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  1. İshak Arslan (2014). Pushing the Limits of the Universe: Criticisms of Peripatetic Cosmology in Hikmat Al-Ishr'q and its Commentaries. Nazariyat, Journal for the History of Islamic Philosophy and Sciences 1 (1):141-164.
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  2. Feraz Azhar & Jeremy Butterfield, Scientific Realism and Primordial Cosmology.
    We discuss scientific realism from the perspective of modern cosmology, especially primordial cosmology: i.e. the cosmological investigation of the very early universe. We first state our allegiance to scientific realism, and discuss what insights about it cosmology might yield, as against "just" supplying scientific claims that philosophers can then evaluate. In particular, we discuss: the idea of laws of cosmology, and limitations on ascertaining the global structure of spacetime. Then we review some of what is now known about the early (...)
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  3. Claus Beisbart & Tobias Jung (2007). Privileged, Typical, or Not Even That? – Our Place in the World According to the Copernican and the Cosmological Principles. Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 37 (2):225-256.
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  4. John Bell, Cosmological Theories and the Question of the Existence of a Creator.
    In a Vedic hymn, Reality or Being is proclaimed as having “arisen from Nothing”. By contrast, in Jaina cosmology time has no beginning; the universe, uncreated, has always existed.In Plato’s Timaeus the universe is conceived as not having existed eternally, but as having been created at some past time by a demiurge acting on pre-existing substance. We are all familiar with the arresting first line of Genesis.
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  5. Carlton W. Berenda (1964). On the Cosmological Indeterminacy Principle of Mccrae. Philosophy of Science 31 (3):265-270.
    A recent proposal by Dr. W. H. McCrae, cosmologist and mathematician, to the effect that decisions between such cosmogonies as those of Hoyle and of Gamow are experimentally impossible by virtue of a general cosmological indeterminacy principle, is here examined and elaborated upon. Some comments on the "antinomies" in Kant's "Critique of Pure Reason" are made in reference to this principle as well as to the Heisenberg indeterminacy principle. If McCrae's principle is accepted, we will have moved a long way (...)
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  6. Nick Bostrom, Are Cosmological Theories Compatible with All Possible Evidence: A Missing Methodological Link.
    This paper argues that our current best cosmological theories, according to which cosmos is very big are compatible with all possible evidence. The problem is unrelated to the Quine-Duhem underdetermination thesis. The compatibility to which this paper draws attention is much more radical: it appears as if all of our best cosmological theories are perfectly probabilistically compatible with all possible evidence and that no empirical discovery could give us any reason whatever to favor one such theory over another. This consequence (...)
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  7. Juliette Carnus (1941). The Cosmological System of Pierre Bayle. Philosophy of Science 8 (4):585-597.
  8. John Christianson & Tycho Brahe (1968). Tycho Brahe's Cosmology From the Astrologia of 1591. Isis 59 (3):312-318.
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  9. William Lane Craig (1990). 'What Place, Then, for a Creator?': Hawking on God and Creation. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 41 (4):473-491.
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  10. WM Lane Craig (1993). The Caused Beginning of the Universe: A Response to Quentin Smith. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 44 (4):623-639.
  11. John Cramer, Hawking's Retreat.
    Seattle, the city where I live, teach, and do physics research, is the home of Paul Allen’s new Science Fiction Museum (SFM), located in the Experience Music Project building at Seattle Center, in the shadow of the Space Needle. The SFM is well worth a visit, offering a fascinating display of collected TV and movie props (e.g., Captain Kirk’s Chair from Star Trek ), SF memorabilia, and treasured books and manuscripts from the classic works of science fiction. In early December (...)
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  12. W. Davidson (1962). Philosophical Aspects of Cosmology. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 13 (50):120-129.
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  13. Paul Davies, Quantum Vacuum Friction.
    The quantum vacuum may in certain circumstances be regarded as a type of fluid medium, or aether, exhibiting energy density, pressure, stress and friction. Vacuum friction may be thought of as being responsible for the spontaneous creation of particles from the vacuum state when the system is non-stationary. Examples include the expanding universe, rotating black holes, moving mirrors, atoms passing close to surfaces, and the activities of sub-cellular biosystems. The concept of vacuum friction will be reviewed and illustrated, and some (...)
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  14. Robert Deltete (1998). Simplicity and Why the Universe Exists: A Reply to Quentin Smith. Philosophy 73 (3):490-494.
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  15. R. J. Diamond (1964). Resolution of the Paradox of Tristram Shandy. Philosophy of Science 31 (1):55-58.
  16. Ellery Eells (1988). Quentin Smith on Infinity and the Past. Philosophy of Science 55 (3):453-455.
    In a recent commendable article, Quentin Smith (1987) exposes fatal flaws in several recent attempts to demonstrate that it is logically impossible for the past to be infinite. However, his analysis of one of these flawed arguments--involving an interesting version of Russell's "Tristram Shandy paradox"--is off the mark, as I show in this paper.
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  17. Gad Freudenthal (2001). Time Matters: Time, Creation, and Cosmology in Medieval Jewish PhilosophyT. M. Rudavsky. Isis 92 (1):160-161.
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  18. George Gale & Niall Shanks (1996). Methodology and the Birth of Modern Cosmological Inquiry. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 27 (3):279-296.
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  19. Girela Luis (1999). Many Simple Universes or Only a Very Complex One? Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 14 (2):331-337.
    Through the mental experiment that I suggest, it is possiblc to demonstrate that Hugh Everett’s quantum interpretation, known as of the “many universes”, is incongruent with the special theory of relativity.
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  20. C. K. Grant (1955). Some Comments on 'the Age of the Universe'. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 6 (23):248-251.
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  21. Adolf Grünbaum (1996). Theological Misinterpretations of Current Physical Cosmology. Foundations of Physics 26 (4):523-543.
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  22. Adolf Grunbaum (1993). Narlikar's "Creation" of the Big Bang Universe Was a Mere Origination. Philosophy of Science 60 (4):638-646.
    In Grunbaum (1989, 374, 390), I objected to Narlikar's (1977, 136-137) designation "event of 'creation'" for a supposed first cosmic instant t = 0, which he imports into the big bang cosmology of the general theory of relativity (GTR). Narlikar (1992, 361-362) does reject a theological construal of the "creation". But, endeavoring to justify his secular creationism, he now points out that, in the GTR, the usual derivation of matter-energy conservation from Hilbert's stationary action principle cannot be extended to include (...)
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  23. R. Harré (1962). Philosophical Aspects of Cosmology. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 13 (50):104-119.
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  24. George Harris, Oh, for the Simple Days of the Big Bang.
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  25. David Hawkins (1971). On the Self Consistency of the Steady-State Cosmology. Philosophy of Science 38 (2):273-279.
  26. Matthias Heymann (2010). Lumping, Testing, Tuning: The Invention of an Artificial Chemistry in Atmospheric Transport Modeling. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 41 (3):218-232.
  27. E. H. Hutten (1955). A Note on 'the Age of the Universe'. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 6 (21):58-61.
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  28. Ernest H. Hutten (1962). Methodological Remarks Concerning Cosmology. The Monist 47 (1):104-115.
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  29. Julian Huxley (1959). You and the Universe by N.J. Berrill. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 2 (4):518-519.
  30. J. K. (1998). The Role of Biblical Interpretation in the Cosmology of Tycho Brahe. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 29 (4):515-537.
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  31. Pierre Kerszberg (1987). On the Alleged Equivalence Between Newtonian and Relativistic Cosmology. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 38 (3):347-380.
    Among the many controversial contributions of E. A. Milne to cosmology, the only one which is taken seriously today (to the extent that it has been absorbed as a premise in most scientific approaches to the problem of the universe as a totality) is his early suggestion that a formal equivalence may be made between Newtonian and Relativistic cosmology. My own paper suggests that, over and above any logical validity in the alleged equivalence, the actual way in which it has (...)
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  32. Joshua Knobe, Ken D. Olum & And Alexander Vilenkin (2006). Philosophical Implications of Inflationary Cosmology. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 57 (1):47-67.
    Recent developments in cosmology indicate that every history having a non-zero probability is realized in infinitely many distinct regions of spacetime. Thus, it appears that the universe contains infinitely many civilizations exactly like our own, as well as infinitely many civilizations that differ from our own in any way permitted by physical laws. We explore the implications of this conclusion for ethical theory and for the doomsday argument. In the infinite universe, we find that the doomsday argument applies only to (...)
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  33. John Leslie (1988). No Inverse Gambler's Fallacy in Cosmology. Mind 97 (386):269-272.
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  34. R. M. (2003). Leibniz and the Post-Copernican Universe. Koyre Revisited. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 34 (2):309-327.
    This paper employs the revised conception of Leibniz emerging from recent research to reassess critically the 'radical spiritual revolution' which, according to Alexandre Koyre's landmark book, From the closed world to the infinite universe (1957) was precipitated in the seventeenth century by the revolutions in physics, astronomy, and cosmology. While conceding that the cosmological revolution necessitated a reassessment of the place of value-concepts within cosmology, it argues that this reassessment did not entail a spiritual revolution of the kind assumed by (...)
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  35. N. Markosian (1995). On the Argument From Quantum Cosmology Against Theism. Analysis 55 (4):247-251.
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  36. Maxim W. Mikulak (1958). Soviet Philosophic-Cosmological Thought. Philosophy of Science 25 (1):35-50.
  37. D. M. Moon & R. Stickler (1971). Creep of Fine Wires of Powder Metallurgical Tungsten. Philosophical Magazine 24 (191):1087-1094.
  38. Parry Moon & Domina Eberle Spencer (1958). Retardation in Cosmology. Philosophy of Science 25 (4):287-292.
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  39. Milton K. Munitz (1962). The Logic of Cosmology. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 13 (49):34-50.
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  40. Milton K. Munitz (1952). Scientific Method in Cosmology. Philosophy of Science 19 (2):108-130.
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  41. Ernst J. Öpik (1954). The Age of the Universe. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 5 (19):203-214.
  42. J. Brian Pitts (2008). Why the Big Bang Singularity Does Not Help the Kal M Cosmological Argument for Theism. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 59 (4):675-708.
    The cosmic singularity provides negligible evidence for creation in the finite past, and hence theism. A physical theory might have no metric or multiple metrics, so a ‘beginning’ must involve a first moment, not just finite age. Whether one dismisses singularities or takes them seriously, physics licenses no first moment. The analogy between the Big Bang and stellar gravitational collapse indicates that a Creator is required in the first case only if a Destroyer is needed in the second. The need (...)
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  43. Richard Schlegel (1971). On the Self-Consistency of the Steady-State Cosmology: Reply to David Hawkins. Philosophy of Science 38 (2):280-281.
  44. Richard Schlegel (1954). The Age of the Universe. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 5 (19):226-236.
  45. Michael Scriven (1954). The Age of the Universe. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 5 (19):181-190.
  46. William A. Silverman (1980). Medical Inflation. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 23 (4):617-637.
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  47. Robin Small (1986). Tristram Shandy's Last Page. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 37 (2):213-216.
    This note criticises an argument used by W. L. Craig against an actual infinity of past events. He argues that if Russell's use of the story of Tristram Shandy, who took a year to recount each day of his life, is extended into an infinite past, then Cantor's principle of correspondence leads to the absurd conclusion that Tristram Shandy has already written his last page. I show that no such conclusion can be drawn, and that a ‘past’ version of the (...)
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  48. Joseph Wayne Smith & Sharyn Ward (1984). Are We Only Five Minutes Old? Acock on the Age of the Universe. Philosophy of Science 51 (3):511-513.
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  49. Quentin Smith (1994). Did the Big Bang Have a Cause? British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 45 (2):649-668.
    where ds is the space-time interval between two events, a the scale factor representing the radius of the universe at a given time, and do is the line element of a space with constant curvature. The application of this metric to the field equations provides us with the Friedmann’s solutions, which are the heart of big bang cosmology. With the cosmological constant omitted, these solutions read.
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  50. R. G. Swinburne (1966). Cosmological Horizons. Philosophy of Science 33 (3):210-214.
    HORIZONS ARE FRONTIERS BETWEEN THINGS OBSERVABLE AND THINGS UNOBSERVABLE. EVEN IS SUCH HORIZONS EXIST WE MAY LEARN ABOUT UNOBSERVABLE REGIONS OF THE UNIVERSE BY, (A) USING THE LAWS OF PHYSICS WHICH TELL US HOW A PRESENTLY OBSERVABLE GALAXY WILL EVOLVE WHEN NO LONGER OBSERVABLE OR, (B) USING THE COSMOLOGICAL PRINCIPLE.
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