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  1. F. Michael Akeroyd (2008). Mechanistic Explanation Versus Deductive-Nomological Explanation. Foundations of Chemistry 10 (1):39-48.
    This paper discusses the important paper by Paul Thagard on the pathway version of mechanistic explanation that is currently used in chemical explanation. The author claims that this method of explanation has a respectable pedigree and can be traced back to the Chemical Revolution in the arguments used by the Lavoisier School in their theoretical duels with Richard Kirwan, the proponent of a revised phlogistonian theory. Kirwan believed that complex chemical reactions could be explained by recourse to affinity tables that (...)
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  2. F. Michael Akeroyd (2000). The Foundations of Modern Organic Chemistry: The Rise of the Highes and Ingold Theory From 1930–1942. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 2 (2):99-125.
    The foundations of modern organic chemistry were laid by the seminal work of Hughes and Ingold. The rise from being an interesting alternative hypothesis in 1933 to being the leading theory (outside the USA) in 1942 was achieved by a multiplicity of methods. This include:the construction of a new scientific notation, the rationalisation of some seemingly contradictory reported data, the refutation of the experimental work of one of their persistent critics, the use of conceptual arguments and also the achievement of (...)
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  3. F. Michael Akeroyd (1997). Conceptual Aspects of Theory Appraisal: Some Biochemical Examples. Hyle 3 (1):95 - 102.
    This paper considers papers on conceptual analysis by Laudan (1981) and Whitt (1989) and relates them to three biochemical episodes: (1) the modern 'biochemical explanation' of acupuncture; (2) the chemio-osmotic hypothesis of oxidative phosphorylation; (3) the theory of the complete digestion of proteins in the gut. The advantages of including philosophical debate in chemical/biochemical undergraduate courses is then discussed.
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  4. B. R. Allanson & J. D. van Wyk (1969). An Introduction to the Physics and Chemistry of Some Lakes in Northern Zululand. Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 38 (3):217-240.
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  5. Brian R. Allanson, Bronwyn Maree & Neil Grange (2000). An Introduction to the Chemistry of the Water Column of the Knysna Estuary with Particular Reference to Nutrients and Suspended Solids. Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 55 (2):141-162.
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  6. Shawn B. Allin (2003). Book Review: Holmes, Frederic L. And Trevor H. Levere (Eds.): "Instruments and Experimentation in the History of Chemistry", (Cambridge MA, 2000). [REVIEW] Hyle 9 (1):120 - 123.
  7. Shawn B. Allin (2003). Cathy Cobb: Magick, Mayhem, and Mavericks: The Spirited History of Physical Chemistry. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 5 (3):249-252.
  8. Shawn B. Allin (2001). Book Review: Psarros, N. And K. Gavroglu (Eds.): "Ars Mutandi: Issues in Philosophy and History of Chemistry" (Leipzig 1999). [REVIEW] Hyle 7 (1):61 - 63.
  9. Beverly S. Almgren (1967). Milestones of Modern Chemistry: Original Reports of the DiscoveriesEduard Farber. Isis 58 (3):432-433.
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  10. Selen Altunata (2001). Essay: Chemistry and Humanity: Challenges Our Profession Faces as We Advance Towards the Third Millenium. Hyle 7 (1):51 - 60.
  11. Julian L. Ambrus & Clara M. Ambrus (1978). Chemistry and Biology of Thrombin by Roger L. Lundblad, John W. Fenton II, and Kenneth G. Mann. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 21 (4):632-633.
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  12. Robert Anderson (2012). Early Railway Chemistry and Its Legacy. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 45 (4):688-690.
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  13. Robert G. W. Anderson (2012). Russell and Hudson, Early Railway Chemistry and Its Legacy. Cambridge: Royal Society of Chemistry, 2012. Pp. Xiii + 193. ISBN 978-1-84973-326-7. £29.99. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 45 (4):688-690.
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  14. Wilda C. Anderson (1984). Between the Library and the Laboratory the Language of Chemistry in Eighteenth-Century France.
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  15. Roberta Brayner Anne Aimable, Mathieu Roze Jean-Pierre Llored & Stephane Sarrade (2013). Chemistry and Interfaces. In Jean-Pierre Llored (ed.), The Philosophy of Chemistry: Practices, Methodologies, and Concepts. Cambridge Scholars Press.
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  16. Saba Bahar (2001). Jane Marcet and the Limits to Public Science. British Journal for the History of Science 34 (1):29-49.
    This essay examines Jane Marcet's 1806 Conversations on Chemistry in the context of a newly emerging ideology of science. As part of this emergence, a new public for chemistry had to be formed and clearly demarcated from that of ‘public men’ of science. Although this essay examines Marcet's relation to Humphry Davy's public lectures on chemistry, it focuses on the encouragement she received from the highly intellectual Geneva elite, to whom she was related. Comparing her work to the influential Bibliothèque (...)
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  17. Davis Baird (2000). Encapsulating Knowledge: The Direct Reading Spectrometer. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 2 (1):5-46.
    The direct reading emission spectrometer was developed during the1940s. By substituting photo-multiplier tubes and electronics forphotographic film spectrograms, the interpretation of special lineswith a densitometer was avoided. Instead, the instrument providedthe desired information concerning percentage concentration ofelements of interest directly on a dial. Such instruments `de-skill' the job of making such measurements. They do this by encapsulatingin the instrument the skills previously employed by the analyst,by `skilling' the instrument. This paper presents a history of thedevelopment of the Dow Chemical/Baird Associates (...)
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  18. Davis Baird, Eric R. Scerri & Lee C. McIntyre (eds.) (2006). Philosophy of Chemistry: Synthesis of a New Discipline. Springer.
    This comprehensive volume marks a new standard in scholarship in the still emerging field of the philosophy of chemistry. With selections drawn from a wide range of scholarly disciplines, philosophers, chemists, and historians of science here converge to ask some of the most fundamental questions about the relationship between philosophy and chemistry. What can chemistry teach us about longstanding disputes in the philosophy of science over such issues as reductionism, autonomy, and supervenience? And what new issues may chemistry bring to (...)
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  19. A. T. Balaban (2005). Reflections About Mathematical Chemistry. Foundations of Chemistry 7 (3):289-306.
    A personal account is presented for the present status of mathematical chemistry, with emphasis on non-numerical applications. These use mainly graph-theoretical concepts. Most computational chemical applications involve quantum chemistry and are therefore largely reducible to physics, while discrete mathematical applications often do not. A survey is provided for opinions and definitions of mathematical chemistry, and then for journals, books and book series, as well as symposia of mathematical chemistry.
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  20. Philip Ball (2006). Chemistry and Power in Recent American Fiction. Hyle 12 (1):45 - 66.
    Writers of fiction have always held up a mirror to the world around them. The perspective they typically present is not one gathered from polls of public opinion, nor is it culled from the way issues are presented in the media. Yet in retrospect, the personal attitudes and views expressed in good literary fiction frequently prove to offer a revealing snapshot of trends in thought and topics of debate in the writer's milieu. With this in mind, I shall explore some (...)
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  21. Claudette Balpe (1999). Constitution d'Un Enseignement Expérimental: La Physique Et Chimie Dans les Écoles Centrales/The Constitution of the Teaching of Experimental Science: Physics and Chemistry in the Écoles Centrales. Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 52 (2):241-284.
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  22. Claudette Balpe (1999). The Constitution of the Teaching of Experimental Science: Physics and Chemistry in the Ecoles Centrales. Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 52 (2):241-284.
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  23. Marina Paola Banchetti-Robino (2014). From Corpuscles to Elements: Chemical Ontologies From Van Helmont to Lavoisier. In Lee McIntyre & Eric Scerri (eds.), Philosophy of Chemistry: Growth of a New Discipline. Springer. pp. 141-154.
  24. Marina Paola Banchetti-Robino (2013). The Relevance of Boyle's Chemical Philosophy for Contemporary Philosophy of Chemistry. In Jean-Pierre Llored (ed.), The Philosophy of Chemistry: Practices, Methodologies, and Concepts.
  25. Marina Paola Banchetti-Robino (2011). Ontological Tensions in Sixteenth and Seventeenth Century Chemistry: Between Mechanism and Vitalism. Foundations of Chemistry 13 (3):173-186.
    The sixteenth and seventeenth centuries marks a period of transition between the vitalistic ontology that had dominated Renaissance natural philosophy and the Early Modern mechanistic paradigm endorsed by, among others, the Cartesians and Newtonians. This paper will focus on how the tensions between vitalism and mechanism played themselves out in the context of sixteenth and seventeenth century chemistry and chemical philosophy, particularly in the works of Paracelsus, Jan Baptista Van Helmont, Robert Fludd, and Robert Boyle. Rather than argue that these (...)
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  26. A. Barry (2005). Pharmaceutical Matters: The Invention of Informed Materials. Theory, Culture and Society 22 (1):51-69.
    Drawing on the work of Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent and Isabelle Stengers on the history of chemistry, this article develops the idea that drug molecules can be understood as ‘informed materials’. This study argues that molecules should not be viewed as discrete objects, but as constituted in their relations to complex informational and material environments. Through a case study of commercial pharmaceutical R&D, the article examines the role of combinatorial and computational chemistry in enriching the informational and material environment of potential drug (...)
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  27. Subhash C. Basak (2013). Philosophy of Mathematical Chemistry: A Personal Perspective. Hyle 19 (1):3 - 17.
    This article discusses the nature of mathematical chemistry, discrete mathematical chemistry in particular. Molecules and macromolecules can be represented by model objects using methods of discrete mathematics, e.g., graphs and matrices. Mathematical formalisms are further applied on the model objects to distill various quantitative characteristics. The end product of such an exercise can be a better understanding of chemistry, the development of quantitative scales for qualitative notions of chemistry, or an illumination of the structural basis of chemical and biological properties. (...)
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  28. Henry H. Bauer (2002). 'Pathological Science'; is Not Scientific Misconduct (nor is It Pathological). Hyle 8 (1):5 - 20.
    'Pathological' science implies scientific misconduct: it should not happen and the scientists concerned ought to know better. However, there are no clear and generally agreed definitions of pathological science or of scientific misconduct. The canonical exemplars of pathological science in chemistry (N-rays, polywater) as well as the recent case of cold fusion in electrochemistry involved research practices not clearly distinguishable from those in (revolutionary) science. The concept of 'pathological science' was put forth nearly half a century ago in a seminar (...)
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  29. Theodor Benfey (2000). Reflections on the Philosophy of Chemistry and a Rallying Call for Our Discipline. Foundations of Chemistry 2 (3):195-205.
    Biology in the popular mind remains tied to the doctrines of the struggle forsurvival and the survival of the fittest. Physics is linked to the heat deathof the universe – the inexorable march towards greater disorder,increasing entropy. Our field, on the other hand, focuses on orderedstructures, molecules and crystals, and their aggregates, and what holdsthem together. The philosophy of chemistry is centered on affinity,cohesion, the architecture of the very small, attraction, harmony, and, ifyou permit, beauty. Our discipline is the voice (...)
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  30. Juan Bautista Bengoetxea (2002). Of Minds and Molecules. New Philosophical Perspectives on Chemistry. Theoria 17 (1):191-193.
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  31. Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent (2014). Philosophy of Chemistry or Philosophy with Chemistry. Hyle: International Journal for Philosophy of Chemistry 20 (1):59-76.
    Chemistry deserves more philosophical attention not so much to do justice to a long-neglected science or to enhance its cultural prestige, but to undermine a number of taken-for-granted assumptions about scientific rationality and more importantly to diversify our metaphysical views of nature and reality. In brief, this paper does not make the case for a philosophy of chemistry. It rather urges philosophers of science to listen to chemists and discuss what they learn from them. Because over the course of many (...)
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  32. Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent (2010). Atomism and Positivism: A Legend About French Chemistry. Annals of Science 56 (1):81-94.
    The strong opposition of nineteenth-century French chemists to atomism is usually described as a national attitude due to the overarching influence of positivism in France. The explanation sounds plausible, at first glance. However, the idea that a philosophy of science acted as an obstacle to the advancement of science needs further investigation. What is meant exactly by a philosophical influence on a scientific community? In analysing the alleged influence of positivism on the chemists' community it is argued that the common (...)
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  33. Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent (2010). Editorial: Opening the Field of Nanoethics. Hyle 16 (1):1 - 2.
  34. Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent (2009). Editorial: Boundary Issues in Bionanotechnology. Hyle 15 (1):1 - 4.
  35. Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent (2008). Matière à Penser: Essais d'Histoire Et de Philosophie de la Chimie. Presses Universitaires de Paris Ouest.
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  36. Andrés Bernal, Guillermo Restrepo & José L. Villaveces (2010). Report: Symposium on the Philosophy of Chemistry, Universidad de Los Andes, Bogota, Colombia, 21-23 July 2009. Hyle 16 (1):43 - 45.
  37. Jerome A. Berson (2003). Chemical Discovery and the Logicians' Program a Problematic Pairing.
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  38. Gwenael Berthet & Jean-Baptiste Renard (2013). Chemistry of the Stratosphere: Metrological Insights and Reflection About Interdisciplinary Practical Networks. In Jean-Pierre Llored (ed.), The Philosophy of Chemistry: Practices, Methodologies, and Concepts. Cambridge Scholars Press.
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  39. Bertomeu Sánchez José Ramón (2004). Book Review: Lavoisier in Italia. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 6 (2):191-195.
  40. Karl H. Beyer (1977). Discovery of the Thiazides: Where Biology and Chemistry Meet. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 20 (3):410-420.
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  41. D. Bhattacharyya, P. Dickerson, G. R. Odette, S. A. Maloy, A. Misra & M. A. Nastasi (2012). On the Structure and Chemistry of Complex Oxide Nanofeatures in Nanostructured Ferritic Alloy U14YWT. Philosophical Magazine 92 (16):2089-2107.
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  42. Nalini Bhushan (2004). Introduction. Foundations of Chemistry 6 (1):3-9.
  43. Nalini Bhushan & Stuart M. Rosenfeld (eds.) (2000). Of Minds and Molecules: New Philosophical Perspectives on Chemistry. Oxford University Press.
    Of Minds and Molecules is the first anthology devoted exclusively to work in the philosophy of chemistry. The essays, written by both chemists and philosophers, adopt distinctive philosophical perspectives on chemistry and collectively offer both a conceptualization of and a justification for this emerging field.
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  44. Richard Bilsker (2001). Book Review: Rabinow, Paul: "French DNA: Trouble in Purgatory" (Chicago 1999). [REVIEW] Hyle 7 (1):73 - 75.
  45. Robert C. Bishop (2010). Whence Chemistry? Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 41 (2):171-177.
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  46. Roderick S. Black (forthcoming). Peter J. T. Morris: The Matter Factory: A History of the Chemistry Laboratory. Foundations of Chemistry:1-2.
  47. Ernst Bloch (1913). A History of Chemistry From the Earliest Times Till the Present DayCampbell Brown James. Isis 1 (2):279-280.
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  48. Marika Blondel-Mégrelis (2007). Liebig Or How to Popularize Chemistry. Hyle 13 (1):43 - 54.
    The popularization of chemistry was one of Liebig's major tasks. I examine why one of the most famous theoreticians and experimenters of organic chemistry came to this new and rather unusual project in the mid-19th century, and how he managed to create a new image of chemistry: no longer the servant of pharmacists and physicians, it must be considered the most useful of all sciences and the most popular.
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  49. John E. Bloor (2002). Ronald J. Gillespie and Paul L. A. Popelier: Chemical Bonding and Molecular Geometry: From Lewis to Electron Densities. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 4 (3):241-247.
  50. Paul A. Bogaard (2006). After Substance: How Aristotle's Question Still Bears on the Philosophy of Chemistry. Philosophy of Science 73 (5):853-863.
    This article will explore whether there are arguments for Aristotle's concept mixis which can aid our current discussions within the philosophy of chemistry. We remain troubled by the way and extent to which chemical substance in bulk can be identified with or reduced to the stability and structure of molecules, and whether these in turn can be identified with or reduced to elemental atoms and the quantum theoretical characterization of their electrons. Aristotle was as determined as we are to think (...)
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