Philosophy of Food and Drink

Edited by Andrea Borghini (Università degli Studi di Milano, Università degli Studi di Milano)
About this topic
Summary The objective of this category is to create a up to date and comprehensive repertoire of the current literature on the philosophy of food and drinking. This is an up and coming area of philosophy. It is distinctly characterized by its appeal to virtually any philosophical sub-discipline, by its cross-disciplinary vocation, and by its relevance for society at large. Alike areas such as philosophy of biology, philosophy of gender, and the philosophy of art, the philosophy of food concerns questions that pertain to several sub-fields, including ethics, political philosophy, philosophy of science, metaphysics, aesthetics, philosophy of mind, and philosophy of language. The ethical and political aspects of the philosophy of food are without doubt its most advanced and well-known aspects. More recently, however, the philosophy of food has taken a more theoretical inflexion. Contemporary philosophers have indeed begun in-depth investigations of questions concerning topics such as: taste, the aesthetics experience of drinking and eating, food identity, food biodiversity, food policy, food law, food and social class, food and gender.

Key works Early contemporary works in the field include, Singer 2009, Korsmeyer 1999, Telfer 1996, and Thompson 1998
Introductions A wide repertoire of topics can be found in Thompson & Kaplan 2012 Area introductions include: Tom & Frey 2011, Barnhill et al 2017,  Monroe & Allhoff 2007Sandler 2014Thompson 2015, and Kaplan 2012. For some area-specific readers: [BROKEN REFERENCE: 0w]#BAITEO-10.  
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  1. Arte culinario y creación poética en Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz.Gallegos Ordorica Sergio & Ortiz Hinojosa Sofia - 2021 - Critica 53 (157):13-44.
    In this paper, we explore the connections between the culinary art and the poetic work by Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz. In particular, following a detailed study of the analogies between, on the one hand, food and culinary preparation, and on the other hand, poetry and composition, we show that culinary art functions as cause and catalyst of Sor Juana’s poetic creation. Also, we show that, for the hieronymite nun, there is an intimate and profound relation between good seasoning, (...)
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  2. Strength or Nausea? Children’s Reasoning About the Health Consequences of Food Consumption.Damien Foinant, Jérémie Lafraire & Jean-Pierre Thibaut - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    Children’s reasoning on food properties and health relationships can contribute to healthier food choices. Food properties can either be positive or negative. One of the main challenges in public health is to foster children’s dietary variety, which contributes to a normal and healthy development. To face this challenge, it is essential to investigate how children generalize these positive and negative properties to other foods, including familiar and unfamiliar ones. In the present experiment, we hypothesized that children might rely on cues (...)
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  3. Strawberries and Cream: The Relationship Between Food Rejection and Thematic Knowledge of Food in Young Children.Abigail Pickard, Jean-Pierre Thibaut & Jérémie Lafraire - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    Establishing healthy dietary habits in childhood is crucial in preventing long-term repercussions, as a lack of dietary variety in childhood leads to enduring impacts on both physical and cognitive health. Poor conceptual knowledge about food has recently been shown to be a driving factor of food rejection. The majority of studies that have investigated the development of food knowledge along with food rejection have mainly focused on one subtype of conceptual knowledge about food, namely taxonomic categories. However, taxonomic categorization is (...)
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  4. Recipes, Traditions, and Representation.Patrik Engisch - forthcoming - In Patrik Engisch & Andrea Borghini (eds.), Philosophy of Recipes. Making, Experiencing, Valuing. London: Bloomsbury.
    Do recipes and their instances, i.e. dishes, have any representational power? This is vexed question in the philosophy of food. In this paper, I take a fresh look on the issue by means of a theory of recipes. I argue that once a certain conception of recipes is in place, complemented by a certain conception of traditions, it becomes plausible that certain recipes, traditional ones, and their instances, traditional dishes, can be said to represent past living conditions. Hence, at some (...)
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  5. Modelling Culinary Value.Patrik Engisch - manuscript
    Culinary products have culinary value. That is, they have value qua culinary products. What, however, is the nature of culinary value and what determines it? This paper addresses this question. It distinguishes between three different possible models of culinary value and defends the third one in the light of some objections.
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  6. Recipes and Culinary Creativity. The Noma Legacy.Patrik Engisch - 2020 - Humana Mente 13 (38).
    In the past years, food has found itself a central focus of creativity in contemporary culture and a pinnacle of this trend has been the kind of culinary creativity displayed at Noma in Copenhagen. But what is culinary creativity? And what is distinctive about the kind of culinary creativity displayed at places like Noma? In this paper, I attempt to answer these two questions. Building up on pioneering work on creativity by Margaret Boden, I argue that creativity is a matter (...)
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  7. The Spirit of Cocktails: On the Conceptual Structure of Cocktail Recipes.Davide Serpico, M. Cristina Amoretti & Marcello Frixione - 2020 - Humana Mente 38 (13):37-59.
    In this paper, we discuss the conceptual structure of cocktail recipes. This topic involves engaging questions for philosophers and food theorists due to some peculiar characteristics of cocktail recipes, such as the fact that they are standardised by international associations but, nonetheless, vagueness in some elements of the recipes introduces a degree of variability between cocktails of the same type. Our proposal is that a classical theory of concepts is unable to account for such peculiar features. Thus, only a hybrid (...)
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  8. The Spirit of Cocktails: On the Conceptual Structure of Cocktail Recipes.Davide Serpico, M. Cristina Amoretti & Marcello Frixione - 2020 - Humana Mente 38 (13):37-59.
    In this paper, we discuss the conceptual structure of cocktail recipes. This topic involves engaging questions for philosophers and food theorists due to some peculiar characteristics of cocktail recipes, such as the fact that they are standardised by international associations but, nonetheless, vagueness in some elements of the recipes introduces a degree of variability between cocktails of the same type. Our proposal is that a classical theory of concepts is unable to account for such peculiar features. Thus, only a hybrid (...)
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  9. A Gradient Framework for Wild Foods.Andrea Borghini, Nicola Piras & Beatrice Serini - 2020 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 84:101293.
    The concept of wild food does not play a significant role in contemporary nutritional science and it is seldom regarded as a salient feature within standard dietary guidelines. The knowledge systems of wild edible taxa are indeed at risk of disappearing. However, recent scholarship in ethnobotany, field biology, and philosophy demonstrated the crucial role of wild foods for food biodiversity and food security. The knowledge of how to use and consume wild foods is not only a means to deliver high-end (...)
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  10. Bittersweet Food.Shen-Yi Liao - 2021 - Critica 53 (157):71–93.
    Nostalgia and food are intertwined universals in human experience. All of us have experienced nostalgia centered on food, and all of us have experienced food infused with nostalgia. To explore the links between nostalgia and food, I start with a rough taxonomy of nostalgic foods, and illustrate it with examples. Despite their diversity, I argue that there is a psychological commonality to experiencing nostalgic foods of all kinds: imagination. On my account, imagination is the key to understanding the cognitive, conative, (...)
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  11. Beeing & Time: Kiss of Chemoreception & the Bug in Dasein's Mouth.Virgil W. Brower - 2014 - In Laurence Talairach-Vielmas & Marie Bouchet (eds.), Insects in Literature & the Arts. Brussels, Belgium: pp. 197-217.
    "Brower explores the way philosophers were inspired by entomological social systems and communication to reflect on human psyche, social behavior, community organization, communication, and inter-individual relationships. His essay rehearses the swarms of insects embedded in contemporary philosophy and literary theory, not only showing how many of the major concepts (or philosophemes) in continental philosophy – sexuality, politics, thinking, time, interdependence, and language – draw lessons from the world of insects, but also illustrating again how the insect world spurred human reflection.".
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  12. From Field to Fork: Food Ethics for Everyone.Paul B. Thompson - 2015 - Oxford University Press USA.
    After centuries of neglect, the ethics of food are back with a vengeance. Justice for food workers and small farmers has joined the rising tide of concern over the impact of industrial agriculture on food animals and the broader environment, all while a global epidemic of obesity-related diseases threatens to overwhelm modern health systems. An emerging worldwide social movement has turned to local and organic foods, and struggles to exploit widespread concern over the next wave of genetic engineering or nanotechnologies (...)
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  13. The Emergence of Vitamins as Bio-Political Objects During World War I.Robyn Smith - 2009 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 40 (3):179-189.
    Biochemists investigating the problem of the vitamins in the early years of the twentieth century were working without an object, as such. Although they had developed a fairly elaborate idea of the character of the ‘vitamine’ and its role in metabolism, vitamins were not yet biochemical objects, but rather ‘functional ascriptions’ and ‘explanatory devices’. I suggest that an early instance of the changing status of the object of the ‘vitamins’ can be found in their stabilization, through the course of World (...)
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Drinks and Drinking
See also: Alcoholism
Coffee and Tea
  1. Totul despre cafea - Cultivare, preparare, reţete, aspecte culturale.Nicolae Sfetcu - 2015 - Drobeta Turnu Severin: MultiMedia Publishing.
    Un ghid complet pentru cultivarea şi prepararea celor mai variate tipuri de cafea, cu accent pe aspectele culturale şi de sănătate, şi modalităţi de includere a cafelei în diverse deserturi şi cocktailuri. Cafeaua este o băutură universal recunoscută ca o necesitate umană. Departe de a fi văzută ca un lux sau privită cu indulgenţă, ea este considerată un corolar pentru energia şi eficienţa umană, producând în acelaşi timp o puternică senzaţie de plăcere. Cafeaua este o băutură democratică. Este în acelaşi (...)
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  2. The Unexamined Cup is Not Worth Drinking.Kristopher G. Phillips - 2011 - In Scott F. Parker & Michael W. Austin (eds.), Coffee - Philosophy for Everyone: Grounds for Debate. Wiley-Blackwell.
    There is something that it is like to be you, and I argue that there is something that it is like to experience the terminology that baristas employ in describing coffee. I argue that there is a world of experiential difference between those in the know and those who are not. Borrowing from David Hume's "Of the Standard of Taste" I argue that while everyone likes what they like, one can still be mistaken in liking something of lower quality.
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Drunkenness
  1. Wine and Philosophy.Tim Crane - 2003 - Harper's Magazine 1 (May).
    What could be more dull than the idea of a symposium? The word conjures up associations with dusty dons, tedious academic papers on deservedly obscure facts and theories. In universities these days, what used to be called ‘symposia’ are often called ‘workshops’ – perhaps in a feeble attempt to make the symposium sound more exciting. If this is your view of the symposium, you may be surprised to learn that the original ancient Greek symposium was a drinking party: the word (...)
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  2. Excess.Tim Crane - unknown
    The history of wine-drinking is a history of excess. From Noah’s disastrous first experiments and the bacchanalia of the ancient Greeks to the spectacular overindulgence described in the diaries of Evelyn Waugh, the consumption of wine to excess has been a recurrent theme among those drink and those who write about it. Sometimes the quantities consumed by the drinkers of the past are staggering. According to Roy Porter’s English Society in the Eighteenth Century, ‘to gain a reputation as a blade (...)
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  3. In Vino Veritas.Barry C. Smith & Tim Crane - 2007 - The Philosophers' Magazine 39 (39):75-78.
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Wine
  1. The Spiritual & Sensuous: Aesthetics of Adorno & Scruton.Virgil W. Brower - 2018 - Wassard Elea Rivista 6 (3):127-139.
  2. Percevoir L’Expression Émotionnelle Dans les Objets Inanimés : L’Exemple du Vin: Dialogue.Cain Todd - 2012 - Dialogue 51 (1):129-139.
    ABSTRACT: Amongst inanimate objects, it is generally accepted that at least some art forms, such as music and painting, are capable of being genuinely expressive of emotion, even though it is difficult to understand exactly how. In contrast, although expressive properties can be attributed to non-artworks, such as natural objects or wine, it has often been claimed that such objects cannot be genuinely expressive. Focussing on wine, I argue that once we understand properly the nature of expressiveness, if we allow (...)
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  3. Questions of Taste: The Philosophy of Wine: Book Reviews. [REVIEW]Carolyn Korsmeyer - 2008 - British Journal of Aesthetics 48 (2):233-235.
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  4. "I Drink Therefore I Am: A Philosopher's Guide to Wine" by Roger Scruton. [REVIEW]Tim Crane - 2011 - Philosophy 86 (1):138-42.
    Of all the things we eat or drink, wine is without question the most complex. So it should not be surprising that philosophers have turned their attention to wine: complex phenomena can lend themselves to philosophical speculation. Wine is complex not just in the variety of tastes it presents – ‘wine tastes of everything apart from grapes’, I once heard an expert say – but in its meaning...
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  5. Wine and Philosophy.Tim Crane - 2003 - Harper's Magazine 1 (May).
    What could be more dull than the idea of a symposium? The word conjures up associations with dusty dons, tedious academic papers on deservedly obscure facts and theories. In universities these days, what used to be called ‘symposia’ are often called ‘workshops’ – perhaps in a feeble attempt to make the symposium sound more exciting. If this is your view of the symposium, you may be surprised to learn that the original ancient Greek symposium was a drinking party: the word (...)
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  6. Excess.Tim Crane - unknown
    The history of wine-drinking is a history of excess. From Noah’s disastrous first experiments and the bacchanalia of the ancient Greeks to the spectacular overindulgence described in the diaries of Evelyn Waugh, the consumption of wine to excess has been a recurrent theme among those drink and those who write about it. Sometimes the quantities consumed by the drinkers of the past are staggering. According to Roy Porter’s English Society in the Eighteenth Century, ‘to gain a reputation as a blade (...)
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  7. The Aesthetics of Wine.Douglas Burnham & Ole Martin Skilleas - 2012 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    This book represents the first full-length study of the aesthetics of the appreciation of wine. It introduces and argues for the validity and significance of several new concepts: competency, project, and aesthetic practices. Using these concepts -- together with analyses borrowed from cognitive science, sensory science, Husserlian phenomenology and hermeneutics -- the case is made that wine can be a proper and indeed significant object of aesthetic attention. The implications of this are pursued in three ways: First, within the culture (...)
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  8. The Philosophy of Wine: A Case of Truth, Beauty and Intoxication.Cain Todd - 2010 - Routledge.
    Does this Bonnes-Mares really have notes of chocolate, truffle, violets, and merde de cheval? Can wines really be feminine, profound, pretentious, or cheeky? Can they express emotion or terroir? Do the judgements of 'experts' have any objective validity? Is a great wine a work of art? Questions like these will have been entertained by anyone who has ever puzzled over the tasting notes of a wine writer, or been baffled by the response of a sommelier to an innocent question. Only (...)
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  9. Categories and Appreciation – A Reply to Sackris.Ole Martin Skilleås & Douglas Burnham - 2014 - Journal of Value Inquiry 48 (3):551-557.
    In his article “Category Independent Aesthetic Experience: The Case of Wine” in this journal, David Sackris presents arguments against Kendall Walton’s view in the famous article “Categories of Art.”David Sackris, “Category Independent Aesthetic Experience: The Case of Wine,” The Journal of Value Inquiry, 47 (2013), pp. 111–120; Kendall Walton, “Categories of Art,” in Steven M. Cahn and Aaron Meskin (Eds) Aesthetics: A Comprehensive Anthology. (Oxford: Blackwell, 2007), pp. 521–537. [First published in The Philosophical Review, 79 (1970), pp. 334–367.] He claims, (...)
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  10. You'll Never Drink Alone: Wine Tasting and Aesthetic Practice.Douglas Burnham & Ole Martin Skilleås - 2008 - In Fritz Allhoff (ed.), Wine and Philosophy. Blackwell.
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  11. Wine as an Aesthetic Object.Tim Crane - 2007 - In Barry C. Smith (ed.), Questions of Taste: The Philosophy of Wine. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 141--156.
    Art is one thing, the aesthetic another. Things can be appreciated aesthetically – for instance, in terms of the traditional category of the beautiful – without being works of art. A landscape can be appreciated as beautiful; so can a man or a woman. Appreciation of such natural objects in terms of their beauty certainly counts as aesthetic appreciation, if anything does. This is not simply because landscapes and people are not artefacts; for there are also artefacts which are assessable (...)
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  12. Wineworld: Tasting, Making, Drinking, Being.Nicola Perullo - 2012 - Rivista di Estetica 51:3-48.
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  13. Wineworld. New Essays on Wine, Taste, Philosophy and Aesthetics.Nicola Perullo - 2012 - Rivista di Estetica 51:3-48.
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  14. Expression and Objectivity in the Case of Wine: Defending the Aesthetic Terroir of Tastes and Smells.Cain Todd - 2012 - Rivista di Estetica 51:95-115.
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  15. Fermented Thoughts.Ophelia Deroy - 2010 - The Philosophers' Magazine 48 (48):104-105.
  16. In Vino Veritas.Barry C. Smith & Tim Crane - 2007 - The Philosophers' Magazine 39 (39):75-78.
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  17. Questions of Taste: The Philosophy of Wine.Barry C. Smith (ed.) - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    Is the taste of a wine in our minds or in the glass? Can knowledge make a difference to the pleasure a wine gives us? Do the elaborate descriptions of wines in terms of fruits or spices, their "suppleness" or "brawniness," really mean anything? Questions of Taste is the first book to examine the philosophical issues surrounding our experience and enjoyment of wine. Featuring lucid essays from philosophers, a linguist, a biochemist, a wine producer and a wine critic, these leading (...)
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  18. I Drink Therefore I Am: A Philosopher's Guide to Wine.Roger Scruton - 2009 - Continuum.
    This good-humoured book offers an antidote to the pretentious clap-trap that is written about wine today and a profound apology for the drink on which..
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Drinks and Drinking, Misc
  1. Wine and Philosophy.Tim Crane - 2003 - Harper's Magazine 1 (May).
    What could be more dull than the idea of a symposium? The word conjures up associations with dusty dons, tedious academic papers on deservedly obscure facts and theories. In universities these days, what used to be called ‘symposia’ are often called ‘workshops’ – perhaps in a feeble attempt to make the symposium sound more exciting. If this is your view of the symposium, you may be surprised to learn that the original ancient Greek symposium was a drinking party: the word (...)
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  2. Disputing Taste.Carolyn Korsmeyer - 2009 - The Philosophers' Magazine 45:70-76.
    The sense of taste falls low on the hierarchy of the senses because it seems a poor conduit for knowledge of the external world; it directs attention inward rather than outward; its pleasures are sensuous and bodily, prone to overindulgence that distracts from higher human endeavours; and its objects are at best merely pleasant, not of the highest aesthetic value. Such is the traditional assessment; now let us analyse its justice.
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  3. Fermented Thoughts.Ophelia Deroy - 2010 - The Philosophers' Magazine 48 (48):104-105.
  4. Food for Thought: Philosophy and Food.Elizabeth Telfer - 1996 - Routledge.
    The importance of food in our individual lives raises moral questions from the debate over eating animals to the prominence of gourmet cookery in the popular media. Through philosophy, Elizabeth Telfer discusses issues including our obligations to those who are starving; the value of the pleasure of food; food as art; our duties to animals; and the moral virtues of hospitableness and temperance. Elizabeth Telfer shows how much traditional philosophy, from Plato to John Stuart Mill, has to say to illuminate (...)
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Food Ethics
See also: Vegetarianism
  1. Why Should We Address the Climate Crisis?Derek R. Brookes - manuscript
    As a species, we have a firmly embedded attachment to seeing ourselves as ‘apart from’ and ‘superior to’ the natural world. This can prevent us from seeing any intrinsic value in other animals, plant life, rivers, the ocean, the soil, entire ecosystems, and so on. It gives us ‘permission’ to see them instead as being of value only insofar as they serve our interests and goals. This perspective cannot help but affect our motivation to address the climate crisis. If we (...)
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  2. The New Three-Legged Stool: Agroecology, Food Sovereignty, and Food Justice.M. Jahi Chappell & Mindi Schneider - 2017 - In Mary C. Rawlinson & Caleb Ward (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Food Ethics. Routledge. pp. 419--429.
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  3. Participative Inequalities and Food Justice.Clement Loo - 2017 - In Mary C. Rawlinson & Caleb Ward (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Food Ethics. Routledge. pp. 430--440.
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  4. Food Security and Ethics.Marko Ahteensuu & Helena Siipi - 2017 - In Mary C. Rawlinson & Caleb Ward (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Food Ethics. Routledge. pp. 409--418.
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  5. Ethics of Food Waste.Miranda Mirosa, David Pearson & Rory Pearson - 2017 - In Mary C. Rawlinson & Caleb Ward (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Food Ethics. Routledge. pp. 400--408.
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  6. Responsibility for Hunger in Liberal Democracies.David Reynolds & Miranda Mirosa - 2017 - In Mary C. Rawlinson & Caleb Ward (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Food Ethics. Routledge. pp. 388--399.
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  7. Case Studies of Food Sovereignty Initiatives Among the Māori of Aotearoa.Karyn Stein, Miranda Mirosa, Lynette Carter & Marion Johnson - 2017 - In Mary C. Rawlinson & Caleb Ward (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Food Ethics. Routledge. pp. 366--376.
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  8. Individual and Community Identity in Food Sovereignty: The Possibilities and Pitfalls of Translating a Rural Social Movement.Ian Werkheiser - 2017 - In Mary C. Rawlinson & Caleb Ward (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Food Ethics. Routledge. pp. 377--387.
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  9. Labor and Local Food: Farmworkers on Smaller Farms.Margaret Gray - 2017 - In Mary C. Rawlinson & Caleb Ward (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Food Ethics. Routledge. pp. 344--353.
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  10. Seafood Ethics: The Normative Trials of Neptune’s Treasure.Craig K. Harris - 2017 - In Mary C. Rawlinson & Caleb Ward (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Food Ethics. Routledge. pp. 315--327.
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1 — 50 / 268