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  1. Why is There No Successful Whole Brain Simulation ?Klaus M. Stiefel & Daniel S. Brooks - forthcoming - Biological Theory:1-9.
    With the advent of powerful parallel computers, efforts have commenced to simulate complete mammalian brains. However, so far none of these efforts has produced outcomes close to explaining even the behavioral complexities of animals. In this article, we suggest four challenges that ground this shortcoming. First, we discuss the connection between hypothesis testing and simulations. Typically, efforts to simulate complete mammalian brains lack a clear hypothesis. Second, we treat complications related to a lack of parameter constraints for large-scale simulations. To (...)
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  2. Code Biology, Peircean Biosemiotics, and Rosen’s Relational Biology.Marcello Barbieri - 2019 - Biological Theory 14 (1):21-29.
    The classical theories of the genetic code claimed that its coding rules were determined by chemistry—either by stereochemical affinities or by metabolic reactions—but the experimental evidence has revealed a totally different reality: it has shown that any codon can be associated with any amino acid, thus proving that there is no necessary link between them. The rules of the genetic code, in other words, obey the laws of physics and chemistry but are not determined by them. They are arbitrary, or (...)
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  3. The Nature of Programmed Cell Death.Pierre M. Durand & Grant Ramsey - 2019 - Biological Theory 14 (1):30-41.
    In multicellular organisms, cells are frequently programmed to die. This makes good sense: cells that fail to, or are no longer playing important roles are eliminated. From the cell’s perspective, this also makes sense, since somatic cells in multicellular organisms require the cooperation of clonal relatives. In unicellular organisms, however, programmed cell death poses a difficult and unresolved evolutionary problem. The empirical evidence for PCD in diverse microbial taxa has spurred debates about what precisely PCD means in the case of (...)
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  4. Task Allocation and the Logic of Research Questions: How Ants Challenge Human Sociobiology.Ryan Ketcham - 2019 - Biological Theory 14 (1):52-68.
    After biologist Deborah Gordon made a series of experimental discoveries in the 1980s, she argued that a change in terminology regarding the division of labor among castes of specialists was needed. Gordon’s investigations of the interactive effects of ants in colonies led her to believe that the established approach Edward O. Wilson had pioneered was biased in a way that made some alternative candidate adaptive explanations invisible. Gordon argued that this was because the term “division of labor” implied a division (...)
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  5. Neural Reuse and the Modularity of Mind: Where to Next for Modularity?John Zerilli - 2019 - Biological Theory 14 (1):1-20.
    The leading hypothesis concerning the “reuse” or “recycling” of neural circuits builds on the assumption that evolution might prefer the redeployment of established circuits over the development of new ones. What conception of cognitive architecture can survive the evidence for this hypothesis? In particular, what sorts of “modules” are compatible with this evidence? I argue that the only likely candidates will, in effect, be the columns which Vernon Mountcastle originally hypothesized some 60 years ago, and which form part of the (...)
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  6. Agonism Management Through Agonistic Vocal Signaling in Subterranean Rodents: A Neglected Factor Facilitating Sociality?Gabriel Francescoli & Cristian Schleich - 2019 - Biological Theory 14 (1):42-51.
    Communication is inherent to social relationships. Previous papers addressed the correlation between social and communicative complexity, and the origin of sociality in rodents. In subterranean social species, as the number of animals in the same burrow increases, so do interindividual contact rates. This is because of limitations in actually used tunnel length and diameter, leading to an increasing number of agonistic situations probably resulting in time loss, threatening, and fighting with danger of injuries. To avoid this, social species are expected (...)
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  7. Biosemiotic and psychopathology of the ordo amoris. In dialogo con Max Scheler.Guido Cusinato - 2018 - Milano MI, Italia: FrancoAngeli.
    How comes that two organisms can interact with each other or that we can comprehend what the other experiences? The theories of embodiment, intersubjectivity or empathy have repeatedly taken as their starting point an individualistic assumption (the comprehension of the other comes after the self-comprehension) or a cognitivist one (the affective dimension follows the cognitive process). The thesis of this book is that there are no two isolated entities at the origin which successively interact with each other. There is, rather, (...)
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  8. Vad är liv? Jakten på en ny definition av liv.Jessica Abbott & Erik Persson - 2017 - Lund, Sverige: Pufendorfinstitutet.
    I årtusenden har människan försökt definiera livet – hur levande djur och växter skiljer sig från död materia. Problemet är dock att livet är mångfacetterat, och varje regel har sitt undantag. Vi försöker möta kommande utmaningar med nya livsformer, genom att lyfta fram en ny definition av liv.
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  9. S ara G reen , Philosophy of Systems Biology: Perspectives from Scientists and Philosophers, Springer International Publishing, 2017, 265 pp, ISBN 978-3-319-47000-9. [REVIEW]Jonathan Davies - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (1):9.
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  10. Paleobiology and Philosophy.Adrian Currie - forthcoming - Biology and Philosophy.
    I offer four ways of distinguishing paleobiology from neontology, and from this develop a sketch of the philosophy of paleobiology. I then situate and describe the papers in the special issue Paleobiology and Philosophy, and reflect on the value and prospects of paleontology-focused philosophy.
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  11. Phronesis and Automated Science: The Case of Machine Learning and Biology.Emanuele Ratti - forthcoming - In Fabio Sterpetti & M. Bertolaso (eds.), Will Science Remain Human? Springer.
    The applications of machine learning and deep learning to the natural sciences has fostered the idea that the automated nature of algorithmic analysis will gradually dispense human beings from scientific work. In this paper, I will show that this view is problematic, at least when ML is applied to biology. In particular, I will claim that ML is not independent of human beings and cannot form the basis of automated science. Computer scientists conceive their work as being a case of (...)
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  12. Coordination of Timers and Sensors in Cell Signaling.Junbin Qian, Lendert Gelens & Mathieu Bollen - 2019 - Bioessays 41 (3):1800217.
    Timers and sensors are common devices that make our daily life safer, more convenient, and more efficient. In a cellular context, they arguably play an even more crucial role as they ensure the survival of cells in the presence of various extrinsic and intrinsic stresses. Biological timers and sensors generate distinct signaling profiles, enabling them to produce different types of cellular responses. Recent data suggest that they can work together to guarantee correct timing and responsiveness. By exploring examples of cellular (...)
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  13. Sentience and Consciousness in Single Cells: How the First Minds Emerged in Unicellular Species.František Baluška & Arthur Reber - 2019 - Bioessays 41 (3):1800229.
    A reductionistic, bottom‐up, cellular‐based concept of the origins of sentience and consciousness has been put forward. Because all life is based on cells, any evolutionary theory of the emergence of sentience and consciousness must be grounded in mechanisms that take place in prokaryotes, the simplest unicellular species. It has been posited that subjective awareness is a fundamental property of cellular life. It emerges as an inherent feature of, and contemporaneously with, the very first life‐forms. All other varieties of mentation are (...)
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  14. Veins and Arteries Build Hierarchical Branching Patterns Differently: Bottom‐Up Versus Top‐Down.Kristy Red‐Horse & Arndt F. Siekmann - 2019 - Bioessays 41 (3):1800198.
    A tree‐like hierarchical branching structure is present in many biological systems, such as the kidney, lung, mammary gland, and blood vessels. Most of these organs form through branching morphogenesis, where outward growth results in smaller and smaller branches. However, the blood vasculature is unique in that it exists as two trees (arterial and venous) connected at their tips. Obtaining this organization might therefore require unique developmental mechanisms. As reviewed here, recent data indicate that arterial trees often form in reverse order. (...)
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  15. Design Methodologies and the Limits of the Engineering-Dominated Conception of Synthetic Biology.Tero Ijäs - 2019 - Acta Biotheoretica 67 (1):1-18.
    Synthetic biology is described as a new field of biotechnology that models itself on engineering sciences. However, this view of synthetic biology as an engineering field has received criticism, and both biologists and philosophers have argued for a more nuanced and heterogeneous understanding of the field. This paper elaborates the heterogeneity of synthetic biology by clarifying the role of design and the variability of design methodologies in synthetic biology. I focus on two prominent design methodologies: rational design and directed evolution. (...)
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  16. Mathematical Assessment of the Role of Early Latent Infections and Targeted Control Strategies on Syphilis Transmission Dynamics.D. Okuonghae, A. B. Gumel, B. O. Ikhimwin & E. Iboi - 2019 - Acta Biotheoretica 67 (1):47-84.
    A new multi-stage deterministic model for the transmission dynamics of syphilis, which incorporates disease transmission by individuals in the early latent stage of syphilis infection and the reversions of early latent syphilis to the primary and secondary stages, is formulated and rigorously analysed. The model is used to assess the population-level impact of preventive and therapeutic measures against the spread of the disease in a community. It is shown that the disease-free equilibrium of the model is globally-asymptotically stable whenever the (...)
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  17. Can Vestibular Stimulation Be Used to Treat Obesity?Paul D. McGeoch - 2019 - Bioessays 41 (2):1800197.
    It is hypothesized that repeated, non‐invasive stimulation of the vestibular (balance) system, via a small electrical current to the skin behind the ears, will cause the brain centers that control energy homeostasis to shift the body toward a leaner physique. This is because these centers integrate multiple inputs to, in effect, fix a set‐point for body fat, which though difficult to alter is not immutable. They will interpret repeated stimulation of the parts of the vestibular system that detect acceleration as (...)
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  18. Let's Stop the Sloppy Use of “Lamarckian”.Dave Speijer - 2019 - Bioessays 41 (2):1800258.
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  19. Moving Past the Levels of Selection Debates.Stephen M. Downes - 2009 - Biology and Philosophy 24 (5):703-709.
  20. Studying Animal Languages Without Translation: An Insight From Ants. By Zhanna Reznikova. [REVIEW]Stephen Francis Mann & Jessica Pfeifer - 2018 - Quarterly Review of Biology 93:38.
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  21. CRISPR: A New Principle of Genome Engineering Linked to Conceptual Shifts in Evolutionary Biology.Eugene V. Koonin - 2019 - Biology and Philosophy 34 (1):9.
    The CRISPR-Cas systems of bacterial and archaeal adaptive immunity have become a household name among biologists and even the general public thanks to the unprecedented success of the new generation of genome editing tools utilizing Cas proteins. However, the fundamental biological features of CRISPR-Cas are of no lesser interest and have major impacts on our understanding of the evolution of antivirus defense, host-parasite coevolution, self versus non-self discrimination and mechanisms of adaptation. CRISPR-Cas systems present the best known case in point (...)
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  22. How Biological Technology Should Inform the Causal Selection Debate.Janella Baxter - 2019 - Philosophy, Theory, and Practice in Biology 11.
    Waters’s (2007) actual difference making and Weber’s (2013, 2017) biological normality approaches to causal selection have received many criticisms, some of which miss their target. Disagreement about whether Waters’s and Weber’s views succeed in providing criteria that uniquely singles out the gene as explanatorily significant in biology has led philosophers to overlook a prior problem. Before one can address whether Waters’s and Weber’s views successfully account for the explanatory significance of genes, one must ask whether either view satisfactorily meets the (...)
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  23. Evolving Across the Explanatory Gap.Peter Godfrey-Smith - 2019 - Philosophy, Theory, and Practice in Biology 11.
    One way to express the most persistent part of the mind-body problem is to say that there is an “explanatory gap” between the physical and the mental. The gap is not usually taken to apply to all of the mental, but to subjective experience, the mind’s “qualitative” features, or what is now referred to as “phenomenal consciousness.” The “gap” formulation is due to Joseph Levine. He acknowledged the appeal of intuitions of separability between physical facts, of any kind we can (...)
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  24. Revamping the Image of Science for the Anthropocene.S. Andrew Inkpen & C. Tyler DesRoches - 2019 - Philosophy, Theory, and Practice in Biology 11.
    In 2016, a multidisciplinary body of scholars within the International Commission on Stratigraphy—the Anthropocene Working Group—recommended that the world officially recognize the Anthropocene as a new geological epoch. The most contested claim about the Anthropocene, that humans are a major geological and environmental force on par with natural forces, has proven to be a hotbed for discussion well beyond the science of geology. One reason for this is that it compels many natural and social scientists to confront problems and systems (...)
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  25. The Role of Assessor Teaching in Human Culture.Laureano Castro, Miguel Ángel Castro-Nogueira, Morris Villarroel & Miguel Ángel Toro - forthcoming - Biological Theory:1-10.
    According to the dual inheritance theory, cultural learning in our species is a biased and highly efficient process of transmitting cultural traits. Here we define a model of cultural learning where social learning is integrated as a complementary element that facilitates the discovery of a specific behavior by an apprentice, and not as a mechanism that works in opposition to individual learning. In that context, we propose that the emergence of the ability to approve or disapprove of offspring behavior, orienting (...)
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  26. CRISPR-Cas Immunity: Beyond Nonself and Defence.Thomas Pradeu & Jean-François Moreau - 2019 - Biology and Philosophy 34 (1):6.
    In this commentary of Koonin’s target paper, we defend an extended view of CRISPR-Cas immunity by arguing that CRISPR-Cas includes, but cannot be reduced to, defence against nonself. CRISPR-Cas systems can target endogenous elements and tolerate exogenous elements. We conclude that the vocabulary of “defence” and “nonself” might be misleading when describing CRISPR-Cas systems.
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  27. Haben menschliche Embryonen eine Disposition zur Personalität?Anne Sophie Meincke - 2018 - In Markus Rothhaar, Martin Hähnel & Roland Kipke (eds.), Der manipulierbare Embryo. Münster, Germany: pp. 147-171.
    Do human embryos have a disposition to personhood? This has been argued within recent attempts to reformulate the classical argument from potentiality for the protection of human embryos with the help of the concept of disposition. In this paper, I analyse the central ontological premise of this new approach and show that any hopes of rehabilitating in dispositionalist terms the idea of a potential to personhood inherent in human embryos are mistaken. The dispositionalist version of the potentiality argument navigates in (...)
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  28. Potentialität und Disposition in der Diskussion über den Status des menschlichen Embryos: Zur Ontologie des Potentialitätsarguments.Anne Sophie Meincke - 2015 - Philosophisches Jahrbuch 122 (2):271-303.
    The argument from potentiality for embryo protection relies on the assumption of a specific developmental potential of human embryos: as human embryos under normal conditions naturally developing into beings whose strong moral status is uncontroversial, namely into human persons, they likewise enjoy strong moral status. In my paper, I endeavour to spell out the ontological foundations of the argument from potentiality and to discuss them critically in the light of new empirical findings in embryology. Particular attention is hereby paid to (...)
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  29. Persons as Biological Processes: A Bio-Processual Way Out of the Personal Identity Dilemma.Anne Sophie Meincke - 2018 - In Daniel J. Nicholson & John Dupre (eds.), Everything Flows. Towards a Processual Philosophy of Biology. Oxford, UK: pp. 357-378.
    Human persons exist longer than a single moment in time; they persist through time. However, so far it has not been possible to make this natural and widespread assumption metaphysically comprehensible. The philosophical debate on personal identity is rather stuck in a dilemma: reductionist theories explain personal identity away, while non-reductionist theories fail to give any informative account at all. This chapter argues that this dilemma emerges from an underlying commitment, shared by both sides of in the debate, to an (...)
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  30. The Many Meanings of “Cost” and “Benefit:” Biological Altruism, Biological Agency, and the Identification of Social Behaviours.Peter J. Woodford - 2019 - Biology and Philosophy 34 (1):4.
    The puzzle of how altruism can evolve has been at the center of recent debates over Hamilton’s Rule, inclusive fitness, and kin-selection. In this paper, I use recent debates over altruism and Hamilton’s legacy as an example to illustrate a more general problem in evolutionary theory that has philosophical significance; I attempt to explain this significance and to draw a variety of conclusions about it. The problem is that specific behaviours and general concepts of organism agency and intentionality are defined (...)
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  31. “Memetic Engineering”, Please! Thought, Values and Behaviour Are as Important as Technology!Andrew Moore - 2019 - Bioessays 41 (1):1800242.
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  32. Can All Major ROS Forming Sites of the Respiratory Chain Be Activated By High FADH2 /NADH Ratios?Dave Speijer - 2019 - Bioessays 41 (1):1800180.
    Aspects of peroxisome evolution, uncoupling, carnitine shuttles, supercomplex formation, and missing neuronal fatty acid oxidation (FAO) are linked to reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in respiratory chains. Oxidation of substrates with high FADH2/NADH (F/N) ratios (e.g., FAs) initiate ROS formation in Complex I due to insufficient availability of its electron acceptor (Q) and reverse electron transport from QH2, e.g., during FAO or glycerol‐3‐phosphate shuttle use. Here it is proposed that the Q‐cycle of Complex III contributes to enhanced ROS formation going (...)
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  33. A Perspective on the Potential Utility of a Viscosupplement Multifunctional Biotherapeutic.James Melrose - 2019 - Bioessays 41 (1):1800215.
  34. Scientific Knowledge in the Age of Computation: Explicated, Computable and Manageable?Sophia Efstathiou, Rune Nydal, Astrid Lægreid & Martin Kuiper - forthcoming - Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia.
    Through an empirical account of Knowledge Management-enabled research in systems biology, we argue that computational KM helps produce new first-order biological knowledge, in new ways. KM is enabled by conceiving of ‘knowledge’ as an object for computational science: explicated in the text of biological articles and computable via appropriate data and metadata. These founded concepts risk underestimating practice-based knowing in ensuring the validity of ‘manageable’ knowledge as knowledge.
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  35. Multidrug Therapy for HIV Infection: Dynamics of Immune System.Deepmala Kamboj & M. D. Sharma - forthcoming - Acta Biotheoretica.
    A mathematical model of the dynamics of the immune system is considered to illustrate the effect of its response to HIV infection, i.e. on viral growth and on T-cell dynamics. The specific immune response is measured by the levels of cytotoxic lymphocytes in a human body. The existence and stability analyses are performed for infected steady state and uninfected steady state. In order to keep infection under control, roles of drug therapies are analyzed in the presence of efficient immune response. (...)
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  36. Toward a Macroevolutionary Theory of Human Evolution: The Social Protocell.Claes Andersson & Petter Törnberg - forthcoming - Biological Theory:1-17.
    Despite remarkable empirical and methodological advances, our theoretical understanding of the evolutionary processes that made us human remains fragmented and contentious. Here, we make the radical proposition that the cultural communities within which Homo emerged may be understood as a novel exotic form of organism. The argument begins from a deep congruence between robust features of Pan community life cycles and protocell models of the origins of life. We argue that if a cultural tradition, meeting certain requirements, arises in the (...)
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  37. Review of Other Minds: The Octopus, the Sea and the Deep Origins of Consciousness. [REVIEW]Daniel Dennett - 2019 - Biology and Philosophy 34 (1):2.
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  38. The Concept of Innateness as an Object of Empirical Enquiry.Richard Samuels - 2016 - In Justin Sytsma & Wesley Buckwalter (eds.), Blackwell Companion to Experimental Philosophy. Blackwell. pp. 504-519.
  39. Sabina Leonelli, Data-Centric Biology: A Philosophical Study , 288 pp., $35.00, Paperback, ISBN: 9780226416472. [REVIEW]Youjung Shin - 2018 - Journal of the History of Biology 51 (4):887-889.
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  40. Philosophy in the Trenches: Reflections on The Eugenic Mind Project.Alan C. Love - 2018 - Philosophy, Theory, and Practice in Biology 10.
    Robert Wilson’s The Eugenic Mind Project is a major achievement of engaged scholarship and socially relevant philosophy and history of science. It exemplifies the virtues of interdisciplinarity. As principal investigator of the Living Archives on Eugenics in Western Canada project, while employed in the Department of Philosophy at the University of Alberta, Wilson encountered a proverbial big ball of mud with questions and issues that involved local individuals living through a painful set of memories and implicated his institutional home in (...)
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  41. What Do Biologists Make of the Species Problem?Damjan Franjević, Pavel Gregorić & Bruno Pušić - 2017 - Acta Biotheoretica 65 (3):179-209.
    The concept of species is one of the core concepts in biology and one of the cornerstones of evolutionary biology, yet it is rife with conceptual problems. Philosophers of biology have been discussing the concept of species for decades, and in doing so they sometimes appeal to the views of biologists. However, their statements as to what biologists think are seldom supported by empirical data. In order to investigate what biologists actually think about the key issues related to the problem (...)
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  42. Private Property Rights and the Public Interest in Exploration of Outer Space.Frans Dunk - 2018 - Biological Theory 13 (2):142-151.
    The impending missions to exploit natural resources of celestial bodies may at some point start interfering with the scientific interests, including those of astrobiology, in these bodies. While the legal status of celestial bodies at the highest level is clear, uncertainty has arisen as to the extent private property rights over such objects or over their resources are legally acceptable, legally impossible, or potentially legal. This also provides for a considerable amount of uncertainty regarding how the legal framework could or (...)
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  43. Establishing a Framework for a Natural Area Taxonomy.Bernard Michaux & Malte Ebach - 2017 - Acta Biotheoretica 65 (3):167-177.
    The identification of areas of endemism is essential in building an area classification, but plays little role in how natural areas are discovered. Rather area monophyly, derived from cladistics, is essential in the discovery of natural area classifications or area taxonomy. We propose Area Taxonomy to be a new sub-discipline of historical biogeography, one that can be revised and debated, and which has its own area nomenclature. Separately to area taxonomy, we outline how natural areas may be discovered by transcribing (...)
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  44. Mapping Biological Transmission: An Empirical, Dynamical, and Evolutionary Approach.Livio Riboli-Sasco & Francesca Merlin - 2017 - Acta Biotheoretica 65 (2):97-115.
    The current debate over extending inheritance and its evolutionary impact has focused on adding new categories of non-genetic factors to the classical transmission of DNA, and on trying to redefine inheritance. Transmitted factors have been mainly characterized by their directions of transmission and the way they store variations. In this paper, we leave aside the issue of defining inheritance. We rather try to build an evolutionary conceptual framework that allows for tracing most, if not all forms of transmission and makes (...)
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  45. A Greedy Algorithm for Brain MRI’s Registration.Clément Chesseboeuf - 2016 - Acta Biotheoretica 64 (4):359-374.
    This document presents a non-rigid registration algorithm for the use of brain magnetic resonance images comparison. More precisely, we want to compare pre-operative and post-operative MR images in order to assess the deformation due to a surgical removal. The proposed algorithm has been studied in Chesseboeuf et al., following ideas of Trouvé, in which the author introduces the algorithm within a very general framework. Here we recalled this theory from a practical point of view. The emphasis is on illustrations and (...)
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  46. Wound Healing and Scale Modelling in Zebrafish.V. Volpert, D. Dhouailly, J. Demongeot, N. Bessonov & F. Caraguel - 2016 - Acta Biotheoretica 64 (4):343-358.
    We propose to study the wound healing in Zebrafish by using firstly a differential approach for modelling morphogens diffusion and cell chemotactic motion, and secondly a hybrid model of tissue regeneration, where cells are considered as individual objects and molecular concentrations are described by partial differential equations.
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  47. What’s Wrong with the Modern Evolutionary Synthesis? A Critical Reply to Welch.Johan Braeckman, Stefaan Blancke, Lieven Pauwels, Alexis Tiège & Koen Tanghe - 2018 - Biology and Philosophy 33 (3 - 4):1-21.
    Welch :263–279, 2017) has recently proposed two possible explanations for why the field of evolutionary biology is plagued by a steady stream of claims that it needs urgent reform. It is either seriously deficient and incapable of incorporating ideas that are new, relevant and plausible or it is not seriously deficient at all but is prone to attracting discontent and to the championing of ideas that are not very relevant, plausible and/or not really new. He argues for the second explanation. (...)
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  48. Amorphic Kinds: Cluster’s Last Stand?Neil Williams - 2018 - Biology and Philosophy 33 (1 - 2):1-19.
    I raise a puzzle case for “cluster” accounts of natural kinds—the homeostatic property cluster and stable property cluster accounts, especially—on the basis of their expected treatment of the metaphysics of certain disease kinds. Some kinds, I argue, fail to exhibit the co-instantiated property clusters these cluster views take to be constitutive of natural kinds. Some genetic diseases, for example, have archetypical instances with few or none of the pathological processes or symptoms associated with the kind: their instances are typified by (...)
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  49. Preface.Alain Miranville, Rémy Guillevin, Jean-Pierre Françoise & Hermine Biermé - 2016 - Acta Biotheoretica 64 (4):309-310.
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  50. From Correlation to Causation: What Do We Need in the Historical Sciences?Michaelis Michael & Malte Ebach - 2016 - Acta Biotheoretica 64 (3):241-262.
    Changes in the methodology of the historical sciences make them more vulnerable to unjustifiable speculations being passed off as scientific results. The integrity of historical science is in peril due the way speculative and often unexamined causal assumptions are being used to generate data and underpin the identification of correlations in such data. A step toward a solution is to distinguish between plausible and speculative assumptions that facilitate the inference from measured and observed data to causal claims. One way to (...)
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1 — 50 / 11017