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  1. L. L. D. A. (2008). On a University Education. Australasian Journal of Psychology and Philosophy 8 (4):241-246.
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  2. Sara Ahmed (2006). Doing Diversity Work in Higher Education in Australia. Educational Philosophy and Theory 38 (6):745–768.
    This paper explores how diversity is used as a key term to describe the social and educational mission of universities in Australia. The paper suggests that we need to explore what diversity ‘does’ in specific contexts. Drawing on interviews with diversity and equal opportunities practitioners, the paper suggests that ‘diversity’ is used in the face of what has been called ‘equity fatigue’. Diversity is associated with what is new, and allows practitioners to align themselves and their units with the existing (...)
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  3. Harold Alderman (1973). The Very Idea of a University. Tulane Studies in Philosophy 22:1-13.
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  4. Matthew C. Altman (2004). What's the Use of Philosophy? Democratic Citizenship and the Direction of Higher Education. Educational Theory 54 (2):143-155.
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  5. Francis Anderson (1930). On a University Education. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 8 (4):241 – 246.
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  6. Jorge Luis Nicolas Audy & Marília Morosini (eds.) (2006). Innovation and Entrepreneurialism in the University =. Edipucrs.
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  7. Aharon Aviram (1992). The Nature of University Education Reconsidered (a Response to Ronald Barnett's the Idea of Higher Education). Journal of Philosophy of Education 26 (2):183–200.
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  8. Raymond F. Bacchetti (1967). The University in Transition. Studies in Philosophy and Education 5 (1):36-46.
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  9. Robert L. Badger (ed.) (2007). Ideas That Work In College Teaching. SUNY Press.
    As members of the faculty of the same college, the State University of New York at Potsdam, the fifteen contributors to this book have the unique experience of working from the same pool of students in order to explore how to improve ...
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  10. Ronald Barnett (2014). The Very Idea of Academic Culture: What Academy? What Culture? Human Affairs 24 (1):7-19.
    In what senses can the academy be said to be a site of culture? Does that very idea bear much weight today? Perhaps the negative proposition has more substance, namely that the academy is no longer a place of culture. After all, we live in dark times-of unbridled power, tyranny, domination and manipulation. Some say that we have entered an age of the posthuman or even the inhuman. It just may be, however, that in such a world, the academic community (...)
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  11. Ronald Barnett (2013). Imagining the University. Routledge.
    Whether studying, researching or deciding policy, this book is vital reading to all those involved in the planning and delivery of higher education"--.
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  12. Ronald Barnett (2011). Being a University. Routledge.
    Ronald Barnett pursues this quest through an exploration of pairs of contending concepts that speak to the idea of the university such as space and time; being ...
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  13. Ronald Barnett (2009). The Postmodern University. In John Strain, Ronald Barnett & Peter Jarvis (eds.), Universities, Ethics, and Professions: Debate and Scrutiny. Routledge 43.
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  14. Ronald Barnett (2005). Recapturing the Universal in the University. Educational Philosophy and Theory 37 (6):785–797.
    The idea of ‘the university’ has stood for universal themes—of knowing, of truthfulness, of learning, of human development, and of critical reason. Through its affirming and sustaining of such themes, the university came itself to stand for universality in at least two senses: the university was neither partial nor local in its significance . Now, this universalism has been shot down: on the one hand, universal themes have been impugned as passé in a postmodern age; in the ‘knowledge society’, knowledge (...)
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  15. Ronald Barnett (2003). Academics as Intellectuals. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 6 (4):108-122.
  16. Ronald Barnett (2000). Realizing the University in an Age of Supercomplexity. Society for Research Into Higher Education & Open University Press.
    The university has lost its way. The world needs the university more than ever but for new reasons. If we are to clarify its new role in the world, we need to find a new vocabulary and a new sense of purpose. The university is faced with supercomplexity, in which our very frames of understanding, action and self-identity are all continually challenged. In such a world, the university has explicitly to take on a dual role: firstly, of compounding supercomplexity, so (...)
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  17. Ronald Barnett (2000). Thinking the University, Again. Educational Philosophy and Theory 32 (3):319–326.
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  18. Ronald Barnett (1997). Higher Education: A Critical Business. Open University Press.
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  19. Ronald Barnett (1993). The Idea of Academic Administration. Journal of Philosophy of Education 27 (2):179–192.
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  20. Ronald Barnett (1988). Does Higher Education Have Aims? Journal of Philosophy of Education 22 (2):239–250.
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  21. Ronald Barnett & Paul Standish (2003). Higher Education and the University. In Nigel Blake (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Education. Blackwell Pub. 215--233.
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  22. Heather Battaly (2013). Detecting Epistemic Vice in Higher Education Policy: Epistemic Insensibility in the Seven Solutions and the REF. Journal of Philosophy of Education 47 (2):263-280.
    This article argues that the Seven Solutions in the US, and the Research Excellence Framework in the UK, manifest the vice of epistemic insensibility. Section I provides an overview of Aristotle's analysis of moral vice in people. Section II applies Aristotle's analysis to epistemic vice, developing an account of epistemic insensibility. In so doing, it contributes a new epistemic vice to the field of virtue epistemology. Section III argues that the (US) Seven Breakthrough Solutions and, to a lesser extent, the (...)
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  23. Andrew Belsey (1982). Philosophy and University Education. Metaphilosophy 13 (3-4):318-325.
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  24. Christopher Martin Ben Kotzee (2013). Who Should Go to University? Justice in University Admissions. Journal of Philosophy of Education 47 (4):623-641.
    Current debates regarding justice in university admissions most often approach the question of access to university from a technical, policy‐focussed perspective. Despite the attention that access to university receives in the press and policy literature, ethical discussion tends to focus on technical matters such as who should pay for university or which schemes of selection are allowable, not the question of who should go to university in the first place. We address the question of university admissions—the question of who should (...)
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  25. Søren Bengtsen & Ronald Barnett (2016). Confronting the Dark Side of Higher Education. Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (4).
    In this paper we philosophically explore the notion of darkness within higher education teaching and learning. Within the present-day discourse of how to make visible and to explicate teaching and learning strategies through alignment procedures and evidence-based intellectual leadership, we argue that dark spots and blind angles grow too. As we struggle to make visible and to evaluate, assess, manage and organise higher education, the darkness of the institution actually expands. We use the term ‘dark’ to comprehend challenges, situations, reactions, (...)
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  26. Martin Benjamin (1986). Ethical Problems in Higher Education. Teaching Philosophy 9 (4):373-375.
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  27. Lee Benson (2007). Dewey's Dream: Universities and Democracies in an Age of Education Reform: Civil Society, Public Schools, and Democratic Citizenship. Temple University Press.
    Introduction : Dewey's lifelong crusade for participatory democracy -- Michigan beginnings, 1884-1894 -- Dewey at the University of Chicago, 1894-1904 -- Dewey leaves the University of Chicago for Columbia University -- Elsie Clapp's contributions to community schools -- Penn and the third revolution in American higher education -- The Center for Community Partnerships -- The university civic responsibility idea becomes an international movement -- John Dewey, the Coalition for Community Schools, and developing a participatory democratic American society.
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  28. Barbara A. Biesecker (2006). Eyes of the University: Right to Philosophy 2 (Review). Philosophy and Rhetoric 39 (3):254-256.
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  29. Gert Biesta (2007). Towards the Knowledge Democracy? Knowledge Production and the Civic Role of the University. Studies in Philosophy and Education 26 (5):467-479.
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  30. Böhler Dietrich (1983). New Ethics — Desideratum of Reason and Task of Higher Education. Dialectics and Humanism 10 (4):145-155.
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  31. Paul Bou-habib (2010). Who Should Pay for Higher Education? Journal of Philosophy of Education 44 (4):479-495.
    Policies that shift the costs of higher education from the taxpayer to the university student or graduate are increasingly popular, yet they have not been subjected to a thorough normative analysis. This paper provides a critical survey of the standard arguments that have been used in the public debate on higher education funding. These arguments are found to be wanting. In their place, the paper offers a more systematic approach for dealing with the normative issues raised by the funding of (...)
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  32. Robert Greenleaf Brice (2008). A Reply to John Searle and Other Traditionalists. Multicultural Education 16 (2):37-40.
    One of the more recent pedagogical debates confronting university instructors is whether liberal education should be replaced with multiculturalism. John Searle has labeled these positions as “traditionalists” and “challengers,” respectively. While not finding “much that is objectionable in the [traditionalists’] assumptions,” Searle argues that the challengers’ assumptions are “weak” and “fallacious.” This negative outcome for the challengers however, is due in large part to Searle’s misrepresentation of their position. Searle presents a flawed, straw-man argument; he unfairly and inaccurately presents the (...)
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  33. Laurence Brockliss (2006). The Moment of No Return: The University of Paris and the Death of Aristotelianism. Science and Education 15 (2-4):259-278.
    Aristotelianism remained the dominant influence on the course of natural philosophy taught at the University of Paris until the 1690s, when it was swiftly replaced by Cartesianism. The change was not one wanted by church or state and it can only be understood by developments within the wider University. On the one hand, the opening of a new college, the Collège de Mazarin, provided an environment in which the mechanical philosophy could flourish. On the other, divisions within the French Catholic (...)
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  34. John Seiler Brubacher (1982). On the Philosophy of Higher Education. Jossey-Bass.
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  35. Brian Bruya (2015). The Tacit Rejection of Multiculturalism in American Philosophy Ph.D. Programs: The Case of Chinese Philosophy. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 14 (3):369-389.
    At the confluence of the philosophy of education and social/political philosophy lies the question of how we should educate the next generation of philosophy professors. Part of the question involves how broad such an education should be in order to educate teachers with the ability to, themselves, educate citizens competent to function in a diverse, globalized world. As traditional Western education systems from elementary schools through universities have embraced multicultural sources over the last few decades, philosophy Ph.D. programs have bucked (...)
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  36. Steven Burik (2009). Opening Philosophy to the World: Derrida and Education in Philosophy. Educational Theory 59 (3):297-312.
    In this essay, Steven Burik discusses Jacques Derrida's position with regard to the place of education in philosophy within the university system, and then relates these thoughts to comparative philosophy. Philosophers find themselves constantly having to defend philosophy and the importance of teaching philosophy against pressure from the powers that be. Burik contends that the argument Derrida set forth to “protect” philosophy entails a double bind: Derrida emphasized the value and importance of philosophical thinking while at the same time criticizing (...)
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  37. Patricia A. Carey (2011). Feminism and Pragmatism: Change Toward a More Inclusive Philosophy of Higher Education. Dissertation, Proquest
  38. Patrick Carmichael (2011). Tribes, Territories and Threshold Concepts: Educational Materialisms at Work in Higher Education. Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (s1):31-42.
    The idea of transformative and troublesome ‘threshold concepts’ has been popular and influential in higher education. This article reports how teachers with different disciplinary affiliations responded to the ‘concept of thresholds’ in the course of a cross-disciplinary research project. It describes how the idea was territorialised and enacted through established materialising discourses in different disciplinary settings and enacted through pedagogical practice, technology and assessment. This has implications for professional development and pedagogical practice and endeavours to create ‘self-organising classrooms’ along Deleuzian (...)
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  39. A. Scott Carson (2007). Should a For-Profit Corporation Own and Operate a University? Philosophy of Management 6 (1):17-34.
    For-profit universities are degree-granting institutions that are owned and operated by business corporations. This paper addresses two related public policy questions about for-profit universities. First, should governments and appropriate regulatory bodies permit for-profit universities to grant degrees in their jurisdiction? Second, should higher education policy be developed to create for-profit universities? In this paper, a property rights argument is presented to demonstrate that a corporation should have the right to offer degrees if certain regulatory tests can be met. In limited (...)
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  40. Anthony Pike Cavendish (1971). Philosophy in Higher Education: An Inaugural Lecture Delivered at St. David's College, Lampeter, on Founder's Day, 17 November 1970. Cardiff,University of Wales Press.
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  41. W. Norris Clarke (1956). St. Ignatius' Idea of a Jesuit University. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 31 (2):315-318.
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  42. Matthew Clayton (2012). On Widening Participation in Higher Education Through Positive Discrimination. Journal of Philosophy of Education 46 (3):414-431.
    Notwithstanding an ongoing concern about the low representation of certain groups in higher education, there is reluctance on the part of politicians and policy makers to adopt positive discrimination as an appropriate means of widening participation. This article offers an account of the different objections to positive discrimination and, thereafter, clarifies and criticises the view that universities ought to select those applicants who are expected to be most successful as students. It distinguishes arguments from meritocracy, desert, respect, and productivity and (...)
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  43. Frank Codispoti (2011). The Academic College Course is An Argument. Inquiry 26 (1):47-54.
    A college academic course is an argument constructed by the professor who teaches the course. Richard Paul’s elements of thinking are used to clarify this contention. It is the responsibility of the professor to choose reading materials, construct lectures, and develop other activities and assignments that can best aid her students to understand the argument. Reading texts and listening to lectures effectively to grasp the argument requires critical thinking skills that can be learned by students. Students fail when those responsible (...)
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  44. Ben Colburn & Hugh Lazenby (2016). Hypothetical Insurance and Higher Education. Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (4):587-604.
    What level of government subsidy of higher education is justified, in what form, and for what reasons? We answer these questions by applying the hypothetical insurance approach, originally developed by Ronald Dworkin in his work on distributive justice. On this approach, when asking how to fund and deliver public services in a particular domain, we should seek to model what would be the outcome of a hypothetical insurance market: we stipulate that participants lack knowledge about their specific resources and risks, (...)
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  45. Stefan Collini (2012). What Are Universities For? Penguin.
    Stefan Collini challenges the common claim that universities need to show that they help to make money in order to justify getting more money.
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  46. T. Corcoran (1938). Catholic Higher Education in Europe. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 13 (3):395-408.
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  47. John Cowan (2006). On Becoming an Innovative University Teacher: Reflection in Action. Society for Research Into Higher Education & Open University Press.
    "This is one of the most interesting texts I have read for many years ... It is authoritative and clearly written. It provides a rich set of examples of teaching, and a reflective discourse." Professor George Brown "...succeeds in inspiring the reader by making the process of reflective learning interesting and thought provoking ... has a narrative drive which makes it a book too good to put down." Dr Mary Thorpe "...a delightful and unusual reflective journey...the whole book is driven (...)
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  48. Bryan R. Cross (2014). MacIntyre on the Practice of Philosophy and the University. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 88 (4):751-766.
    Especially since his “Reconceiving the University as an Institution and the Lecture as a Genre,” Alasdair MacIntyre has repeatedly returned to the subject of reconceiving university education, proposing a vision of what a university is and what a university education should be that differs widely from contemporary institutions and practices, and offering strong criticisms of the contemporary research university. He has argued provocatively that in its present form, the contemporary research university is not a university at all because it does (...)
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  49. Joseph Cunningham (2013). Praxis Exiled: Herbert Marcuse and the One Dimensional University. Journal of Philosophy of Education 47 (4):537-547.
    Leading Frankfurt School theorist, Herbert Marcuse, possessed an intricate relationship with higher education. As a professor, Marcuse participated in the 1960s student movements, believing that college students had potential as revolutionary subjects. Additionally, Marcuse advocated for a college education empowered by a form of praxis that extended education outside the university into realms of critical thought and action. However, the more pessimistic facet of his theory, best represented in the canonical One Dimensional Man, now seems to be the dominant ideology (...)
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  50. Alex Demirovic (2010). NEWS-UNIVERSITIES IN CRISIS-Education is Not for $ A£€: Student Protests in Germany. Radical Philosophy 160:58.
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1 — 50 / 293