—but beyond that challenge the stability of the very foundations of our civilization and the international political order. All our attention and effort is thus focused on cushioning its impacts on life and society. Looking back in history, it would be pertinent to ask whether this process is a (...)
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  36. 15 Challenges for AI: Or What AI (Currently) Can’T Do.Thilo Hagendorff & Katharina Wezel - 2020 - AI and Society 35 (2):355-365.
    The current “AI Summer” is marked by scientific breakthroughs and economic successes in the fields of research, development, and application of systems with artificial intelligence. But, aside from the great hopes and promises associated with artificial intelligence, there are a number of challenges, shortcomings and even limitations of the technology. For one, these challenges arise from methodological and epistemological misconceptions about the capabilities of artificial intelligence. Secondly, they result from restrictions of the social context in which the development of applications (...)
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  37. Do people with social anxiety feel anxious about interacting with a robot?Tatsuya Nomura, Takayuki Kanda, Tomohiro Suzuki & Sachie Yamada - 2020 - AI and Society 35 (2):381-390.
    To investigate whether people with social anxiety have less actual and “anticipatory” anxiety when interacting with a robot compared to interacting with a person, we conducted a 2 × 2 psychological experiment with two factors: social anxiety and interaction partner. The experiment was conducted in a counseling setting where a participant played the role of a client and the robot or the confederate played the role of a counselor. First, we measured the participants’ social anxiety using the Social Avoidance and (...)
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  38. Augmented Learning, Smart Glasses and Knowing How.Wulf Loh & Catrin Misselhorn - 2020 - AI and Society 35 (2):297-308.
    While recent studies suggest that augmented learning employing smart glasses increases overall learning performance, in this paper we are more interested in the question which repercussions ALSG will have on the type of knowledge that is acquired. Drawing from the theoretical discussion within epistemology about the differences between Knowledge-How and Knowledge-That, we will argue that ALSG furthers understanding as a series of epistemic and non-epistemic Knowing-Hows. Focusing on academic knowledge acquisition, especially with respect to early curriculum experiments in various STEM (...)
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  39. Collective Bread Diaries: Cultural Identities in an Artificial Intelligence Framework.Haytham Nawar - 2020 - AI and Society 35 (2):409-416.
    The complex relationship between the current advancement of technology, including the wide scope of settings at which machinery plays substantial roles, and the cultural, historical, and political realities that have long existed across the history of mankind, is one that deserves absolute attention and exploration. This interconnection has been investigated in light of bread, and the meaning it signifies to people from all over the world. Drawing on the commonly unnoticed value of bread, and the everlasting impregnable imprint it has (...)
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  40. Algorithmic Fairness in Mortgage Lending: From Absolute Conditions to Relational Trade-Offs.Michelle Seng Ah Lee & Luciano Floridi - forthcoming - Minds and Machines:1-27.
    To address the rising concern that algorithmic decision-making may reinforce discriminatory biases, researchers have proposed many notions of fairness and corresponding mathematical formalizations. Each of these notions is often presented as a one-size-fits-all, absolute condition; however, in reality, the practical and ethical trade-offs are unavoidable and more complex. We introduce a new approach that considers fairness—not as a binary, absolute mathematical condition—but rather, as a relational notion in comparison to alternative decisionmaking processes. Using US mortgage lending as an example use (...)
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  41. AI in the noosphere: an alignment of scientific and wisdom traditions.Stephen D. Edwards - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-3.
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  42. The datafication of the worldview.Alberto Romele - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-10.
    The goal of this article is twofold. First, it aims at sketching the outlines of material hermeneutics as a three-level analysis of technological artefacts. In the first section, we introduce Erwin Panofsky’s three levels of interpretation of an artwork, and we propose to import this approach in the field of philosophy of technology. Second, the rest of the article focuses on the third level, with a specific attention towards big data and algorithms of artificial intelligence. The thesis is that these (...)
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  43. Bio art.Eduardo Kac - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-10.
    In 1997, I introduced the concept and the phrase “bio art”, originally in relation to my artwork “Time Capsule”. This work approached the problem of wet interfaces and human hosting of digital memory through the implantation of a microchip. The work consisted of a microchip implant, seven sepia-toned photographs, a live television broadcast, a webcast, interactive telerobotic webscanning of the implant, a remote database intervention, and additional display elements, including an X-ray of the implant. While “bio art” is applicable to (...)
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  44. Digital Hermeneutics for the New Age of Cinema.Stacey O. Irwin - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-9.
    Philosophical and technoculture studies surrounding the existential understanding of the human–technology–world experience have seen a slow but steady increase that makes a turn to material hermeneutics in the second decade of the twenty-first century :35–42, 2010; Romele in Digital hermeneutics: philosophical investigations in new media and technologies. Routledge, Abingdon, 2020; among others). This renewed focus makes sense because human–technology–world experiences need to be interpreted. And many of these are more complicated to study, precisely because technology is at the root of (...)
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  45. Children’s Perceptions of Social Robots: A Study of the Robots Pepper, AV1 and Tessa at Norwegian Research Fairs.Roger Andre Søraa, Pernille Søderholm Nyvoll, Karoline Blix Grønvik & J. Artur Serrano - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-12.
    This article studies perceptual differences of three social robots by elementary school children of ages 6–13 years at research fairs. The autonomous humanoid robot Pepper, an advanced social robot primarily designed as a personal assistant with movement and mobility, is compared to the teleoperated AV1 robot—designed to help elementary school children who cannot attend school to have a telepresence through the robot—and the flowerpot robot Tessa, used in the eWare system as an avatar for a home sensor system and dedicated (...)
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  46. Those Who Do Not Move, Do Not Notice Their (Supply) Chains—Inconvenient Lessons From Disruptions Related to COVID-19.Ettore Settanni - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-7.
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  47. Machine Learning’s Limitations in Avoiding Automation of Bias.Daniel Varona, Yadira Lizama-Mue & Juan Luis Suárez - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-7.
    The use of predictive systems has become wider with the development of related computational methods, and the evolution of the sciences in which these methods are applied Solon and Selbst and Pedreschi et al.. The referred methods include machine learning techniques, face and/or voice recognition, temperature mapping, and other, within the artificial intelligence domain. These techniques are being applied to solve problems in socially and politically sensitive areas such as crime prevention and justice management, crowd management, and emotion analysis, just (...)
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  48. When is a phenomenologist being hermeneutical?Robert C. Scharff - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-15.
    Many philosophers of science and technology who see themselves as coming “after” Husserl also claim that their phenomenology is hermeneutical. Yet they neither practice the same sort of phenomenology, nor do they all have the same understanding of hermeneutics. Moreover, their differences often seem to be more a function of different pre-selected substantive commitments—say, to take a “material” turn or to be resolutely “empirical”—than the product of any serious effort to clarify what it is be hermeneutical. In this essay, after (...)
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  49. The Carousel of Ethical Machinery.Luís Moniz Pereira - forthcoming - AI and Society.
    Human beings have been aware of the risks associated with knowledge or its associated technologies since the dawn of time. Not just in Greek mythology, but in the founding myths of Judeo-Christian religions, there are signs and warnings against these dangers. Yet, such warnings and forebodings have never made as much sense as they do today. This stems from the emergence of machines capable of cognitive functions performed exclusively by humans until recently. Besides those technical problems associated with its design (...)
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  50. Bio Matter in Creative Practises for Fashion and Design.Galina Mihaleva - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-5.
    Through an examination of the bacteria that produce the cellulose, an investigation of the growing process and properties, and a discussion of an artistic exploration, one can fully grasp bio cellulose’s potential in becoming a synergist for sustainable fashion. This new creative and radical approach re-imagines the future materials for fashion and other fields requiring textile applications that are grown and renewable. Questions how textile can be created to be sustainable, biodegradable and infinitely reusable and mainly what the paradigms for (...)
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